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Is there a easy solution for a worn out Ross TA12 steering box?

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  • Steering: Is there a easy solution for a worn out Ross TA12 steering box?

    recently started working on a 1950 2R5 C-cab. Right off the bat found the steering box with significant side to side play on the pitman shaft. Pulled it all out and found the pitman shaft portion of the cam lever has some wear (not super bad in my opinion), but the bearing sleeves are shot. After reading some posts on this site, it seems that a bad Ross box is a near kiss of death for a low cost fix. I'm new at this and not one for figuring out adaptations. I'm thinking of shipping it out to the "Rebuilding Factory" in Oxnard , CA. Anybody have experience or thoughts on this idea? Thanks.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Mort View Post
    recently started working on a 1950 2R5 C-cab. Right off the bat found the steering box with significant side to side play on the pitman shaft. Pulled it all out and found the pitman shaft portion of the cam lever has some wear (not super bad in my opinion), but the bearing sleeves are shot. After reading some posts on this site, it seems that a bad Ross box is a near kiss of death for a low cost fix. I'm new at this and not one for figuring out adaptations. I'm thinking of shipping it out to the "Rebuilding Factory" in Oxnard , CA. Anybody have experience or thoughts on this idea? Thanks.
    Yes do dat. cheers jimmijim
    sigpicAnything worth doing deserves your best shot. Do it right the first time. When you're done you will know it. { I'm just the guy who thinks he knows everything, my buddy is the guy who knows everything.} cheers jimmijim*****SDC***** member

    Comment


    • #3
      Easy solution? Yes! At least, it's worth a try before shipping the box off for a rebuild.

      The two bushings are part number 680210, available from several Studebaker vendors including Studebaker International. As a side note, the bushings used in the earlier T12 box on 2R5 trucks (and on the M5 trucks) is part number 680211. For the 680211 part, this is an industry standard bronze bushing with product code EP141614, 7/8" i.d. x 1" o.d. x 7/8" long. I suspect that the 680210 Studebaker part also matches one of these EP codes, but I don't know what it is. You can measure the bushing i.d., o.d. and length, then ask a good bearing shop for an SAE 841 bronze bushing of that size.

      Press the bushings in with a small hydraulic press. You may need to ream them slightly to get the sector shaft to slide in smoothly.

      If there are flat spots on the pins that engage the worm, grind off the welds on the back side, turn the pins 90 degrees, and re-weld.

      The seal for the sector shaft is 679257, available from Studebaker parts dealers.

      The two cups are part number 197101. There are 22 bearing balls, 5/16" diameter, that can be bought anywhere. Early Jeep CJ's used essentially the same Ross box and suppliers of Jeep restoration and off-road parts have cups, balls, and bushings. Try http://walcks4wd.com. I think this is the kit with cups and balls, but call them and ask about cup o.d. and ball o.d. https://walcks4wd.com/worm-bearing-k...models-ex.html.

      You might also want to install the small TightSteer unit from Walck's that keeps the sector spring-loaded to reduce looseness. Get one that fits the plug in the housing, maybe their model 200X.
      https://www.kaiserwillys.com/media/w...structions.pdf

      Fill the housing with grade 00 semi-fluid grease, available at Tractor Supply as Super S Cotton Picker Spindle grease, $4.99 a quart. It's in the section where they keep all the real tractor parts. https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/pr...ndle-grease-00

      Here's a photo of an M5 truck steering box, similar to the 2R5 box.
      Click image for larger version

Name:	m5_steering_box_parts_ross.jpg
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      Good luck!
      Gary Ash
      Dartmouth, Mass.

      '32 Indy car replica (in progress)
      ’41 Commander Land Cruiser
      '48 M5
      '65 Wagonaire Commander
      '63 Wagonaire Standard
      web site at http://www.studegarage.com

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by garyash View Post
        Easy solution? Yes! At least, it's worth a try before shipping the box off for a rebuild.

