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WTB: Used 289 Camshaft

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  • Engine: WTB: Used 289 Camshaft

    I'm looking for a used steel camshaft to fit a '56 289 engine. Lobe condition not important, but the rest of the shaft needs to be very serviceable.
    Last edited by 345 DeSoto; 12-06-2018, 12:06 PM.

  • #2
    Originally posted by 345 DeSoto View Post
    I'm looking for a used 289 camshaft to fit a '56 engine. Lobe condition not important, but the rest of the shaft needs to be very serviceable.
    Is this for a project involving welding? If so, you might be interested to learn some early '51-52 cams were steel. They usually can be identified by the copper plating between the lobes.

    All the later cams, '53-64 were cast iron and are similar. The very few R-series will have different casting numbers.

    jack vines
    PackardV8

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    • #3
      Thanks, Jack...going to do a Hydraulic Roller.
      Last edited by 345 DeSoto; 12-05-2018, 10:19 AM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by 345 DeSoto View Post
        Thanks, Jack...going to do a Hydraulic Roller.
        Interesting project. Who have you found to do the welding and grinding? My local cam grinder won't do welding any longer and Iskenderian stopped doing welded cams at least fifteen years ago.

        jack vines
        PackardV8

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        • #5
          Tony, are you having a cam welded as Jack says or are you having one custom ground? There are a few others of us that would like to acquire a hydraulic roller for our projects, so if you have a grinder willing to make them, maybe some of us others would send him some business. Do you have any info that might assist us? Thanks, Bill.

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          • #6
            The camshafts are the same from 289 to 259, not counting the later "super" engines.
            RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

            17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
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            56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
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            • #7
              Originally posted by Colgate Studebaker View Post
              Tony, are you having a cam welded as Jack says or are you having one custom ground? There are a few others of us that would like to acquire a hydraulic roller for our projects, so if you have a grinder willing to make them, maybe some of us others would send him some business. Do you have any info that might assist us? Thanks, Bill.
              While this is not an exact representation of the difference between a flat tappet and a roller lobe profile, it illustrates why it's not possible to grind a performance roller profile on a Studebaker flat tappet cam core; can't grind air.



              jack vines
              PackardV8

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              • #8
                I have several core's but when selecting a core last year i found all 6 cams had .oo1 gone off journals. i quit miking them and just picked one at random. PM me andlets talk "Turkey". Luck Doofus

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                • #9
                  JACK - Adding weld would add as many thousands to the lift on the lobes, as needed. Lobe lift would only be limited by the bearing diameter of the cam. A few thousands extra lift, and more beneficial duration would do wonders. Looking to add low end TQ, rather than high end HP.
                  Last edited by 345 DeSoto; 12-06-2018, 05:30 AM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by 345 DeSoto View Post
                    JACK - Adding weld would add as many thousands to the lift on the lobes, as needed. Lobe lift would only be limited by the bearing diameter of the cam. A few thousands extra lift, and more beneficial duration would do wonders. Looking to add low end TQ, rather than high end HP.
                    For true;, but share with us the cam grinder you have found who guarantees he can successfully build up that much weld on sixteen lobes, then straighten the resultant warpage and guarantee the weld won't begin to fatigue and flake off at the thin transition? My grinder won't do welds and Iskenderian quit doing their hardface overlay welded cams more than fifteen years ago.

                    jack vines
                    PackardV8

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                    • #11
                      Thanks for the graph Jack, I was inquiring if Tony in deed had a grinder that could weld up a flat tappet cam and regrind it as a roller. Secondly I was asking if he has a grinder that could grind rollers from solid material or some other manufacturers core. Sort of like Mike Van Veghten did a few years back. I sure wish there were more guys willing to cough up the cash to have Mike make another run. Bill

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                      • #12
                        If he is going to have it welded up for a hydraulic roller, he needs a 51-53 steel billet cam, not the later cast iron cam.

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                        • #13
                          "For true;, but share with us the cam grinder you have found who guarantees he can successfully build up that much weld on sixteen lobes, then straighten the resultant warpage and guarantee the weld won't begin to fatigue and flake off at the thin transition? My grinder won't do welds and Iskenderian quit doing their hardface overlay welded cams more than fifteen years ago."

                          Jack Vines - Donny Johansson is my go to Cam guy. Been on the phone with him for the last week now. Four ways to go...his billet Studebaker steel cam welded lobes, then reground. New billet 9310 steel, custom ground. Tool steel 6065 steel, custom ground. Minimum 10 cam order custom ground...

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                          • #14
                            If there WERE 10 people who would spring for a new Hydraulic Roller they'd be somewhat cheaper...but they wouldn't be $100 cams. Mine will be more or less the same Studebaker cam, but with more lift and duration, a bit more punch and much better low end TQ...still entirely streetable. Specs are still being worked on.
                            Last edited by 345 DeSoto; 12-06-2018, 12:07 PM.

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                            • #15
                              For years now Ford has used a modular cam. Basically the lobes slide on a common serrated shaft. After placement a ball is pulled through the center of the shaft locking the lobes. I'm wondering if cam manufactures consider this the future. A common shaft (of different lengths - as needed) could be used. The journals and lobes (distributor gear, if needed) can just be properly spaced and then "fixed." There probably isn't too much difference in base circles that a common lobe might work for a fair number of engines.

                              So, one shaft (cut to length as needed), lobes that fit a variety of engines and only the journals and spacing would be different. Reground or welded and reground cams might be a thing of the past. If Ford is doing this for production engines it should be cost effective. The question is, will the primarily elderly Studebaker crowd live to see the day???
                              '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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