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  • Engine: Lark of the diesel

    I read about a diesel Lark. I frayn, when was this made, what are the engine specifications, who made the engine, and why was this made
    thank you

  • #2
    Here is a posting of said car:
    http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...ht=diesel+lark
    sigpic
    In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Milaca View Post
      so, it has a Perkins diesel engine

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      • #4
        I saw one several years ago at a zone meet in P.A.. It was a nice tidy package. If I remember correctly the some of parking and taillights were a different color than normal 1963 Larks, Ed

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        • #5
          Originally posted by adamkoehler View Post
          so, it has a Perkins diesel engine
          Without researching further, I would immediately speculate the diesel engine was "Perkins." I believe that brand of diesel engine is the universal diesel... like the GM small block chevy for gasoline engines used in custom and "outsourced" applications. Perkins has marketed their engines for tractors, generators, Ford Ranger trucks, and all sorts of other equipment. It would be a fun exercise to see a list of all the various corporations, and equipment using a Perkins diesel engine.
          John Clary
          Greer, SC

          SDC member since 1975

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          • #6
            Yes, Studebaker put Perkins diesels in these.
            There was even a production of the Y1 body taxis that they equipped with Perkins engines.
            There was an extensive article about them in Turning Wheels a couple decades ago.
            Brad Johnson,
            SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
            Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
            '33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight. '53 Commander Starlight
            '56 Sky Hawk in process

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            • #7
              1962 Champ

              51 Commander 4 door

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              • #8
                Here is "the rest of the Story".





                Complete with Export Amber Back Up Lenses probably used as Turn Signals, and Transtar Truck Nameplate.
                There is something you don't see on a Studebaker... a LEFT Hand, Tailpipe!

                Last edited by StudeRich; 02-01-2019, 07:55 PM.
                StudeRich
                Second Generation Stude Driver,
                Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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                • #9
                  On our farm we had tractors (Massey 65) that had that engine. Very easy on fuel and lots of power for the size. That one appears to be a direct injection (injectors go in the top of the head). They give better economy than indirect injection and start better when it’s cold. I would like to own that car or build a clone. I have told this story before, but my Grandfather Drove Studebaker cars and trucks till the end. He also farmed with Massey Ferguson farm equipment. The Marriage of Massey and Stude would have suited Grandpa. He prbobly would have bought one......
                  1962 Champ

                  51 Commander 4 door

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                  • #10
                    That car would have good performance. I imagine that engine is quite heavy. I would not be surprised if more than the venerable Stude v8!
                    Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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                    • #11
                      In the mid-50s, Studebaker was selling V8, 4WD, RHD trucks to India, and proposed a number of other RHD vehicles for customers there. One of them was a forward-control bus that was equipped with a Perkins diesel. The engine was a Perkins model P6, 83hp from 289 (yes, 289!) cubic inches. I believe they built one on a 195" wheelbase 2E truck/bus chassis (without body) for promo photographs. None were sold.
                      Skip Lackie

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                      • #12
                        For true; the Perkins was the generic small diesel of the 1950s-'60s; used worldwide in cars, trucks (Jeep and Dodge here in the US), tractors, fork lifts, boats et al.

                        Also true, it is a relic from the 1930s when the Brits invented the high speed diesel. The result is the noisiest, vibratingest, leakingest little anvil ever. I never knew anyone who had a Perkins who ever wanted another.

                        Building on what Perkins had pioneered, the Japanese small diesels from Kubota, Yanmar, Isuzu, Mitsubishi and Komatsu which came along about the time the Perkins wore out were so much better in every respect and most were designed so they could be retrofitted where the Perkins originally came.

                        jack vines
                        Last edited by PackardV8; 02-02-2019, 10:05 AM.
                        PackardV8

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