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Alternative to staples for attaching cat whiskers??

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  • Interior: Alternative to staples for attaching cat whiskers??

    Ready to install the cat whiskers in my 46 Champion coupe.
    Original attachment to window molding was with staples. I don't have staples, and understand they are a total PITA so don't plan to use them.
    At times I have seen the following recommended as an alternative to the staples:
    Rivets.
    Double sided tape.
    Stainless wire.

    Has any one of those proven to be better than the others, or is it basically personal preference?
    I would appreciate any pros and cons from your experience.
    Thanks!
    Last edited by TXCR13; 08-19-2018, 11:25 AM. Reason: spelling

  • #2
    I would use RTV, aka silicone seal.
    RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

    17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
    10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
    10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
    4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
    5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
    56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
    60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

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    • #3
      I did use stainless rivets; then gave them a good peening to prevent them from scratching the window; also a tiny dab of flat black paint to hide the head.
      "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

      Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
      Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
      '33 Rockne 10,
      '51 Commander Starlight,
      '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée",
      '56 Sky Hawk

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      • #4
        RTV won't hold..I have used ss pop rivets and not had any trouble with window scratching. Could happen when catwhisker gets worn down but there isn't too much chance of that. Emblem tape is wonderful stuff and I have used it too.and so far haven't had anything fall off.

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        • #5
          On my '51 I used the same fasteners that were used for the whiskers on the window trim. I drilled the holes in the door panel, then pushed the fasteners into the holes, then placed the whisker trim onto the fasteners and put small pieces of masking tape to mark their location. I pulled the fasteners back out and crimped them on the whiskers. Now the whiskers can be installed with the fasteners on them. They will come off and can be put back on if you need to.
          Originally posted by TXCR13 View Post
          Ready to install the cat whiskers in my 46 Champion coupe.
          Original attachment to window molding was with staples. I don't have staples, and understand they are a total PITA so don't plan to use them.
          At times I have seen the following recommended as an alternative to the staples:
          Rivets.
          Double sided tape.
          Stainless wire.

          Has any one of those proven to be better than the others, or is it basically personal preference?
          I would appreciate any pros and cons from your experience.
          Thanks!

          Comment


          • #6
            Sorry, it was the other way around. The whisker fasteners that go into holes in the door panel can be used for the window trim.

            Comment


            • #7
              I had been wondering about some type of strong adhesive, but wasn't sure what type to use.
              I think I may do a test with a few very small rivets and see how that works. Maybe a combination of adhesive and a minimal number of rivets.

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              • #8
                I did mine with stainless safety wire Time consuming but its has lasted 30 years , Ed

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                • #9
                  You could drill a small hole and use one of the plastic push in clips used on newer car available at most auto parts stores. Hold good, easy to remove, Will cause no rust or scratch the glass.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Small flat head screws work fine if its in metal. When screwed in the head sinks down into the rubber part of the strips and will not scratch glass.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I also use very small stainless flat head screws
                      Milt

                      1947 Champion (owned since 1967)
                      1961 Hawk 4-speed
                      1967 Avanti
                      1961 Lark 2 door
                      1988 Avanti Convertible

                      Member of SDC since 1973

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks for the additional suggestions about push clips, and small screws. Hadn't thought of those. I do like the fact that either would be easier to remove than rivets.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          One item I forgot about and if I was to replace them again I would look into, Monel staples , They maybe the right width. My Grandfather worked in the Labs of International nickel , The company who developed Monel , Ed

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                          • #14
                            I wanted to update this thread, as I just installed my cat whiskers today. There is more than one effective way to skin a cat, but I wanted to share what I did.
                            I started out trying the clips that crimp on the cat whisker and attach by pushing into fairly big holes drilled in the door frame/vent window frame. I could not get the cat whiskers to fit close enough to the window opening for my liking, and didn't like drilling the bigger holes the clips required.

