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Anyone ever removed a hood on their own?

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  • Frank DuVal
    replied
    Drill a 18" locating hole through the hinge flat
    I do hope that is a misprint of 1/8"

    Leave a comment:


  • cultural infidel
    replied
    Thanks, y'all!
    Attached Files

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  • sweetolbob
    replied
    Originally posted by mbstude View Post
    A Lark hood can’t weigh more than 30 pounds. Prop it up wth the rod as you normally would, remove the springs and the 4 hinge nuts, and pull the hinges off the hood one side at a time and let the hood corner rest on the cowl. Put a rolled up towel under the corner if you don’t want to chip the paint. With the hinges free, lift the front of the hood off the prop rod, lower it down until you can grab both sides, and pick it up off the car.

    I’ve done it by myself with Larks, mid 50s sedans, and even a couple of Hawks. Nothing to it.

    Clark, marking the hinge location wouldn’t be necessary on an early Lark. The hinge is adjusted at the cowl on those cars, not the hood like your ‘63. Makes it even easier on the earlier cars.
    Under 30 pounds and under 30 years of age is a good combination for hood removal but as the average age is well over 30 years here as well as the muscles and body support structure that are also aged.

    I've done many the way you suggested and you know I'm big enough to handle one but in my dotage I'm now resorting to guile and force multiplication accessories, however.

    Good though on the adjustment.

    Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • mbstude
    replied
    A Lark hood can’t weigh more than 30 pounds. Prop it up wth the rod as you normally would, remove the springs and the 4 hinge nuts, and pull the hinges off the hood one side at a time and let the hood corner rest on the cowl. Put a rolled up towel under the corner if you don’t want to chip the paint. With the hinges free, lift the front of the hood off the prop rod, lower it down until you can grab both sides, and pick it up off the car.

    I’ve done it by myself with Larks, mid 50s sedans, and even a couple of Hawks. Nothing to it.

    Clark, marking the hinge location wouldn’t be necessary on an early Lark. The hinge is adjusted at the cowl on those cars, not the hood like your ‘63. Makes it even easier on the earlier cars.

    Leave a comment:


  • showbizkid
    replied
    One tip I learned too late: Drill a 18" locating hole through the hinge flat and hood flange on each side before dismounting. This will help locate the hood in its proper location back-to-front when you reinstall it without having to resort to trial and error - you just slip a drill bit through the holes on each side and tighten up the bolts

    Leave a comment:


  • cultural infidel
    replied
    Originally posted by jclary View Post
    Well...once you remove the hinge piece it is attached to...if you are not quick enough to get out of the way...your smashed fingernail will answer the question.
    haha note taken. First time removing a hood, so I didn't even think of that!

    Leave a comment:


  • jnormanh
    replied
    Originally posted by Treblig View Post
    I used eye bolts screwed into in the rafters of my carport. It worked great and is pretty safe. But it was a heavy '46 Chevy hood (weigh a ton). I installed the hood the same way but in reverse. It made it really easy by myself. treblig
    I don't know about rafters, but my garage has ceiling joists. I spanned three of them, with a 2"x8" and lag screws, screwed a big hook eye in, hung a half ton hoist and pulled an engine. No sweat.

    Leave a comment:


  • jclary
    replied
    Originally posted by cultural infidel View Post
    ...This may be a dumb question, but what is the purpose of removing the springs from the hinges?
    Well...once you remove the hinge piece it is attached to...if you are not quick enough to get out of the way...your smashed fingernail will answer the question.

    Leave a comment:


  • cultural infidel
    replied
    Thank you all for the suggestions and tips! I hadnt thought of a pulley or eye bolt set up before, that would definitely ease up on the ol' back!

    This may be a dumb question, but what is the purpose of removing the springs from the hinges?

    Leave a comment:


  • sweetolbob
    replied
    I have both a chain fall and electric hoist I use but if you have something to attach to above your working area, the above suggestions about pulleys are excellent.

    $15 will get you one of these from HF or most hardware or sporting goods stores. https://www.harborfreight.com/gambre...ist-99758.html

    I kept one in my quad for lifting deer onto it. It should work well for your hood application.

    Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • thunderations
    replied
    This can be done with an engine hoist also.
    Originally posted by 64V-K7 View Post
    Hawk Hood: used pulleys on ceiling, one for each side and one for the grill opening, all with a line to an attachment on the corners of the hood. Open the hood, make taut the lines to the pulleys, unbolt the hood and roll the car away.

    A Lark should be easy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Treblig
    replied
    I used eye bolts screwed into in the rafters of my carport. It worked great and is pretty safe. But it was a heavy '46 Chevy hood (weigh a ton). I installed the hood the same way but in reverse. It made it really easy by myself. treblig

    Leave a comment:


  • Jeffry Cassel
    replied
    Lark easier than Hawk, for sure. But it is still a good idea to invite someone over for a beer and hood removal. It is a good way to slip a disc or give yourself a hernia (not to mention scratching up the car!), Doctor C ps: I like the 64V-K7 idea - clever.

    Leave a comment:


  • 64V-K7
    replied
    Hawk Hood: used pulleys on ceiling, one for each side and one for the grill opening, all with a line to an attachment on the corners of the hood. Open the hood, make taut the lines to the pulleys, unbolt the hood and roll the car away.

    A Lark should be easy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Blue 15G
    replied
    I enjoyed your post John and, while I have not built or fixed anything to the extent that you did, I do agree that when you're working alone it's surprising sometimes how you can come up with a workable solution to accomplish something when you have to.

    Leave a comment:

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