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Head Bolts

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  • Engine: Head Bolts

    Good morning. Is there anything special about a head bolt for the 259? The threads are 7/16-14 and they are 3-9/16 long or 4-1/4 long. Can I use a standard grade bolt for this? They are kinda hard to find and at $6 a part, they are expensive.

  • #2
    I wouldn't use hardware store bolts, which might come from China.
    Hopefully someone here has original bolts at a good price.
    Most hardware store bolts don't have the same strength and tolerance fit as original hardware.

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    • #3
      No...do not use anything but the Stude fasteners or even more expensive studs from ARP.
      Yes, they ARE a special, high tensile strength material, as are the main cap fasteners.

      Mike

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      • #4
        Yes, just put out a WTB here and you'll be buried in offers to sell you head bolts for considerably less than $6 each.

        jack vines
        PackardV8

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        • #5
          Be thankful we don't have modern (mostly import) bolts which are torque to yield and have to be thrown away after each usage. I don't get it why they are supposedly better than the old tried and true bolts which we have used for decades. Obviously an inspection and thorough thread cleaning is required so you don't use rusty or otherwise compromised units. I dip mine in fresh motor oil prior to torquing.
          Bill

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Tjohnston View Post
            Good morning. Is there anything special about a head bolt for the 259? The threads are 7/16-14 and they are 3-9/16 long or 4-1/4 long. Can I use a standard grade bolt for this? They are kinda hard to find and at $6 a part, they are expensive.
            If you'll excuse my ignorance, but I have to wonder why modern grade 8 bolts, available everywhere, aren't at least as good as the original genuine Studebaker bolts? Did Studebaker, 60+ years ago, use better/stronger bolts?

            A grade 8 bolt is stronger than the more commonly used grade 5. It is made of alloy steel and has six radial lines on the top of the bolt head. Grade 8 bolts have a tensile strength of 150,000 pounds per square inch.

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            • #7
              Studebaker bolts are induction hardened, and are tough. they ring like a nickelson file if you rap on one. They are hard on the outside and softer in the middle, so they are neither hardware grade nor grade 8 .
              Bez Auto Alchemy
              573-318-8948
              http://bezautoalchemy.com


              "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

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              • #8
                I was long ahead trained the bolts are disposable. One use and they are discarded due to elongation and thread damage. But I have seen and heard people reuse these fasteners in the motor. According to bezhawk that is acceptable. Thanks, that makes life much easier

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Tjohnston View Post
                  I was long ahead trained the bolts are disposable. One use and they are discarded due to elongation and thread damage. But I have seen and heard people reuse these fasteners in the motor. According to bezhawk that is acceptable. Thanks, that makes life much easier


                  The one time stretch bolts are particular to certain engines. My first knowledge came with the early Honda Civic's. They had a leaking head gasket problem and it seems those type of bolts helped. I have a turbo 2.3 T-Bird Turbo Coupe engine in my Pinto. If you have older, non-stretch bolts they are reusable. But the dealer only sells the stretch bolts today. 10 years ago they were about $25 for the set.

                  I'd be curious to know why regular bolt works in some engines and others need the stretch bolts? I had though that iron blocks/aluminum heads might be the reason but in the case of the Ford 2.3 they are both iron. Question? I've heard of "cold stabilizing" axles by packing them in dry ice. Would that be any benefit to to used head bolts? Just curious.
                  '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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