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Main and rod bearings

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  • #61
    I got mine from Bob Ziff at avantiparts.biz, but Myers Studebaker, Dave Thiebault, Fairborn Studebaker and I am sure many others have them. Just be sure to getUS made trimetal. There is one well known vendor who has a mix of bearings, but will tell you if you ask.
    Ron Dame
    '63 Champ

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    • #62
      BAH! The engine is almost together. Yeah, it's taken months, but with the busted cam, the stripped crank nose threads, bad weather and the flu, well, there you go.
      So today's task was to get the manifolds on, water pump, supercharger bracket, valve covers, etc, so I could plug this lump back in place tomorrow. Not gonna happen.

      When I went to install the breather tube on the oil pan, I found the lughead who'd messed with this thing in the past had stripped two of the three holes in the pan. Clearly, after spending a lot of time and care to get teh pan gaskets in place correctly, I'd just as soon not pull it off to either enlarge or to even try a helicoil.

      So has anyone tried the Loctite stripped thread compound? This isn't exatcly a high torque application, so I am encouraged. What do you all think, or does anyone have a better suggestion?
      Ron Dame
      '63 Champ

      Comment


      • #63
        I think that is an application that Loctite thread restore used to claim it was meant for. But I have no personal or even 2nd person experience either way. That said, I'm thinking the helicoil tap drill and probably even the tap should fit thru the pan hole.

        I'm not sure what I'd do in your situation.
        Are the bad holes all in a row? Are they accessible easily from under the car if the Loctite does not work long term?

        If they are hard to get at in the car I'd be leaning heavily towards a heli-coil right now. I'm no fan of just oversizing tapped holes.

        Comment


        • #64
          I'll leave the final words to Jack, Jeff and the others experienced folks here but IIWM, It take the pan off and repair it. I know that is not what you may want to hear but my vision is there are very few threads into the pan and I'd want a deeper hole if I were to attempt to use the Locktite product. Hopefully someone that has done the repair will answer.

          I'd also be leery about a larger tap as even with grease you can't guarantee a few shavings won't find there way into the pan.

          Good luck, you've come a long way - Bob

          Comment


          • #65
            Originally posted by sweetolbob View Post
            I'll leave the final words to Jack, Jeff and the others experienced folks here but IIWM, It take the pan off and repair it. I know that is not what you may want to hear but my vision is there are very few threads into the pan and I'd want a deeper hole if I were to attempt to use the Locktite product. Hopefully someone that has done the repair will answer.


            I'd also be leery about a larger tap as even with grease you can't guarantee a few shavings won't find there way into the pan.

            Good luck, you've come a long way - Bob
            That's my concern too, there is a plate, maybe 1/8" thick that has the threads. And then there is the windage tray that's in the way no matter what. How about a helicoil?
            Ron Dame
            '63 Champ

            Comment


            • #66
              Pull the pan, tack nuts to the thread plate, good quality nuts! you will thank yourself later. Ask me how i know, i had the same problem. Thread restorer worked for some time, but a small leak kept bugging me till i did it right. Luck Doofus

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              • #67
                Originally posted by doofus View Post
                Pull the pan, tack nuts to the thread plate, good quality nuts! you will thank yourself later. Ask me how i know, i had the same problem. Thread restorer worked for some time, but a small leak kept bugging me till i did it right. Luck Doofus
                there is a baffle in the way that keeps oil from being churned up into the breather, so it would have to be at free and rewelded. I don't want to do a half assed job now, but really, really don't want to go this far if I can find an acceptable alternative.
                Ron Dame
                '63 Champ

                Comment


                • #68
                  If you use a helicoil you will need to drill out the threads. I'm again leery about a helicoil working in this thin a metal.

                  If you are willing to drill, look into nutserts also called rivet nuts. Use locktite to be sure they are sealed. I use them all the time to put threads in thin metal, they are a staple in my selection of fasteners. They are available many places on-line.

                  https://www.jhpfasteners.com/rivet-nuts.html

                  I'd still probably pull the pan but you can use grease on a slow drill to hopefully collect the chips. If you are still on the engine stand, rotate they engine so you are drilling up into the pan with a greased drill and then take a pipe cleaner with grease on it with a 90 degree bend and swab around the inside of the drilled hole to be sure you, hopefully, get any chips that may have escaped.

                  Bob
                  Last edited by sweetolbob; 02-10-2019, 05:06 AM.

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                  • #69
                    OK, you guys won.. sort of. First off, my garage is a 21 x 21 wooden POS with a concrete paver floor from the late 1940's, and is jam packed. But it's dry. So I pulled the pan off, then drilled the spot welds holding the baffle in place and cleaned things up.

