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Converting to a Dual Master Cylinder

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  • Robert Crandall
    replied
    I am now finishing my conversion of an off topic truck to dual master cylinder. This is my third conversion. Before I did the first one I found a 1968 Impala in a scrap yard. The master cylinder on it looked like it would be something I could use, and I knew it would be available for a four wheel drum brake application. The bore diameter is one inch, which matched that of the first car I made the change for. The next two also had original one inch bore diameters, so I used the application for a 1968 Impala for them also. In all three cases I made what I thought would work out of wood, test fit it, then had it duplicated in steel. A bonus for when I did my 1949 2R5 was that a man on this forum sold me a hill holder (with the rod!) that I was able to include in my installation scheme. I tied it into the rear brakes. A bonus for the 1950 GMC that I am finishing up now is that the original master cylinder bolted to a bracket that was bolted to the frame. That allowed me to buy a bracket then modify that which let me keep my truck driveable until I took it off the road just to make the bolt in installation. I don't know anything about the two vehicles you ask about, but if there happens to be a separate bracket on them, then modifying a spare bracket will let you keep your cars driveable until you are ready to install. I did lots of measuring, wood cutting, and fitting before I had the steel fabricated, but it did work to make the metal fit as planned. Good luck with yours.

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  • thunderations
    replied
    My mistake, you are correct. Turners MC kit for under floor MC are for 1947-up. I thought that kit was for earlier cars too.
    I have used Turner kits before with no problems. I have heard that others with problems had gotten it taken care of with a phone call to Jim.

    Originally posted by mbstude View Post
    My last experience with the Turner products was less than desirable. Which is why my $600 front disc kit ended up on the scrap pile last week. Anyone who wants more details, message me directly.

    That said, I’m not aware of anyone (Turner included) that makes a dual MC bracket for any prewar model Studebaker.

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  • mbstude
    replied
    My last experience with the Turner products was less than desirable. Which is why my $600 front disc kit ended up on the scrap pile last week. Anyone who wants more details, message me directly.

    That said, I’m not aware of anyone (Turner included) that makes a dual MC bracket for any prewar model Studebaker.

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  • thunderations
    replied
    If you are using Jim Turners bracket and instructions, you should find it is pretty simple and straight forward. Should you run into a problem, Jim is usually just a phone call or e-mail away and will walk you through the problem. There are probably other systems out there, but all should be similar. Once the new MC is installed it just needs to have the lines split into fronts and backs. A hill holder may require additional plumbing, but maybe not. You may not notice a lot of difference in braking, but you will gain a lot of peace of mind knowing you have a back-up system.
    My other recommendation, if you haven't already done it, is to replace all of the flex and steel lines with new ones. Those almost 80 year old steel lines are probably pretty well sealed off and ready to burst with the addition of the new pressure from a new MC.
    Good luck and happy stopping

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  • mangioss
    started a topic Brakes: Converting to a Dual Master Cylinder

    Converting to a Dual Master Cylinder

    I am considering converting my 1942 Commander to a Dual Master Cylinder. A friend with a 41 Champion is considering the same thing. Is there anything that can cause problems with this conversion or is is straight forward?
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