                            Here is what I used:
                            #4 x 3/8" long pan head stainless sheet metal screws.
                            5/64" drill bit for screw holes.
                            Small needle point punch/awl, about 1/8" diameter for pushing holes in the whiskers.
                            Sharp needle nose punch to center punch for drilling holes in frame.

                            Start out by bending the cat whiskers to fit. I made a pattern out of plywood same as the window opening and shaped the whiskers around them. Making tight corners, the whiskers will tend to roll over, and not stay flat. Take your time, and push firmly all around the outside edge of the whisker when forming corners, don't just pull on the sides/ends. This helps prevent or minimize the whisker separating, especially whiskers with the stainless edging on one side.
                            Once the whiskers were very close to the required shape, tape them into the window opening, and mark the whiskers where you want the screws to be. I put them roughly ever four or five inches in the door frame, plus a couple more close to a couple of difficult to form corners. Note locations of existing holes in the frames before marking the whiskers.
                            The window frame had whiskers which were stapled in. I found that using some of the staple holes worked fine as pilots for drilling screw holes.
                            Remove the whiskers, and place them fuzzy side up on a workbench. Use the smaller punch to push holes in the whiskers. It will usually be necessary to move slightly left or right of the marks to find the soft spot between the metal ribs in the whisker. Push the pick/awl in from the fuzzy side. Making the holes pushes up a bit of the gummy rubber on the back side of the whiskers, but it flattens out when screwed down. Place the holes midway in the width of the whisker, so that when installed the screw head does not catch the edge of the whisker, and prevent it from being fully drawn down.
                            Once all the holes are pushed into the whisker, tape it back into position in the door frame. I started on the passenger side, to learn as I went. Most people look at cars from the driver side, and I wanted my better work there.
                            Place the center punch in one of the holes in the whisker, position the whisker exactly in the frame, and punch the first hole location. Remove whisker, drill hole for screw. It was a challenge to keep the stainless bead at a consistent level on the door frame & vent window frame.
                            Start the screw in the whisker, screw it all the way through, plus a couple turns, BEFORE screwing the whisker to the frame. This may seem like a needless step, but I found it prevents shearing the somewhat soft stainless screws, which did happen some when trying to screw through both whisker and frame at the same time.
                            I attached the corner areas first. This allows better movement/shaping of the whisker in the corners, which are the most troublesome areas. Continue around in the same manner, checking the fit of the whisker to window opening at every screw. You can gently push the whisker out of the way to drill holes as you go.
                            For some of the holes in the frame, I drilled through the preformed holes with the whisker held in place. The drill bit pulled up some fuzz, but surprisingly little, so I think you can drill through the preformed holes in the whisker if needed. I strongly recommend NOT drilling through the whisker without pre-punching the holes for the screws. Without them, the bit wanders all over the place and you will not get holes where you want them.
                            Continue all around, snugging the screws down lightly as you go. Three fingers on the screw driver will do it.
                            If the whiskers aren't flat to the frame in some areas, you can shape it with finger pressure or a plastic pry tool or screwdriver to move it up or down. You also can shape the curves a little by using a small rubber or soft plastic headed hammer. Tap easily and gradually increase the force if needed, but be careful or you will ruin the whisker.
                            Finish up by completely tightening all the screws. It takes a few tries to learn how much force it takes to fully set the screws, but not strip them. I was really pleased to see that the screws go way down in the whisker. I don't think there will be any problem with the screws rubbing against the glass, but if that is a concern, spot a very small dab of black gasket maker on the heads of the screws.
                            Hope this is helpful. Let me know if any questions.
                            Last edited by TXCR13; 08-19-2018, 11:27 AM. Reason: Clarifications and typo corrections.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by TXCR13 View Post
                              I wanted to update this thread, as I just installed my cat whiskers today. There is more than one effective way to skin a cat, but I wanted to share what I did.
                              I started out trying the clips that crimp on the cat whisker and attach by pushing into fairly big holes drilled in the door frame/vent window frame. I could not get the cat whiskers to fit close enough to the window opening for my liking, and didn't like drilling the bigger holes the clips required.