                    Now to the welder: Where the hell is it, what else in this Rubiks cube do I need to move to get it out? 15 minutes later, it's out, the Avanti is buried in containers and boxes and whatever, but here we go! Well, no, the wire is stuck to the contact. OK, that's fixed, but what is wrong with the wire feed? Oh yeah, it screwed up last time I used it and that's why the wire was burnt to the contact tip. Futz about for another 30 minutes getting the wire feed straightened out, but damn, I left the gas on and the tank is empty.

                    So I rummage about some more and found my old Harbor Freight flux core welder. I made a few big sparks but failed to actually stick anything together before it crapped out completely. Damn!

                    JB Weld to the rescue! Screw it, I've got new nuts epoxied to the pan, the baffle epoxied back in place, and Bob's yer uncle. Sue me!

                    I told y'all I really did not want to go so far as to weld nuts in place!
                    Ron Dame
                    '63 Champ

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      I'm down to the final stretch on this. Weather, flu, and general bad attitude has kept me out of the garage for a while. I still wonder who messed up the labels on my carefully bagged and labeled parts and switched a bunch of stuff around, and where the heck some of those fasteners are! But I digress, I've floundered through it.

                      I was installing the alternator, and the condenser wire broke off. That just figures. What is the capacitance of that, and could I be lucky enough to be able to substitute and in ignition capacitor?
                      Ron Dame
                      '63 Champ

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Just leave it OFF, your Radio if it works will not know the difference!

                        And if it does, you can always leave it turned OFF until you find the right Radio Static Condenser.
                        StudeRich
                        Second Generation Stude Driver,
                        Proud '54 Starliner Owner

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          I don't f%&(ing believe it!

                          After cam run in, everything was fine. Temps were good, oil, water, and trans fluid all looked good, no leaks. I've spent time putting the rest of the crap on under the hood and reinstalling the hood. It's moved in the driveway some, not enough to even warm up.

                          I backed it out just now, ready to go for a drive, took the rad cap off, and there is oil in the water (no antifreeze yet) Oil and trans fluid look fine, but brown peanut butter in the expansion tank.

                          Dammit! the heads were cleaned up, the block squared, Copper Coat was put on the shim style head gaskets, and everything torqued to spec.

                          I am so sick of this car.

                          Give me some ideas, and you can make offers on it too. I'm done.
                          Ron Dame
                          '63 Champ

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            We feel your pain, Ron.

                            There are limited paths for oil to combine with water. It is usually because oil under full pressure is near a water passage.

                            First question; did you reinstall the head locating bushings in all four locations in the block decks?

                            Was the block pressure tested?

                            What is the bore diameter?

                            jack vines
                            PackardV8

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              Block was NOT pressure tested, that did not seem to be an issue before. Heads were pressure tested. Block went to onlyv0.030" over stock. Locating bushings are in place. It took forever to find where I had stashed them, but I finally did and used them.

                              Question: About torque on steel shim gaskets: Any different than the manual specifies? Do I need to retorque? (I plan to anyway) Should I pull the heads and install new gaskets? I did use copper coat on the gaskets.


                              Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
                              We feel your pain, Ron.

                              There are limited paths for oil to combine with water. It is usually because oil under full pressure is near a water passage.

                              First question; did you reinstall the head locating bushings in all four locations in the block decks?

                              Was the block pressure tested?

                              What is the bore diameter?

                              jack vines
                              Ron Dame
                              '63 Champ

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Taking apart the engine again is not what you wanted to do, but sometimes it's not necessary; sometimes it is.

                                It's not possible to pressure test the oiling system, because it's designed with about forty controlled leaks. However, the cooling system is supposed to hold pressure without leaks. if oil is getting into the water, the cooling system can be pressure tested and theoretically, the leak can then go from water into the oil. Consider draining the cooling system and using the tester which replaces the radiator cap and is pumped up to 15 or so PSI. The air pressure should then leak wherever the oil had been coming in. Problem is finding it. Best case, it's in the head gasket and can be heard and found, If not, remove the rocker covers; is it there? Then remove the intake and the valley cover; is the leak in there? If not, in turn remove the pan, the bell housing, the timing cover, until the leak source is identified.

                                An improved method is to drain the cooling system, remove the upper and lower radiator hoses, cap the water pump outlet. We have a metal plate with holes matching the thermostat outlet with a quick disconnect air hose fitting. We can pressurize the block to 30-40 PSI and that makes the leaks even easier to find.

                                jack vines
                                PackardV8

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