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55 V-8 pickup 3/4 ton

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  • Rear Axle: 55 V-8 pickup 3/4 ton

    Original V-8 truck, now with a 56 President 289, I think. Seller says this truck will only go 35-40 mph. That I believe from reading posts on here. Also says overdrive is broken. The truck is a 3/4 ton. Will the axle on a 3/4 ton still be a Dana 44? That would allow for better speeds with a ring and pinion swap, right?
    KURTRUK
    (read it backwards)




    Nothing is politically right which is morally wrong. -A. Lincoln

  • #2
    Not yet enough information. What rpm at 40 mph? The engine itself may be part of the problem.
    But check the tag on the diff to see the ratio.
    sals54

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    • #3
      If it's priced low enough, just grab it and change the diff.....

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      • #4
        The '55 E12 with overdrive would usually have come with a 4.56 or 4.88 Timken rear axle. I drove my 4-speed 224" with 4.10 at 60 MPH, but a 289" would feel a bit thrashy at those RPM.

        Given how much pickups get engines, transmissions and rears swapped, it could have 4.10, 4.56, 4.88 or 5.12 rear gears

        It is possible to change to a Dana 60 and retain the Budd-style wheels which are an integral part of making the '55 E12 the best looking of all Studebaker pickups. (Having owned one for forty years, I'm not prejudiced on this at all.) At present, I'm running a Dana 60 with 4.10 gears and overdrive. That's about perfect for a pickup with 16" tires.

        If a CASO just wanted a running truck, then it's also possible to swap in a car Dana 44 with taller gears. The obvious answer is just repair the overdrive.

        jack vines
        PackardV8

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        • #5
          Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
          The '55 E12 with overdrive would usually have come with a 4.56 or 4.88 Timken rear axle. I drove my 4-speed 224" with 4.10 at 60 MPH, but a 289" would feel a bit thrashy at those RPM.

          Given how much pickups get engines, transmissions and rears swapped, it could have 4.10, 4.56, 4.88 or 5.12 rear gears

          It is possible to change to a Dana 60 and retain the Budd-style wheels which are an integral part of making the '55 E12 the best looking of all Studebaker pickups. (Having owned one for forty years, I'm not prejudiced on this at all.) At present, I'm running a Dana 60 with 4.10 gears and overdrive. That's about perfect for a pickup with 16" tires.

          If a CASO just wanted a running truck, then it's also possible to swap in a car Dana 44 with taller gears. The obvious answer is just repair the overdrive.

          jack vines
          Jack, you're right about the Budd style wheels. They make those trucks look fantastic.
          sals54

          Comment


          • #6
            I agree that the obvious answer is to repair the overdrive regardless of the rear axle ratio currently in the truck.
            RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

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            • #7
              I believe he retained the Budd wheel centers and had new rims built on them.
              KURTRUK
              (read it backwards)




              Nothing is politically right which is morally wrong. -A. Lincoln

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by kurtruk View Post
                I believe he retained the Budd wheel centers and had new rims built on them.
                That is the best of both worlds on the wheels. Best looking wheels with the ease of modern tires and no death threats from a split rim.
                sals54

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                • #9
                  Yes, I have a definite opinion on this for me and mine, but your truck, your money, your decision.

                  Originally posted by sals54 View Post
                  That is the best of both worlds on the wheels. Best looking wheels with the ease of modern tires and no death threats from a split rim.
                  Please, not you too, Sal; you supported the original style and now this ;>)

                  The 16" two-piece wheels used on '49-mid'56 Studebaker 3/4-ton trucks are NOT the same as a big truck split rim design. The 16" Studes have a solid, one piece retaining ring and in more than fifty years of owning and driving those trucks, I've never heard of one being a problem from anything other than terminal rust.

                  And no, it's difficult to retain the classic style while welding the original center into a one-piece drop center rim where the ID is much smaller in diameter. As with the truck we're discussing, too much of the center was cut away and deeply recessed. One can see the glimmer of the original center, but the look is gone.

                  As to 'the ease of modern tires', it's no problem to run today's best; Michelin 215/85-16" LTX radials on the original wheels. Been doing it forever.

                  jack vines, who's still running the original wheels.
                  Last edited by PackardV8; 12-20-2018, 08:10 AM.
                  PackardV8

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                  • #10
                    You're right Jack. I was thinking of the split rims. So, do the Budd rims use standard size tires? I don't know much about them. I just love the look. I've owned a couple of the 3/4 tons with those rims, but never had tire issues to deal with. I have seen the splits though, I still don't like them. I'm still scarred from seeing a guy fly about 10 feet in the air from standing on a split rim when it blew ! ! !
                    sals54

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                    • #11
                      Had a truck 3/4 t several yrs ago. 5.?? rear end so had carrier and ring and pinion changed to a 3.73 Didnt cost much and it was so much more pleasant!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by sals54 View Post
                        So, do the Budd rims use standard size tires?
                        Yes. The standard 215/85-16" truck tires are perfect for the Stude wheels.

                        Had a truck 3/4 t several yrs ago. 5.?? rear end so had carrier and ring and pinion changed to a 3.73 Didnt cost much and it was so much more pleasant!
                        It's likely this 3/4-t had a Dana 60. There are none higher than 4.10 for the Timken.

                        jack vines
                        PackardV8

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