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Tail Light Print

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  • Body: Tail Light Print

    Printing a tail light. This is version 1 after a prototype print that had some flaws. Now at 68 print hours and getting close if nothing goes wrong. Some rather complex geometry design in what appears as a rather simple taillight.

    Have to admire the designers of old who did the blueprinting with pen, paper, and brain power alone. The mold casting must have been awesome to put together too.
    Attached Files
    Start and Stage Your Studebakers

  • #2
    I appreciate the effort But may I ask Why ? Ed

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    • #3
      Looks like a fun project, but I too wonder why. Those tail light housings are pretty plentiful fairly cheap used and probably some NOS ones are available. I have a nice used set from a 64 Daytona I'm parting out.
      Great job and they look amazing.
      sigpic1966 Daytona (The First One)
      1950 Champion Convertible
      1950 Champion 4Dr
      1955 President 2 Dr Hardtop
      1957 Thunderbird

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      • #4
        Lighter is faster.

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        • #5
          That was a Great Test of your excellent skills, now make something that Dozens will buy to cover your expenses and time.

          1953 C & K Side Grille center BARS

          1954 C & K Side Grille center BARS

          1962-1964 GT Hawk Rear Quarter Top, Transition Mouldings (Chromed Castings) that actually FIT!

          Click image for larger version

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          StudeRich
          Second Generation Stude Driver,
          Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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          • #6
            I've always had the sneaking suspicion that the artistic guys formed something up that looked good on the clay models in the design studio, then the draftsmen made the drawings after the tooling had been made. It didn't mean that the drawing actually matched the tooling or production parts. I've seen this on a number of trim parts for which I ordered the official drawings from the Studebaker National Museum. So, if your drawing matches real parts, that's good! You can use 3D printed PLA parts for investment casting by the "lost PLA" method without going through silicone rubber female molds and wax submasters, especially if you use clear PLA. It works for one or two copies, but silicone rubber molds and wax copies are cheaper for short production runs.

            Click image for larger version

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            Gary Ash
            Dartmouth, Mass.

            '32 Indy car replica (in progress)
            ’41 Commander Land Cruiser
            '48 M5
            '65 Wagonaire Commander
            '63 Wagonaire Standard
            web site at http://www.studegarage.com

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            • #7
              Really cool stuff. I am wondering what 3d printer you use? Also what is the cotton around the bed doing. Also looks like you are printing without a raft. Is it a solid part or fill?
              I don't recognize the software you are using to draw with.

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              • #8
                Printer is Creality CR-10 -400. Large print bed and Z but a bigger 500 mm is now available. Bed is heated to 50 C and cotten helps hold the heat from radiation. Printer was in the garage and temperatures stayed in the 38-48 F range. Used a brim with side tape support to enforce adhesion to the bed. Not a solid. The back side is a copy of the back side just like the front side.
                Slight error in the geometry dimensions which I hope to correct in version 2. Not perfect but getting close. Very long learning curve and requires post print detailing (tom c)
                Attached Files
                Start and Stage Your Studebakers

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                • #9
                  Lots of interesting things going on with 3D printing. I wonder if we will ever have replicators like on Star Trek.
                  "In the heart of Arkansas."
                  Searcy, Arkansas
                  1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
                  1952 2R pickup

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                  • #10
                    Do you think you could use this to make a 289 Roller Cam?...

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                    • #11
                      I've always had the sneaking suspicion that the artistic guys formed something up that looked good on the clay models in the design studio, then the draftsmen made the drawings after the tooling had been made.
                      You are correct, Gary..... I was a tool and die maker for Beechcraft for many years, and it was not unusual for engineers to come down to the shop knowing what they wanted, but not how to draw it (on CATIA, no less). So one of us would make a full scale part in plaster for them, and THEN they would go draw it after getting some points off the nearest CMM. These guys could NOT think in 3-D, and yet they worked in virtual reality.
                      The only difference between death and taxes is that death does not grow worse every time Congress convenes. - Will Rogers

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                      • #12
                        Add me to the list of those who ask, "Why attempt to 3D print a part that is cheap and plentiful?" I must have at least six pairs of these in my stash, and nobody has ever asked for one.
                        Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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                        • #13
                          Is there a strong material that could carry a 'load'? Like ABS? I want a plastic water manifold housing.

                          Lighter is faster.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by 52-fan View Post
                            Lots of interesting things going on with 3D printing. I wonder if we will ever have replicators like on Star Trek.

                            We're getting there.

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                            • #15
                              Made some measurement changes and mirror printed the opposite side. The lens and chrome insert dropped perfectly into the pattern. No adjustment trim was needed and the screw holes are dead on. Some post cleanup and surface smoothing and it will be ready for install. The file will be reworked some more and reprint both sides in ABS or PC filament for longevity. Weight came in at 275 grams. No more 9 lb factory tail lights.
                              Attached Files
                              Start and Stage Your Studebakers

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