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  • Brakes: brake line flares

    This may be a stupid question, but here goes. 99% of the Studebaker brake lines are double flared. The exception would be the Bendix disc brakes that use the bubble flairs on the calipers. Is it possible to use the bubble flair in place of the double flair on the other brake lines? This would include using the standard double flair nipples and standard Studebaker hoses and fittings.
    This question came up today while we were trying to get some new double flairs to stop leaking.

    Thanks, Mark

  • #2
    I made some flare gaskets for some stainless lines I couldn't get to stop leaking. kinda like these copper ones.Click image for larger version

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    Bez Auto Alchemy
    573-318-8948
    http://bezautoalchemy.com


    "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

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    • #3
      Any Idea were I can find the copper gaskets, I like the idea. They look tough to make because of the small size .

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Mark Plucenik View Post
        Any Idea were I can find the copper gaskets, I like the idea. They look tough to make because of the small size .
        Single flare a copper 3/16" line and cut off the flare, as a thought.

        Bob

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        • #5
          To reply to the original question: No the bubble flare will not work in place of the double flare in the stock (or any other) inverted flare fittings.
          sigpic

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          • #6
            If your double flares are leaking, there is something wrong with your flaring tool or your procedure. You must chamfer the cut end of the tubing before flaring. The new flexible Cunifer tubing is much easier to flare, and bend, and is corrosion-resistant.
            Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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            • #7
              Mark -

              As bensherb states...

              NO...if you look at the two flares, one is more of a ball (convex), while the other is inset (concave).
              Completely different shape and not even remotely to be confused with each other.

              Mike

              P.s. - Safety wise, to me...copper or aluminum flare savers (NOT gaskets !) are a stop-gap, emergency, temporary fix ONLY...at best.
              Best bet, replace the line.

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              • #8
                I know the flares are completely different but I'm just grabbing at straws. The funny part about this is I have done at least 12 , maybe 15 complete brake line replacement jobs for friends and family over the last 5 years- mostly GM cars with there rotten brake lines - with not 1 leak! I do my own car and 3 fittings are giving me trouble.

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                • #9
                  Mike the key to a leak free double flare is to chamfer the end of the line real good before flaring. some times even that wont work,so just make up a new line or snip the flare off and try again.i just completed a re-plumb on a 60 lark, only leaker was the left front,the short one from junction block to brake hose. took 3 tries. still have line left.i really am out of practice!!! Luck Doofus PS used Ni Cop line, much easier to work with.

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                  • #10
                    I have had leaking problems with double flares but it was always with SS tubing. The double flare was stronger than the brass female fitting. The fitting crushed instead of the flared end of the tube. I no longer make lines from SS. There is no real reason to because the cars are not going to be exposed to salt brine laced winter roads. Maybe for Bonneville but we will deal with that if it comes up.
                    james r pepper

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                    • #11
                      I have fabricated many double flare stainless brake lines to prevent internal rust in the lines..some leaked, some didn't. I started installing nitrile "O" rings, small enough to fit into where the lip of the double flair seated in the fitting, and tightened normally. I never had another leak ever again, using DOT 5.
                      Last edited by 345 DeSoto; 03-31-2019, 01:20 PM.

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                      • #12
                        What works for me is making sure I use a new double-flare anvil with my flaring tool when I start. I doesn't seem to take much wear on that little 3/16" anvil to ensure an off-center flare. I've thought about investing in a tool to lap the finished flare (see link), but it won't help if the flare is cockeyed. I sure like the nickel-copper brake line. http://koultools.com/product/flare-lapping-tool/

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                        • #13
                          With all these testimonials, its a wonder most don't simply use factory flared lines........I guess if its a concour's car...... but most of our cars are not so. Also, just talking the other day, if you're unlucky not to find a NOS, non rusted brake cylinder(s)..... roll the dice with Dot 5 fluid.....it finds a way to leak in places Dot 3 won't.....

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                          • #14
                            Jim, I believe the Cunifer line is as corrosion-resistant as stainless steel. Just not as pretty, but sure easy to work with. I won't use anything else, now, if I am doing an entire brake system. Might use the old plain steel line if simply replacing a single piece on a driver car.
                            Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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                            • #15
                              I do like and I am using Dot 5 fluid and I agree it is much more prone to leak. I have eliminated , I hope all the leaks. Backing off and retightening the fittings. I also always coat all the fittings and lines with brake fluid before I start to assemble. I guess I'm just crying now, figure at least 10 flares per car I've done lately at least 10 cars for free, friends and family, 100 flares, and not one leak! I do my own and have problems. Not fair.
                              I did try to locate those Flare savers/gaskets. No luck, One hydraulic shop said they could order the 3/16 ", package of 100, for about $70. They never heard of them until I gave them the Parker part number.

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