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Electric fuel pump on Hawk, Avanti

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  • Fuel System: Electric fuel pump on Hawk, Avanti

    Okay, after years of priming the carburetor with gasoline before cranking various engines (V-8's and 6's) to start, I got the brilliant idea to put a cheap ($10.95) made in China (Amazon) electric fuel pump in the fuel line near the rear wheel of my most recent re-build, a 1957 President Classic. This was simple, quick, and works great with a little toggle switch hidden below the instrument panel. So, I thought, why not repeat the same thing in my Sky Hawk and Avanti? The Sky Hawk should have the same 120" frame as the President, so it should be simple, since the running gear should be essentially the same. NOT SO! The outer space between the frame and the body of the Sky Hawk is "boxed in" with steel, somewhat like the Avanti "hog troughs". but different, so there is no way to place the electric fuel pump outside the frame and under the floor of the body so it wouldn't hang down about 3 inches below the "box". Same deal with the Avanti. I suppose this could be cut away, reducing the rigidity of the body, which is bad enough on these "hardtops" anyway. Attached is a photo of my installation on the President, which is not noticeable unless one is lying on the ground. Does anyone have any ideas on how to put a "cheap" but "invisible" supplementary electric fuel pump on a Hawk or Avanti? The mechanical fuel pumps are ok, but the gas in the carburetor bowl evaporates, even the gas 20 years ago did the same, making prolonged cranking necessary unless the car was driven frequently. I have had the Hawk since 1970.

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    sigpic
    Jack, in Montana

  • #2
    On my Avanti, I used the exhaust hanger that comes from the frame just behind the front spring mount. The pump mounts above the hanger so that it is well clear of any possible damage from road debris and inside the frame should I be hit from the right.

    Ken

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    • #3
      Here's the electric fuel pump mounted on my Avanti. The car has EFI so it has fuel lines rated for fuel injection.
      Poet...Mystic...Soldier of Fortune. As always...self-absorbed, adversarial, cocky and in general a malcontent.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Gunslinger View Post
        Here's the electric fuel pump mounted on my Avanti. The car has EFI so it has fuel lines rated for fuel injection.
        Yup!! - I mounted the pumps on both my 74 and 83 in about the same location. I ran mine down the outside of the frame to maintain the drain but that's just a minor detail.

        Bob
        , ,

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        • #5
          Here's where I mounted an electric pump on my Hawk. The stock fuel line runs on the outside of the frame, and pump is mounted just forward of the rear spring mount. Works great, just be sure to empty the tank before cutting the fuel line.
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          • #6
            After inspecting things again, it appears that the beat (only) place to mount the electric fuel pump on my Avanti and Sky Hawk would be under the gas tank and above the differential. Since I do not have a lift which would allow the rear wheels to hang down, I will need to take it to a shop after the gas tank is almost empty (which may be months the amount I drive them). For the immediate future, I'll continue to drip a small amount of gas into the carburetor before starting, unless I drive each car every week. The fuel lines on these cars are attached outside of the left frame rail, with the frame being boxed in with undercoated thin steel.
            sigpic
            Jack, in Montana

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            • #7
              Originally posted by jnfweber View Post
              After inspecting things again, it appears that the beat (only) place to mount the electric fuel pump on my Avanti and Sky Hawk would be under the gas tank and above the differential. The fuel lines on these cars are attached outside of the left frame rail, with the frame being boxed in with undercoated thin steel.
              Exactly as my Hawk. Why make it more difficult than it needs to be? Pump mounted to frame rail is easy and works great.
              sigpic

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              • #8
                Originally posted by bensherb View Post
                Here's where I mounted an electric pump on my Hawk. The stock fuel line runs on the outside of the frame, and pump is mounted just forward of the rear spring mount. Works great, just be sure to empty the tank before cutting the fuel line.
                [ATTACH=CONFIG]74075[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]74076[/ATTACH]
                That's pretty much where I mounted the ones on my 54 wagon and 60 convertible
                RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

                17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
                10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
                10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
                4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
                5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
                56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
                60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

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                • #9
                  If you decide to install an electric pump, spend a bit more and get a self priming one rather than a vane type. If the later goes dry it will not work unless you prime it. I have recently switched to a Bosch pump that fits an 84 or so Honda (carbureted) Instead of wiring it to the ignition circuit, I put a splitter on the acc terminal of the fan and put a switch under the panel just to the pass side of it. If the car has set for a few days the carb will probably be dry so you car switch to acc, turn the pump on for a few seconds, And it will start right up. On acc you won't burn the points. This is bound to save starters too as , with an electric pump, you can get gas up carb without grinding away on the starter for 30 sec or more. I switch it off for driving but it is there and available just in case. I put it inside the frame rail towards the back. I wouldn't place one above the level of the tank. And put a filter on the tank side of the pump!

