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Studebaker Instrument panel clock service

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  • Speedo/Tach/Gauges: Studebaker Instrument panel clock service

    Hi All,

    It was bugging me that the clock was not working so I thought investigating while doing a 59 Caddy clock for a friend I blogged about it on my site https://mitka.co.uk/2018/08/10/servi...debaker-clock/

  • #2
    Thanks for sharing! It is very helpful. I might have another look at my clock, now. If I understand well, you filed the ratchet to get clean grooves, is that it?
    Nice evening to all.
    sigpic

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    • #3
      Originally posted by christophe View Post
      Thanks for sharing! It is very helpful. I might have another look at my clock, now. If I understand well, you filed the ratchet to get clean grooves, is that it?
      Nice evening to all.
      Glad you liked it! Look at how the click (stopping lever) engages with the ratchet wheel teeth. My click had a worn rounded tip. You want it fairly sharp so it engages with the ratchet wheel teeth. You would also want to clean pivots and pivot holes and other dirt as this will wear down the movement causing it to fail at one point. Let me know if you have any issues

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      • #4
        Thanks for the details. I already opened my clock once. It worked again after cleaning the points. Unfortunately, I think now I goofed the next step by using too much oil. The ratchet does not engage anymore. I'll tackle this job during next winter. Thanks again for this detailed tutorial.
        Nice day to all.
        sigpic

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        • #5
          Originally posted by christophe View Post
          Thanks for the details. I already opened my clock once. It worked again after cleaning the points. Unfortunately, I think now I goofed the next step by using too much oil. The ratchet does not engage anymore. I'll tackle this job during next winter. Thanks again for this detailed tutorial.
          Nice day to all.
          Too much oil is not great! you only want a little drop and no dirt! My expensive Mobius oils are a little overkill any pocket watch grade oil from e-bay would work. If the bushes are worn you got a bigger job on your hands. No oil on hairspring as it will stick together making it run worse! Good luck

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          • #6
            The clock in my 48 Champion worked when the car was being driven, but not when parked for more than a few hours. I assumed it needed cleaning and lubrication. The clock was right in the center in front of the driver, a perfect location for the most important instrument. After some careful analysis, I decided that, now I am retired and really don't care what time it is, the clock is NOT the most important instrument. I replaced it with a tachometer, which seems somehow much more useful. Nevertheless, I admire your work, good that someone retains those skills.

            In a previous life I restored an MG TC, which had those bizarre "racheting" speedo and tach instruments which I never understood. Ever work on those?
            Trying to build a 48 Studebaker for the 21st century.
            See more of my projects at stilettoman.info

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            • #7
              Originally posted by 48skyliner View Post
              The clock in my 48 Champion worked when the car was being driven, but not when parked for more than a few hours. I assumed it needed cleaning and lubrication. The clock was right in the center in front of the driver, a perfect location for the most important instrument. After some careful analysis, I decided that, now I am retired and really don't care what time it is, the clock is NOT the most important instrument. I replaced it with a tachometer, which seems somehow much more useful. Nevertheless, I admire your work, good that someone retains those skills.

              In a previous life I restored an MG TC, which had those bizarre "racheting" speedo and tach instruments which I never understood. Ever work on those?
              I'm a watchmaker by trade so it was important my car clock works I have no experience with other instruments!

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