        The two bushings are part number 680210, available from several Studebaker vendors including Studebaker International. As a side note, the bushings used in the earlier T12 box on 2R5 trucks (and on the M5 trucks) is part number 680211. For the 680211 part, this is an industry standard bronze bushing with product code EP141614, 7/8" i.d. x 1" o.d. x 7/8" long. I suspect that the 680210 Studebaker part also matches one of these EP codes, but I don't know what it is. You can measure the bushing i.d., o.d. and length, then ask a good bearing shop for an SAE 841 bronze bushing of that size.

        Press the bushings in with a small hydraulic press. You may need to ream them slightly to get the sector shaft to slide in smoothly.

        If there are flat spots on the pins that engage the worm, grind off the welds on the back side, turn the pins 90 degrees, and re-weld.

        The seal for the sector shaft is 679257, available from Studebaker parts dealers.

        The two cups are part number 197101. There are 22 bearing balls, 5/16" diameter, that can be bought anywhere. Early Jeep CJ's used essentially the same Ross box and suppliers of Jeep restoration and off-road parts have cups, balls, and bushings. Try http://walcks4wd.com. I think this is the kit with cups and balls, but call them and ask about cup o.d. and ball o.d. https://walcks4wd.com/worm-bearing-k...models-ex.html.

        You might also want to install the small TightSteer unit from Walck's that keeps the sector spring-loaded to reduce looseness. Get one that fits the plug in the housing, maybe their model 200X.
        https://www.kaiserwillys.com/media/w...structions.pdf

        Fill the housing with grade 00 semi-fluid grease, available at Tractor Supply as Super S Cotton Picker Spindle grease, $4.99 a quart. It's in the section where they keep all the real tractor parts. https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/pr...ndle-grease-00

        Here's a photo of an M5 truck steering box, similar to the 2R5 box.
        [ATTACH=CONFIG]73404[/ATTACH]

        Good luck!
        Doesn't get any better than that. Thanks for posting Gary. cheers jimmijim
        sigpicAnything worth doing deserves your best shot. Do it right the first time. When you're done you will know it. { I'm just the guy who thinks he knows everything, my buddy is the guy who knows everything.} cheers jimmijim*****SDC***** member

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks Gary. I think I can do that, and will start ordering up the parts.

          Comment


          • #6
            Trying to follow Gary's directions I ran into a problem. Seems there are two sizes of bushings for the 1950 2R truck's Ross TA12 box. Stude part number 680210, which is available from several parts vendors measures .876 ID x 1.035 OD. My truck takes part number 680211 which measures .936 ID x 1.064 OD. They are not interchangeable. A sleeve bushing from ASB (American Sleeve Bearing) comes very close to what I need: item CB 1518-12.

            Comment


            • #7
              The ASB part CB 1518-12 is listed as .938" x 1.125" x 1.5". It should be easy enough to turn it down to the size you need. Is the length of your bushing 1.5"? I'll make a note in my parts catalog.
              http://asbbearingsonline.com/index.p...oducts_id=2113

              I'm trying to remember if the bushings were solid bronze or rolled. For 1/16th wall in inch sizes, as you need, they should be available though ASB though the web site doesn't take you to inch sizes, only metric. Maybe a phone call to them can locate exactly what you need.

              See this about pressing in bushings: https://www.engineersedge.com/bearin..._press_fit.htm

              Because the i.d. will shrink when the bushing is pressed in (or drawn in with a big bolt and some washers), you may need to ream the i.d. afterwards.
              Gary Ash
              Dartmouth, Mass.

              '32 Indy car replica (in progress)
              ’41 Commander Land Cruiser
              '48 M5
              '65 Wagonaire Commander
              '63 Wagonaire Standard
              web site at http://www.studegarage.com

              Comment


              • #8
                I have this vague recollection going back thirty years, that there was enough space in the seal bore of the housing to accept two seals. I figured most leak anyway, so two seals might slow the loss. Anyone else remember doing that?

                As to reaming the new bushings, do you have any friends in the automotive machines shops? A Sunnen rod shop has a pin bore hone perfect for that operation and they're accustomed to fitting pins to bushings and working in the .0001" tolerances.

                jack vines
                PackardV8

                Comment


                • #9
                  Gary the original bushing is rolled. I have not checked if ASB has a rolled one of the correct sizs. The original is 1 inch, but I think I can cut it down.

                  Comment

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