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                  • #10
                    I have a Carter 6 volt rotary vane pump, and 2 Holley 12 volt rotary vane pumps, and they all prime fine, even when mounted up front by the original mechanical pump mounting.

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                    • #11
                      I mounted mine on the passanger side of the firewall low down as I'm gonna use Josephine all year & don't want to much snow & salt messing up the electrics.
                      It works fine & I rather have it in the engine compartment, but that's me...

                      My thought about the #1 posting / Jack, is that those blue plastic electric connectors are bound to fail, they do let in water... either put some grease in them to keep the humidity out or even better: seal them.
                      sigpic

                      Josephine
                      -55
                      Champion V8
                      4d sedan

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                      • #12
                        My S-I P/N 800250 electric fuel pump is mounted on my 1962 GT Hawk over the differential where the slanted section goes from the floor to the top (hard to describe in words!) In-line filters were installed before the pump and just before the carburetor, and the gas line runs along the frame on the driver's side.

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                        Last edited by 56GH; 07-29-2018, 06:50 PM. Reason: Additional info
                        Bill L.
                        1962 GT Hawk

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                        • #13
                          Helping a friend with a 53 coupe. The fuel injection gerotor pumps manufacturer requests the pump to be lower than the fuel supply. We fabricated a bracket to attach to the fuel tank flange, behind the differential and in front of the tank. It retains the prefilter as well as the pump.

                          The tank being in a higher location on an Avanti, Gunslinger and Bob's pumps mounting meet that specification. That same location would not on a Hawk.
                          sigpic 1963 Studebaker Avanti: LS1 motor and T-56 transmission have been moved rearward, set up as a two seat coupe with independent rear suspension. Complex solutions for nonexistant problems.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by bensherb View Post
                            Here's where I mounted an electric pump on my Hawk. The stock fuel line runs on the outside of the frame, and pump is mounted just forward of the rear spring mount. Works great, just be sure to empty the tank before cutting the fuel line.
                            [ATTACH=CONFIG]74075[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]74076[/ATTACH]
                            It looks like the torque box (hog trough) on your Hawk has been cut out so you could mount the fuel pump along side the left side of the frame rail. On my Sky Hawk, this metal extends from the rocker panel to the left side of the frame rail for the entire length of the body. This is about the same situation on my Avanti. I took some photos under the Hawk to illustrate.

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                            The photos 1-3 are from front to back under the left side of the car. The first shows a hole I punched many years ago to attach the outside driver's seat belt, just along the front seat. The second is about the middle of the car, and the third photo is near the rear, showing the gas line going up to the gas tank above the rear left axel. There is not much space there for a fuel pump, any location forward of that would hang down below the "torque box" which must have been added to this model of Hawk for frame stability. Without cutting into this "box", it appears the only other place to put an electric fuel pump would be under the gas tank and above the differential. This would require a body lift which would allow the rear wheels to hang down to give clearance to install the fuel pump behind it and in front of the gas tank. I do not have a lift, and will probably end up taking it to a commercial shop to have it installed, which would make it an expensive project for this CASO who is mostly a do-it-myself shade tree mechanic.
                            sigpic
                            Jack, in Montana

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jnfweber View Post
                              It looks like the torque box (hog trough) on your Hawk has been cut out so you could mount the fuel pump along side the left side of the frame rail. On my Sky Hawk, this metal extends from the rocker panel to the left side of the frame rail for the entire length of the body. This is about the same situation on my Avanti. I took some photos under the Hawk to illustrate.

                              [ATTACH=CONFIG]74198[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]74199[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]74200[/ATTACH]

                              The photos 1-3 are from front to back under the left side of the car. The first shows a hole I punched many years ago to attach the outside driver's seat belt, just along the front seat. The second is about the middle of the car, and the third photo is near the rear, showing the gas line going up to the gas tank above the rear left axel. There is not much space there for a fuel pump, any location forward of that would hang down below the "torque box" which must have been added to this model of Hawk for frame stability. Without cutting into this "box", it appears the only other place to put an electric fuel pump would be under the gas tank and above the differential. This would require a body lift which would allow the rear wheels to hang down to give clearance to install the fuel pump behind it and in front of the gas tank. I do not have a lift, and will probably end up taking it to a commercial shop to have it installed, which would make it an expensive project for this CASO who is mostly a do-it-myself shade tree mechanic.

                              Interesting. None of the 5 Studes weve had; '53,'56,62 c/k, '53 sedan, '61 lark; have ever had anything like that on them.
                              sigpic

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