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Fuel

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  • Fuel

    I recently purchased a 1923 Touring Studebaker with a flat six. I am assuming that the motor was designed to burn leaded fuel. Does anyone know if the valves will get too hot if I burn regular unleaded fuel in the car or should I opt to add additives to the fuel to make it leaded fuel?
    Thanks for your suggestions.

  • #2
    Leaded gas was introduced after your car was built,so it should not be a issue.

    JDP/Maryland
    63 R2 SuperHawk (Caesar)
    spent to date $54664,75
    64 R2 GT (Sid)
    spent to date $62,839.60
    63 Lark 2 door
    57 wagon
    51 Commander
    39 Coupe express
    39 Coupe express (rod)

    JDP Maryland

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    • #3
      Is the octane rating too high? Should a top oil be used?

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      • #4
        quote:Originally posted by Son O Lark

        Is the octane rating too high? Should a top oil be used?
        Today's fuels are most certainly higher octane than what was available in 1923. The octane rating of gas is just a measure of its ability to resist pre-ignition, so burning a fuel with an octane rating that is higher than the engine requires causes no harm (though it can be a waste of money).

        More important is the fact that most of today's gas is doped with ethanol, which can cause several problems in old cars. First, ethanol can loosen varnish and other deposits from fuel systems. Perhaps more importantly, it can attack rubber fuel system components, like fuel hoses and the little tip on the needle and seat in the carburetor. It can also remove the shellac on the gas tank float, leading to incorrect gas gauge readings. As a minimum, it might make sense to replace those hoses and install a fuel filter in front of the carb.

        The effect of modern fuels on old cars was discussed in a 5-part series of articles in the March, May, July, October 1999, and February 2000 issues of Turning Wheels. Although they're a little dated, most of the info therein remains current.

        Skip Lackie
        Washington DC
        Skip Lackie

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        • #5
          Skip,

          Would a 1923 have an electric gage, or a King-Seeley barometric sender?
          "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

          Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
          Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
          sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

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          • #6
            quote:Originally posted by rockne10

            Skip,

            Would a 1923 have an electric gage, or a King-Seeley barometric sender?
            Good point. I admit ignorance. I really don't know when Stude adopted the "modern" cork float tank sender, and my parts books don't go back that far. I should've made it clear that my comment was intended as part of a more general caution about the dangers of ethanol in gas.

            Skip Lackie
            Washington DC
            Skip Lackie

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            • #7
              Any suggestion on cork float replacements?

              63VY4 Leakin' Lena

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              • #8
                quote:Originally posted by LarkVIII

                Any suggestion on cork float replacements?

                63VY4 Leakin' Lena
                SI sells replacement senders for many Studes, and JC Whitney sells universal senders. Cork floats can be immunized against ethanol by painting them with POR-15. There was a thread last year about replacing cork floats with a Ford copper float, but I couldn't find it. A little more effort with the search function ought to locate it.

                Skip Lackie
                Washington DC
                Skip Lackie

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                • #9
                  Here are the 2 links on this subject....one talks about
                  what to use to cover the cork with and the other is a
                  detailed thread on how to replace the cork float on the
                  fuel sending unit by Henry Votel of this forum:

                  http://www.studebakerdriversclub.com...ms=cork,floats

                  http://www.studebakerdriversclub.com...ms=cork,floats



                  glen Brose - Perkinsville, AZ

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