                              Here is what I used:
                              #4 x 3/8" long pan head stainless sheet metal screws.
                              5/64" drill bit for screw holes.
                              Small needle point punch/awl, about 1/8" diameter for pushing holes in the whiskers.
                              Sharp needle nose punch to center punch for drilling holes in frame.

                              Start out by bending the cat whiskers to fit. I made a pattern out of plywood same as the window opening and shaped the whiskers around them. Making tight corners, the whiskers will tend to roll over. Take your time, and push all around the outside edge of the whisker when forming corners, don't just pull on the sides. This helps prevent or minimize the whisker separating, especially whiskers with the stainless edging on one side.
                              Once the whiskers were very close to the required shape, I taped them into the window opening, and marked the whiskers where I wanted the screws to be. I put them roughly ever six inches, plus a couple more close to a couple of difficult to form corners. Note locations of existing holes in the door before marking the whiskers.
                              The window frame had whiskers which were stapled in. I found that using some of the staple holes worked fine as pilots for drilling screw holes.
                              Remove the whiskers, and placed them fuzzy side up on a workbench. Use the smaller punch to push holes in the whiskers, between the metal ribs. It will usually be necessary to move slightly left or right of the marks to find the soft spot between the metal ribs in the whisker. Push the pick/awl in from the fuzzy side. Making the holes pushes up a bit of the gummy rubber on the back side of the whiskers, but it flattens out when screwed down. Place the holes midway of the width of the whisker, so that when installed the screw head does not catch the edge of the whisker, and can be fully drawn down.
                              Once all the holes are pushed into the whisker, tape it back into position in the door frame. I started on the passenger side, to learn as I went. Most people look at cars from the driver side, and I wanted my better work there.
                              Place the center punch in one of the holes in the whisker, position the whisker exactly in the frame, and punch the first hole location. Remove whisker, drill hole for screw.
                              Place the screw in the whisker, screw all the way down, plus a couple turns, BEFORE screwing the whisker to the frame. This may seem like a needless step, but I found it prevents shearing the somewhat soft stainless screws, which can happen when trying to screw through both whisker and frame at the same time.
                              I worked the corner areas first, then went on to the ends. This allows better movement/shaping of the whisker in the corners, which are the most troublesome areas. Continue around in the same manner, checking the fit of the whisker to window opening at every screw. You can gently push the whisker out of the way to drill holes as you go.
                              For some of the holes in the frame, I drilled through the holes with the whisker in place. The drill bit pulled up a some fuzz, but surprisingly little, so I think you can drill through the preformed holes in the whisker if needed. I strongly recommend NOT drill through the whisker without pre-punching the holes for the screws. Without them, the bit wanders all over the place and you will not get holes where you want them.
                              Continue all around, snugging the screws down lightly as you go.
                              If the whiskers aren't flat to the frame in some areas, you can shape it with finger pressure or a plastic tool or screwdriver to move it up or down. You also can shape them a little by using a small rubber or soft plastic headed hammer. Go easy and gradually increase the force if needed, but be careful or you will ruin the whisker.
                              Finish up by completely tightening all the screws, by hand. It takes a time or two to see how much force it takes to fully set the screws, but not strip them. I was really pleased to see that the screws go way down in the whisker. I don't think there will be any problem with the screws rubbing against he glass, but if that is still a concern, then I suggest spotting a very small dab of black gasket maker on the heads of the screws.
                              Hope this is helpful. Let me know if any questions.
                              THAT is a very informative post. This forum needs more posts like that.
                              Jerry Forrester
                              Forrester's Chrome
                              Douglasville, Georgia

                              See all of Buttercup's pictures at https://imgur.com/a/tBjGzTk

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