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Electric Fuel pump for priming needs ONLY

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  • Fuel System: Electric Fuel pump for priming needs ONLY

    Hello Members/ Owners--- An Elec fuel pump, I understand, assists priming/ starting-- What all is needed-----is it just a pump and a fuse --or are there other key components items needed to complete installation.......The effort is not for vapor lock abatement....Thank U all...

  • #2
    Need a switch. Pump should be located as close to the tank as possible, as electric pumps push better then they pull. Nice part of having the electric as a back-up, is that it will solve a vapor lock problem if one arises, plus the ability to prime the carburetor if the car has not been driven for awhile.
    sigpic1966 Daytona (The First One)
    1950 Champion Convertible
    1950 Champion 4Dr
    1955 President 2 Dr Hardtop
    1957 Thunderbird

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    • #3
      This one looks like the kind I bought. I used the low pressure one so as not to need a fuel pressure regulator.

      https://www.ebay.com/itm/Gas-Diesel-...sid=m570.l1313
      RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

      17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
      10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
      10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
      4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
      5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
      56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
      60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

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      • #4
        I would use a momentary contact switch so you don't forget and leave it on. Or you can take the simpler approach and put a rubber priming bulb from an outboard motor fuel line in there. A couple of squeezes and you should be good to go. Just don't put it near anything hot.
        _______________
        http://stude.vonadatech.com
        https://jeepster.vonadatech.com

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        • #5
          Electric fuel pumps are novelty I do like novelties, I have a V8 in my 54 Champion, I have two fuel sediment glass bowels, I have two 6 volt batteries wired independently to the starter, I have a push button starter, I have fog lights, these are all novelties. I purchased an electric fuel pump some years ago however never installed it because I could not determine any advantage therefore it still sits in the original box. I bought some parts one time and in the mix there was a box of vacuum fuel pumps, most had compromised diaphragms. I purchased several new rebuild kits and replaced the insides of the several of the failed units. To test the fuel pumps I attached a hose to the inlet and into a container of solvent and with 3-4 strokes the fuel would squirt 6-8 feet with gusto. I have one of the fuel pumps on my V8. I had removed the fuel delivery system from the pump to the carb for some maintenance and after I reinstalled it, it only took a few cranking revolutions to refill the two fuel bowels and fire the engine. I still like the novelty of an electric fuel pump but I still feel it will do no more than the vacuum pump (in good condition). Even after sitting a while my vacuum pump comes to life immediately. However for an instant start I do have a squeeze bottle handy.

          Somewhat earlier in the life of this project I was plagued with starting problems, I had a ground problem with my starter, too small a wire size, weak fuel pump and a pin hole in the fuel line from the tank and I was looking very seriously at an electric fuel pump and it would have most likely solved all my problems at the time. All sound components was the best cure.

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          • #6
            I think with today's lousy gas a primer pump is a great scheme. I would be very careful to purchase one that allows "flow-thru" so when you shut the electric one off the manual pump can pull gas thru it. Not all electric pumps allow this you can waste a lot of time on installation that must be repeated; don't ask how I know this !

            BTW, I love to buy from Studebaker International but there electric pump has almost zero info on voltage, Positivre-negative ground or flow thru and no one there can describe what they are selling.

            Murray
            Life isn't about how to survive the storm, but how to dance in the rain !

            http://sites.google.com/site/intrigu...tivehistories/

            (/url) https://goo.gl/photos/ABBDQLgZk9DyJGgr5

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            • #7
              Our '50 champion was plagued by vapor lock during the hot months until I installed an electric pump on it as an assist. Anytime we made a quick pit stop in really hot weather I'd flip the switch & then no worries.
              Mike Sal

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              • #8
                I'm using a pump like the one Roy posted the link for, it works well. Easy to install, black wire to - red wire to +. Mounted to frame just forward of rear spring mount. TIP: empty fuel tank before cutting fuel line!
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                sigpic

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                • #9
                  nov·el·ty
                  noun

                  • 1.
                    the quality of being new, original, or unusual.
                  • 2.
                    a small and inexpensive toy or ornament.

                  Any electric fuel pump is NOT a novelty. Many cars came with them (exclusively) over 50 years ago. My 1965 Sunbeam Tiger for one. They are for some a necessity, for others (priming) a convinience.

                  There is not an argument that a mechanical fuel pump is insufficient (and its function needs to be defended). It has to do with infrequent use, modern gas that evaporates quickly and avoiding excessive cranking on the battery/starter to refill the float bowls. An electric fuel pump is a very practical means of overcoming those problems that is inexpensive and easy to install. Many have stated that they only use it to prime the carburetor and not as a constant method of supplying fuel to the carburetor (though in a mechanical pump failure it is an immediate back up).
                  '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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                  • #10
                    I recently installed an electric pump in my 1980 Ford truck, because it was losing the fuel when it sat for more than a few days, and would not self prime with the mechanical pump. I switch the pump on for about thirty seconds, a few pumps of the throttle and it starts every time. After it runs for a minute or two, I turn off the pump.

