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Generator

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  • Generator

    Does anyone have a suggestion for a company or person to rebuild a generator for a 1923 Touring Studebaker with a flat six?

  • #2
    I expect any long-established independent auto electrical shop could handle the job for you. Generators haven't changed much in construction for a long, long time. I'm not sure, but your car might have an adjustable third brush to control the charging rate, and instead of a 3-unit regulator, it may have only a cut-out relay. But an old hand at a good shop should know where to look it up. Parts such as brushes and bearings might have to be special-ordered in.

    Otherwise, check the advertisers in Hemmings Motor News.

    By the way, we usually say "flat-head" six, not flat six. The latter term brings to mind Corvairs and Subarus with a horizontally-opposed six that is rather flat in overall profile. Studebaker sixes sit upright, but the cylinder head is "flat" rather than "tall" as in an overhead-valve six. L-head is an equivalent term to flat-head in this instance. The whole point of drawing the distinction is to differentiate between differing valve-train layouts, and has more to do with how the engine functions than its appearance.

    L-head (flat-head): both valves in the block, offset to one side of the cylinder and the crankshaft center line. In British publications, commonly called a side-valve engine.

    T-head: both valves in the block, but on opposing sides of the cylinder.

    OHV (overhead valve): both valves in head, usually in a straight row, operated by push rods from a cam in the block.

    Hemi-head: a type of overhead valve design where the two valves are across from each other with respect to the piston, and when closed, give the top of the combustion chamber a near-hemispherical shape. The valve stems will normally be at about 90 degrees to each other in order to accomodate this. Valves in Chrysler Corp "Hemi" engines were push-rod operated, but the same layout can be easily accomplished by...

    Overhead cam: all valves in head, operated by one or more camshafts also in the head, either directly, via bucket cam followers, or via rocker arms. 2, 3, 4 or more valves, in either hemi, inline, or otherwise are possible.

    F-head: one valve in block, and one above it in the head, operated by a push rod. The ones I know of are overhead intake, and exhaust in the block.

    Then you have your sleeve-valve and rotary-valve engines...

    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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    • #3
      quote:Originally posted by gordr


      Then you have your sleeve-valve and rotary-valve engines...

      ...and the no valve, 2 cycle engines (and rotary engines).


      Dick Steinkamp
      Bellingham, WA

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      • #4
        Great primer, Gord. I knew all that already myself, but found your narrative to be a great refresher course[^]

        Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
        Parish, central NY 13131


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        • #5
          quote:Originally posted by bams50

          Great primer, Gord. I knew all that already myself, but found your narrative to be a great refresher course[^]
          ...Even if it IS WAY off topic!

          Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
          Parish, central NY 13131


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          • #6
            Just had my 47 Champ starter and generator rebuilt here locally(central Arkansas) for $60.

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            • #7
              quote:Originally posted by Jones3090

              Does anyone have a suggestion for a company or person to rebuild a generator for a 1923 Touring Studebaker with a flat six?
              Where are you located? I have an excellent local rebuilder whose been doing a fantastic job here locally since 1945. After 20 years of rebuilds I've never had a problem. If you're interested in their information, feel free to email me. christof@rockymountainstudebaker.net

              Christof Kheim
              ---studesnbldr
              christof@rockymountainstudebaker.net
              Christof Kheim
              ---studesnbldr
              ckheim@yahoo.com

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