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Rear seal on 1941 Champion

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  • Engine: Rear seal on 1941 Champion

    It's me again. This time my problem is the rear engine seal in my 1941 Champion. My mechanic won't mess with it because he hasn't had experience with that kind of seal. Another mechanic says the engine will have to be pulled. Does anyone have any suggestions? Can the original type (rope) seal be replaced with some kind of plastic seal? Thanks for any help.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Sam Ensley View Post
    It's me again. This time my problem is the rear engine seal in my 1941 Champion. My mechanic won't mess with it because he hasn't had experience with that kind of seal. Another mechanic says the engine will have to be pulled. Does anyone have any suggestions? Can the original type (rope) seal be replaced with some kind of plastic seal? Thanks for any help.
    What rope seal? Studebaker didn't use a rope seal on this, or any other engines past the very early 30's, that I'm aware of. The real main seal for this engine comprised 2 wooden sticks and two small rectangular shaped pieces of rubber.

    Now, if it has a 47, or later champion engine crankshaft installed, then it would have the rubber 1 piece type seal (replacement is 2 piece, now a days). But, still, no rope seal.
    Last edited by Bo Markham; 09-06-2018, 09:06 AM.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Bo Markham View Post
      What rope seal? Studebaker didn't use a rope seal on this, or any other engines past the very early 30's, that I'm aware of. The real main seal for this engine comprised 2 wooden sticks and two small rectangular shaped pieces of rubber.

      Now, if it has a 47, or later champion engine installed, then it would have the rubber 1 piece type seal (replacement is 2 piece, now a days). But, still, no rope seal.
      I am obviously pretty dumb on mechanics. Your statement made me remember hearing my father talk about those sticks. It was my mechanic who mentioned the "rope." He admitted that he was baffled on it. It didn't leak before the transmission was changed. I will dig out my manual and take it to him.

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      • #4
        I think you will have to pull the engine. I don't think there is a way to get the oil pan off with the engine in the car. Maybe if you lifted it a few inches but at that point why not lift it a few more and work on a stand?
        _______________
        http://stude.vonadatech.com
        https://jeepster.vonadatech.com

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        • #5
          Early Champion had a oil slinger just as all prewar engines.
          It would leak a few drops of oil when the engine stopped.
          Remember the old driveways had a grass strip in the middle to absorb the oil!
          In 1947 Studebaker supplied a kit with the newer crank that would take a rubber seal.
          I believe that was a one piece seal made by Victor.
          The kit was used on the older Champion engines to replace the oil slinger type crank.
          Later they went to a 2 piece Brummer seal on all engines.
          An oil slinger is a cupped washer that simply would sling the oil that made it past the rear bearing , back into the crankcase by centrifugal force.
          The more wear on the engine it simply would sling more oil.
          When the engine stopped a drop of oil would drip on the ground because there was no longer a centrifugal force and whatever oil there was on the slinger would drip.
          So on the 1939-42 Champion there was no rear main seal but many engines were retrofitted with 1947 and later cranks.
          http://www.studebaker-info.org/text3...orum26263.html
          Last edited by rkapteyn; 09-06-2018, 06:49 AM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Sam Ensley View Post
            I am obviously pretty dumb on mechanics. Your statement made me remember hearing my father talk about those sticks. It was my mechanic who mentioned the "rope." He admitted that he was baffled on it. It didn't leak before the transmission was changed. I will dig out my manual and take it to him.
            Well sir, I'd say bring it down here and let us take it out and do the job, as we do have experience with these engines. But, that would be your call, your mechanic, your money. Trying to do this particular job in frame is a real PITA and usually results in having to take it out and doing the job a 2d time to get every thing seated and sealed correctly.

            As for leaking, it should have left a few drops on the floor/ground after turning the engine off, due to the type of system the engine had (oil slinger). That is and unless some one did the smart thing at some point in the past and did change out the crankshaft, as I indicated in my post to you earlier.

            You mentioned it didn't leak prior to the transmission being R&R'd. Not sure what that might have to do with the engine suddenly leaking, unless something has displaced the crankshaft (some how???) and/or the rear main cap (again some how???) and broke lose the sticks and/or rubber pieces.

            Another possibility that comes to mind? Is it leaking from the rear main, or the pan??? Has the pan seal been disturbed/ loosened, thus breaking the seal of the rear pan lip???

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