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Adhesive application and arch gaskets in oil pan gasket replacement

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  • Engine: Adhesive application and arch gaskets in oil pan gasket replacement

    A little discouraged after difficulty with the rear main oil pan gasket on my 1955 259 v8. Took me all day to find an adhesive that would work. Someone advised Permatex #3. Too slippery. Probably might work after letting coated gasket and channel:sit about 45 min or so. 3 M gasket adhesive worked first try. Took me so long that I had to let the assembled gasket, the assembled ”loose” timing cover coated with #2 permetx installed gaskets sit overnight. I am about ready to order a new set of gaskets and redo because seems like letting something that’s only partially assembled sit another day is probably a great ecxcuse for something to develop a leak. Anybody else ever have this issue?

  • #2
    I don't use an adhesive. Black 3M rtv gasket maker has always worked well. If ,for some reason you want to glue it in place, try 3M weather strip adhesive and gasket sealant. Permatex 'High Tack" would be another option

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Jeffry Cassel View Post
      I don't use an adhesive. Black 3M rtv gasket maker has always worked well. If ,for some reason you want to glue it in place, try 3M weather strip adhesive and gasket sealant. Permatex 'High Tack" would be another option
      Thx
      the sealant I ended up using was the 3M weatherstrip and gasket sealant. My bad communicating. Just wondering if there is a good way to speed up the assembly process- now that I found something that works. (Realizing, of course, that we all have different skill levels.)

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      • #4
        I use a long bolt or a threaded rod in the oil pan corners, and put a oil proof sealant (a Permatex product called "the right Stuff") never plain RTV silicone. Put the rear cork partially in it's groove in the rear main cap after laying a small bead of "the right stuff". Put the pan rail gaskets over the threaded rods and yes, I do trim the ends flush with the cork. Fill where it buts up against the cork with a bead of sealant. I usually run a very very thin smeared out bead (film really) on both sides of the oil pan rail gaskets. With the rear cork in place, and the front cork sealed to the oil pan, it's ends hanging evenly out, lower the pan over the threaded rods, and tighten the nuts evenly and the corks usually will squish evenly and nicely. Once it is drawn up enough to get other bolts in I do that, then remove the threaded rods, and replace with the correct bolts. It's not rocket surgery or brain science.
        Bez Auto Alchemy
        573-318-8948
        http://bezautoalchemy.com


        "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

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        • #5
          I'll second using "The Right Stuff" or another that I really like is the similar product by GM. I don't have the # of it but I get it from my local Chevy dealer. It comes in a tube like the 3M weatherstrip adhesive. Bill

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          • #6
            We have always soaked our front and rear seals in water for a few hours. Take some PVC pipe similar in shape to the contour of the oil pan. Put the gaskets inside and submerge. Let them soak for a few hours. Remove from the water and let them dry. After that they will be much easier to work with.

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            • #7
              This worked for me....
              Clean the crevice with alcohol, use contact cement (3M #90) on both crevice and cork. Install while wet. Allows manipulating with the eraser end of a pencil. Dries slowly (a few minutes) as you maneuver it. Works like a charm
              64 GT Hawk (K7)
              1970 Avanti (R3)

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              • #8
                Originally posted by bezhawk View Post
                I use a long bolt or a threaded rod in the oil pan corners, and put a oil proof sealant (a Permatex product called "the right Stuff") never plain RTV silicone. Put the rear cork partially in it's groove in the rear main cap after laying a small bead of "the right stuff". Put the pan rail gaskets over the threaded rods and yes, I do trim the ends flush with the cork. Fill where it buts up against the cork with a bead of sealant. I usually run a very very thin smeared out bead (film really) on both sides of the oil pan rail gaskets. With the rear cork in place, and the front cork sealed to the oil pan, it's ends hanging evenly out, lower the pan over the threaded rods, and tighten the nuts evenly and the corks usually will squish evenly and nicely. Once it is drawn up enough to get other bolts in I do that, then remove the threaded rods, and replace with the correct bolts. It's not rocket surgery or brain science.
                Bez-
                thx for the involved procedure. I understand about the rods- makes everything a lot less clumsy and helps tighten equally. Thanks to others, too, for the input. Will put the ideas to use. Hope springtime comes soon.
                cw

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                • #9
                  The procedure varies slightly in the car and upside down on a bench I agree with Bez for the most part, I do use the long bolts in the corners however I do not trim the cork end seals, they will compress all the way. Most use a sealer compound, your choice, I do not, a perfect gasket and clean surfaces will seal perfectly. I just tore an engine down that was smeared with RTV and it leaked around the front seal and timing chain cover. The RTV was applied excessively and uneven, more isn't always better. I have assembled several engines with no sealer, just gaskets with clean surfaces. A trick for oil pans is to lay a thread along the surface to form a stop/dam to prevent any oil migration, this method is used on aircraft engines.

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                  • #10
                    I trim the fiber PAN gaskets, NOT the cork. Don't trim the cork it will compress. Use of a weatherstrip adhesive isn't very good practice as in direct contact with oil it will dissolve. As will most RTV silicones. It turns to jelly, and will fall in the oil system. Only use something that is impervious to solvents and oils.
                    Bez Auto Alchemy
                    573-318-8948
                    http://bezautoalchemy.com


                    "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

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                    • #11
                      I thought that MIGHT be what you meant Bez, but not everyone would get it, thank for clarifying that.

                      Interesting, so your thought is that the combination of the small side corks in the block recess on the sides of the Main Cap, the Tab on the Pan Side Gaskets and the Cork Arch Gasket leaves too many gaps that could leak, so you cut the Tab off and eliminate it.

                      It seems EVERYONE has their own "Pet" trick, all trying to improve a imperfect design, but most do help.
                      StudeRich
                      Second Generation Stude Driver,
                      Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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                      • #12
                        Bez, I’m curious as to why you put some of that Right Stuff sealant under the rear cork gasket. Can oil get under and out of that rear cork seal?

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                        • #13
                          Yes, cork shrinks over time, and oil will leak past the smallest gap. The sealant does not allow gaps to form. yellow gasket glue will.
                          Think about it, when you put the new cork end arch gaskets in place they stick out each end maybe 1/2".
                          When you take a pan off they don't spring back, they are "set". New cars use a non shrink formed rubber gasket over a steel core. Or they may not even use ANY gasket, just a sealant. Some use a machined groove with a rubber rope gasket. By rubber, I mean a modern formulation, probably some sort of silicone or urethane.
                          Last edited by bezhawk; 03-20-2019, 06:40 AM.
                          Bez Auto Alchemy
                          573-318-8948
                          http://bezautoalchemy.com


                          "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The process is easy when upside downClick image for larger version

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