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1963 Studebaker 289 Flight-O-Matic transmission cooling...

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    I think James (GrumpyOne) should have said a "Std. 289", instead of "Plain Jane", because he was referring to the ENGINE not a Car without a "R Series" Engine.
    What he said refers more to a Car than an Engine, then he would be Gary L. CORRECT!

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  • studegary
    replied
    Originally posted by GrumpyOne View Post
    Plain Jane 289 have cooling lines in 1963?

    TIA
    If you consider a police package car to be "Plain Jane", then yes, otherwise probably no (taxis usually were not 289s, but possible). These are the most plain jane models that I could think of.

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  • Mark L
    replied
    I was finally able to find a photograph in the shop manual, but it wasn't where I thought it would be. Since my Lark has the 259 V8, I was looking in the Flightomatic section for the 259. I decided to just flip through all the pages in the manual, on the off chance that a photograph for a different topic also captured the baffles. I found it in Group IV, Transmission-Flightomatic used with 170 OHV Engine, Maintenance and Adjustments, page 25, Figure 35. The photograph identifies the location of the transmission oil fill tube. I scanned an image of the figure and identified the 1549243 shield / baffle and the 1549244 shield / baffle.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Lark_Group_IV_flightomatic_for_170 OHV_pg_25_Fig_35_marked.jpg
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  • (S)
    replied
    Picture them scooping up the air and diverting it into the bell housing..

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  • Mark L
    replied
    Thanks. I sorta figured the long one went across the bottom based on the parts book. The one with the longer legs goes on the bottom right, but I wasn't sure about the orientation. I was going to just hold it in place to see which bolt holes line up with the holes in the plate.

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  • (S)
    replied
    I do not have a sample to photo. The skinny one goes across the bottom, the one with the slotted hole goes on the right side, vertically.

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  • Mark L
    replied
    Does anyone have photographs that show the correct installation of the baffles? The baffles were missing from my Lark when I bought it last summer. I bought a set from Mike Gahlbeck a few weeks ago. The parts manual shows them, but it's an exploded view and one of the baffles is not "attached" to the proper location on the bellhousing. I checked all the photographs in the transmission section of the shop manual, but did not see a good photo of the bottom right side.

    Thank you for your help.
    Last edited by Mark L; 02-16-2019, 01:33 PM.

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    The "Best" short tail H.D. is the Truck unit.
    You do have to convert from a Throttle Pressure ROD to a Vacuum Hose and Modulator Valve though, they have LOW Gear Start.

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  • GrumpyOne
    replied
    Thanks all. I will in all probability be looking for a HD Flight-O-Matic with the short tail stock.

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    There is a Large Opening in the Right Side of the Converter Housing that MUST have the Two Baffles attached for Proper AIR Cooling.

    H.D. Flight-O-Matics as used in Trucks, Zip Vans, Police, Taxi, Jet Thrust Avanti Engines, and also Power Shift Transmissions all DO have Oil Line provisions in the Trans., Cooling Lines, and an Oil Cooler in the Radiator bottom Tank.

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  • jimmijim8
    replied
    no lines. cheers jimmijim

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  • 1963 Studebaker 289 Flight-O-Matic transmission cooling...

    Plain Jane 289 have cooling lines in 1963?

    TIA
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