                    This truck has no fuel return flow back to the tank, so it is ESSENTIAL that the electric pump be turned off when the engine is shut down. Without a fuel return flow, the pump would run with no fuel flow to cool the electric motor, and it would just get hotter and hotter, a serious fire hazard. Be sure to get the power from a source that turns off when you switch off the ignition, in case you forget to turn off the switch.

                    I have several vehicles with fuel injection, all Japanese, and the fuel pressure is regulated by controlling the fuel flow back to the tank. Any vapor that would form would be pumped back to the tank. Not sure about American cars, but some German cars have no return flow. Perhaps any vapor gets pushed through the injectors - this did not get covered in my physics class.
                    Trying to build a 48 Studebaker for the 21st century.
                    See more of my projects at stilettoman.info

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                    • #11
                      Electric fuel pumps have been used for decades, and it wasn't until relitively recently that the "return" line to the tank was added as a regular thing. It may be required for fuel injection as a way to control fuel volume and pressure very closely. With a single carb on a "street" car you just need a low pressure pump of low to moderate volume. Ideally, the lowest pressure you can get with enough volume to keep the float bowl full under all driving conditions. In the late 70's/early 80's I built several cars with electric pumps with only normal fuel volume requirements, with no return line, and never encountered problems with any of them. On a few (not really street cars) with large fuel requirments and high volume pumps I did use return lines to maintain volume and control pressure. All used carburetors then.
                      sigpic

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                      • #12
                        For priming the carb you will need a momentary switch, such as a button or spring-loaded toggle so the pump isn't running unless you intentionally engage it. In my '51 with A/D the starter switch is mounted under the dash next to the hood release handle. I simply mounted a momentary switch on the same bracket just above and left of the starter switch.
                        "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                        Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                        Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                        '33 Rockne 10,
                        '51 Commander Starlight,
                        '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée",
                        '56 Sky Hawk

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                        • #13
                          Perhaps "accessory" is a more appropriate term to describe an electric fuel pump installation on a Studebaker as no Studebakers had electric fuel pumps installed at the factory. Yes there are many factory built cars with electric fuel pumps however this is a Studebaker forum. There are many forum members who have never experienced a vapor lock and many have. I still feel that that the fuel management issues are mostly caused from compromised cooling systems and inefficient vacuum pumps. The vacuum pumps I have tested will deliver 3-4 times the fuel required. I have installed two sediment bowels (just because I had them) one is an accessory. The car can sit for weeks and the two bowels stay full.Click image for larger version

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by altair View Post
                            Perhaps "accessory" is a more appropriate term to describe an electric fuel pump installation on a Studebaker as no Studebakers had electric fuel pumps installed at the factory. Yes there are many factory built cars with electric fuel pumps however this is a Studebaker forum. There are many forum members who have never experienced a vapor lock and many have. I still feel that that the fuel management issues are mostly caused from compromised cooling systems and inefficient vacuum pumps. The vacuum pumps I have tested will deliver 3-4 times the fuel required. I have installed two sediment bowels (just because I had them) one is an accessory. The car can sit for weeks and the two bowels stay full.[ATTACH=CONFIG]73839[/ATTACH]
                            Quite certain that if you left your car sitting for a few weeks here in the Arizona desert heat your float bowl would be dry due to accelerated evaporation of today's fuels. If you had a sealed fuel system like fuel injection this would not be a problem but since our Studes didn't come that way you might find an electric pump to prime your empty float bowl more of a necessity than an asccessory. Guess it all depends on which type of climate your vehicle is in.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by altair View Post
                              Perhaps "accessory" is a more appropriate term to describe an electric fuel pump installation on a Studebaker as no Studebakers had electric fuel pumps installed at the factory. Yes there are many factory built cars with electric fuel pumps however this is a Studebaker forum. There are many forum members who have never experienced a vapor lock and many have. I still feel that that the fuel management issues are mostly caused from compromised cooling systems and inefficient vacuum pumps. The vacuum pumps I have tested will deliver 3-4 times the fuel required. I have installed two sediment bowels (just because I had them) one is an accessory. The car can sit for weeks and the two bowels stay full.
                              You must get better fuel than we do in California. Here my AFB carb will have an empty float bowl 1 hour after parking it with a hot engine/compartment. As mentioned it might have a bit to do with the weather, the lowest daytime temp we've seen in over a month was 97F; 103 today. I've never had any problem with vapor lock, I just don't like cranking incessantly for starting.

                              In fact the fuel's so bad here, I fill my '96 Harley at the gas station 2 miles from home when comming home. A week later before leaving home it's down 1/4 tank from evaporation. If I buy it and burn it I get 57 mpg, if it sits a week I get 36 mpg.
                              sigpic

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