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Anyone ever removed a hood on their own?

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  • Body / Glass: Anyone ever removed a hood on their own?

    Title says it all. How feasible would it be to get the hood off of my Lark by myself? Tips? Tricks? Suggestions?
    1960 Lark VIII Regal Wagon


  • #2
    The Lark hood should be easy, it's relitively light and small. I just unbolt the hinges from the hood, lean over it from the front, grab the left and right edges, lever it against my stomach and stand up straight. Carry it to somewhere it can lean, let it slide in one hand till that hand is at the back edge and stand it on the now free side. The Hawk hood is another story; it's too long to lift that way; at least for me. It's a two man deal.

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    • #3
      roll up some towels for the back edges to slip on to...

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      • #4
        Originally posted by cultural infidel View Post
        Title says it all. How feasible would it be to get the hood off of my Lark by myself? Tips? Tricks? Suggestions?
        Sure!... Just be careful, get yourself a chair, sit for a while and study it. Raise the hood and place it on its prop-rod as normal. Get a few old blankets, or buy some cheap mover's blankets, place one under the hood in the cowl area, and drape the fenders. Remove the springs from each side of the hinges that are attached underneath the fenders. When you remove those springs, the hood might shift a bit, but if it sits down on the metal the blankets will protect the paint. Then remove the hinge nuts from their attachment bolts. Do not remove the hinge straps from the hood until you have all the nuts off. Once you have all the nuts off, place a board about midway across the front fenders. Lower the hood onto the board and then remove the hinge straps from their bolts one corner at a time. Depending on your reach and strength, you can either lift the hood off or drag it to a safe place. I am not a very big guy (184lbs), and I have built (cobbled) a 40' X 64' building all by myself. Built a couple of barns and done several body-off frame projects. Never had any help. So, with a little thought, I'm confident you can handle this little task.

        Currently, I am repairing several outbuildings. Yesterday I found myself in a very awkward position while trying to place paneling on a barn side and square it up with no help. After a few minutes in my trusty chair, I figured it out. Using a Studebaker bumper jack and an old T-model jack, I was able to keep the panels in place, adjust & square them up, and hold them in place long enough to get a couple of nails in. I will confess, at 74 years old...some of this takes a lot longer than it did at 44. This project is a small utility Dutch roof style building and the side panels are less than four feet high. I'm doing this one first before taking on another with full 8' side panels. I don't know if I can handle that one by myself. I might have to resort to desperation...like dragging my 18-year-old grandson away from his computer games and see if he can perform any tasks in the "real world?"
        John Clary
        Greer, SC

        SDC member since 1975

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        • #5
          I enjoyed your post John and, while I have not built or fixed anything to the extent that you did, I do agree that when you're working alone it's surprising sometimes how you can come up with a workable solution to accomplish something when you have to.

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          • #6
            Hawk Hood: used pulleys on ceiling, one for each side and one for the grill opening, all with a line to an attachment on the corners of the hood. Open the hood, make taut the lines to the pulleys, unbolt the hood and roll the car away.

            A Lark should be easy.
            64 GT Hawk (K7)
            1970 Avanti (R3)

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            • #7
              Lark easier than Hawk, for sure. But it is still a good idea to invite someone over for a beer and hood removal. It is a good way to slip a disc or give yourself a hernia (not to mention scratching up the car!), Doctor C ps: I like the 64V-K7 idea - clever.

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              • #8
                I used eye bolts screwed into in the rafters of my carport. It worked great and is pretty safe. But it was a heavy '46 Chevy hood (weigh a ton). I installed the hood the same way but in reverse. It made it really easy by myself. treblig

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                • #9
                  This can be done with an engine hoist also.
                  Originally posted by 64V-K7 View Post
                  Hawk Hood: used pulleys on ceiling, one for each side and one for the grill opening, all with a line to an attachment on the corners of the hood. Open the hood, make taut the lines to the pulleys, unbolt the hood and roll the car away.

                  A Lark should be easy.
                  sigpic1966 Daytona (The First One)
                  1950 Champion Convertible
                  1950 Champion 4Dr
                  1955 President 2 Dr Hardtop
                  1957 Thunderbird

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                  • #10
                    I have both a chain fall and electric hoist I use but if you have something to attach to above your working area, the above suggestions about pulleys are excellent.

                    $15 will get you one of these from HF or most hardware or sporting goods stores. https://www.harborfreight.com/gambre...ist-99758.html

                    I kept one in my quad for lifting deer onto it. It should work well for your hood application.

                    Bob

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                    • #11
                      Thank you all for the suggestions and tips! I hadnt thought of a pulley or eye bolt set up before, that would definitely ease up on the ol' back!

                      This may be a dumb question, but what is the purpose of removing the springs from the hinges?
                      1960 Lark VIII Regal Wagon

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by cultural infidel View Post
                        ...This may be a dumb question, but what is the purpose of removing the springs from the hinges?
                        Well...once you remove the hinge piece it is attached to...if you are not quick enough to get out of the way...your smashed fingernail will answer the question.
                        John Clary
                        Greer, SC

                        SDC member since 1975

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Treblig View Post
                          I used eye bolts screwed into in the rafters of my carport. It worked great and is pretty safe. But it was a heavy '46 Chevy hood (weigh a ton). I installed the hood the same way but in reverse. It made it really easy by myself. treblig
                          I don't know about rafters, but my garage has ceiling joists. I spanned three of them, with a 2"x8" and lag screws, screwed a big hook eye in, hung a half ton hoist and pulled an engine. No sweat.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jclary View Post
                            Well...once you remove the hinge piece it is attached to...if you are not quick enough to get out of the way...your smashed fingernail will answer the question.
                            haha note taken. First time removing a hood, so I didn't even think of that!
                            1960 Lark VIII Regal Wagon

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                            • #15
                              One tip I learned too late: Drill a 18" locating hole through the hinge flat and hood flange on each side before dismounting. This will help locate the hood in its proper location back-to-front when you reinstall it without having to resort to trial and error - you just slip a drill bit through the holes on each side and tighten up the bolts

                              Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

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