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  • #16
    Dwain "maybe' " i think' 'I heard" "not sure' If they do !!!

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Dwain G. View Post
      Anyone here own a set of tappet wrenches? (Google it)
      Sure do. Kent Moore (Studebaker Factory) version, Snap-On and even an old set of Craftsman. Come in really handy adjusting those silly tappets.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Dwain G. View Post
        Anyone here own a set of tappet wrenches? (Google it)
        This has been an entertaining conversation. It is a good example of how our "Studebaker Personalities" make us susceptible to taking a tiny subject and exploring it excessively. Spelling aside, English "phonetic" characteristic of the word "Tappet," could easily associate all the components of a solid lifter valve train in operation. When it is properly adjusted and in action, the sound of these engines is a gentle rhythmic tap tap tap.

        Observe the components in action, and it is easy to see how one could associate the word tappet with a rocker, lifter, push rod, or the contact point/end of a valve. Back in the late 1970's to early '80's, I sold industrial tooling to several new "start-up" manufacturing plants in my southeast region. I sold complete tool room packages from the tool-crib enclosure to tool cabinets (Lyons), workstations (Kennedy) and the assembly of hand tool packages (Armstrong).

        My economic fall back line of tools was Craftsman when they had a separate "industrial" division. However, during that time, some so-called marketing genius came up with the idea of doing away with the "lifetime" guarantee for Craftsman tools if they were used in a manufacturing and industrial facility. What a disaster! (Anybody remember the "New Coke" fiasco?) I think the rule was reversed.

        Anyway, the only Armstrong wrench in my toolbox is a long-handled 9/16" combination wrench. (I now wish I had bought more.) My belief for designated "tappet wrenches" is that they were mainly built for the era of solid lifter engines where the rule of the day was to adjust valves while the engines were running and the thin wrench heads were needed for the closeness of the adjustment clearances between the jam/lock nut to the lands of the adjuster. The long handles help with the mechanic's reach while leaning over the fender and under the hood of the car. Depending on idle speed, theoretically, perhaps a little protection from oil splatter. (Wishful thinking)

        If you are not familiar with the Armstrong tool brand, I'm not surprised. In fact, I didn't until I began my industrial sales job. I have never seen them in retail stores, and don't even know if they are still being offered. However, I remember that, back in the day, my competitors were Proto, Williams, and a couple of others I can't recall. My experience was that they were mainly for industrial applications, were top notch, and quick to respond to any tooling problem or failure of any kind. Request for special tools was handled with the intensity of brain surgery.
        So, if you have managed to read this post, this is my contribution to "tappets." If a tappet wrench is any wrench that fits...then I have a bunch of 'em!

        John Clary
        Greer, SC

        SDC member since 1975

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        • #19
          Originally posted by jclary View Post
          Spelling aside, English "phonetic" characteristic of the word "Tappet," could easily associate all the components of a solid lifter valve train in operation.

          [Sorry, John, but "tappet" refers to a single part of the valve train, perhaps more easily understood when it is called a cam follower.]

          Tappet definition and meaning | Collins English Dictionary
          https://www.collinsdictionary.com/us...english/tappet

          [A tappet is the part of an engine gear train that converts cam lift into linear reciprocating (= up and down) movement which it transmits to the valve.]

          [A "tappet" is not a "rocker" or "push rod".]



          Anyway, the only Armstrong wrench in my toolbox is a long-handled 9/16" combination wrench. (I now wish I had bought more.) My belief for designated "tappet wrenches" is that they were mainly built for the era of solid lifter engines where the rule of the day was to adjust valves while the engines were running.

          [Rule of the day? No. Yes, some mechanics adjusted tappet clearances by ear with the engine running, but the better engine builders did not and do not, and AFAIK, no manufacturer ever recommended that method.

          And "tappet wrenches" are long and slender to reach into sometimes close quarters.]
          ...........
          Last edited by jnormanh; 08-16-2018, 05:53 AM.

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          • #20
            My father gave me his thin headed tappet wrench and his 10" long tappet gauges in .021" and .025 " thicknesses that he had bought for his 1964 Daytona station wagon back when it was new in 1963. I remember him putting newspaper down on the driveway and getting oil all over what seemed like everywhere at least twice a year for the time he had the car. I used them 3 weeks ago when I last set up my Avanti's lifters. Much better than "crank them down until the ticking goes away"...

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