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Spraying Clear Lacquer Over Base Coat

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  • #16
    Yes, to all, but can I spray lacquer over base coat?...

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    • #17
      Yes you can, and the lacquer may, or may not lift the base coat. The chance you take whenever you mix paint systems. The old school guys will tell you that most any paint can be applied OVER lacquer, but lacquer over other paints is a crap shoot, especially if the paint is fresh.
      Originally posted by 345 DeSoto View Post
      Yes, to all, but can I spray lacquer over base coat?...
      sigpic1966 Daytona (The First One)
      1950 Champion Convertible
      1950 Champion 4Dr
      1955 President 2 Dr Hardtop
      1957 Thunderbird

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      • #18
        Originally posted by 345 DeSoto View Post
        Yes, to all, but can I spray lacquer over base coat?...
        Yes, you CAN spray it, but I wouldn't. You will likely get lifting (assuming a non-lacquer base coat) - probably not right away, but eventually.
        Gary L.
        Wappinger, NY

        SDC member since 1968
        Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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        • #19
          Originally posted by studegary View Post
          Yes, you CAN spray it, but I wouldn't. You will likely get lifting (assuming a non-lacquer base coat) - probably not right away, but eventually.
          I agree. I have had paint lift when spraying over itself possibly covering a fairly new paint job too soon with too much reducer and laying it on to heavy and for other reasons I never did figure out. So just be careful and test a small inconspicuous area.
          don

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          • #20
            Well, I've been "told" that I do it backwards! I paint the exterior first, then the jambs. Why you ask? Because, you will always color sand and polish the exterior, so if you get any overspray on the exterior, it will be gone. Who likes to color sand and polish door jambs? NOBODY! But, anymore, I usually paint thing apart and off the car as much as possible. Just have to take your time and enlist lots of help installing it all "scratch free"

            Jim
            "We can't all be Heroes, Some us just need to stand on the curb and clap as they go by" Will Rogers

            We will provide the curb for you to stand on and clap!


            Indy Honor Flight www.IndyHonorFlight.org

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            • #21
              You have a gun and compressor, correct?

              In my experience, you would be way ahead by just using what you've got. First, rattle can paint has been reduced to spray, so it takes more coats to get film build, using more cans of paint. Second, the Preval sprayer requires the paint to be heavily reduced to pretty much the same as a rattle can, and the Preval sprayer, like a rattle can, has a limited amount of gas pressure, so they don't last very long. Both ways, rattle can or Preval, will take more time and will be more expensive than using your spray gun.

              Just my $.02, based on 40+ years as a furniture maker/finisher.

              John

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              • #22
                That's the old school way that I learned also. When we went to base coat/clear coat, we found that we could jamb color first and clear. When we did the exterior the jambs got a light scotch brite sanding and then re-cleared as the exterior was done eliminating any overspray or cut ins.. Simpy swung the doors, hood and trunk open, if the were attached, for that final coat of clear
                Originally posted by 52 Ragtop View Post
                Well, I've been "told" that I do it backwards! I paint the exterior first, then the jambs. Why you ask? Because, you will always color sand and polish the exterior, so if you get any overspray on the exterior, it will be gone. Who likes to color sand and polish door jambs? NOBODY! But, anymore, I usually paint thing apart and off the car as much as possible. Just have to take your time and enlist lots of help installing it all "scratch free"

                Jim
                sigpic1966 Daytona (The First One)
                1950 Champion Convertible
                1950 Champion 4Dr
                1955 President 2 Dr Hardtop
                1957 Thunderbird

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                • #23
                  I agree with the advice you are getting here. Stay away from lacquer for anything. Some people refer to anything clear as lacquer and that is what I hoped you were doing.

                  As for your jambs, best thing to do is spray them with the same materials you plan for the exterior. I understand your desire to rattle can the jambs now so you don't have to set-up and clean-up the normal paint equipment. If you are going to use rattle can stuff, I would encourage you to use the 2K (2 part) rattle can paints and or clears.

                  Assuming you are planning for a modern urethane BC/CC system for the exterior, another option you may want to consider is modern single stage urethane for the jambs. My local PPG supplier will put their mixed single stage in a rattle can. This would give you good quality products everywhere, but still avoid breaking out the spray guns and filters until you are ready to paint the exterior.
                  Wayne
                  "Trying to shed my CASO ways"

                  sigpic‚Äč

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                  • #24
                    I've decided on single stage 2K epoxy primer, and single stage 2K color, to cut in my jambs/doors. Thanks for all the advice, guys...

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by 345 DeSoto View Post
                      ... If I can quick do the jambs, I can get my interior in and drive the car while I prep/paint the body. Hoping this is doable...
                      This sounds like you want to accomplish this ASAP. But I'm thinking this is winter and seeing you are located in NY - do you want to/can you even - drive around during winter while doing body work? The other question is what caliber of spray can you get from a small plastic nozzle. I know a lot of people don't like Harbor Freight but I recently used their $9.99-$12.99 (depends on the sale) gun to spray 2K primer sealer on the roof of a car. The list price is $15.99 but they always seem to be on sale. https://www.harborfreight.com/20-oz-...gun-47016.html The results were fine. I've only painted a few cars in my life and that was 40+ years ago. Thus I was concern about gun adjustments. But I simply tested it as/is and when it seemed to function well I just ran with it. The HF guns are so inexpensive that it might be considered disposable.

                      They also sell touch up guns that might be beneficial on door jambs. I used the Duplicolor spray can base/clear available at Pep Boys and it seems (at least as they call it) the clear is an acrylic "lacquer." Could it be something similar the company you are considering uses? Here is a link to the product. I had to give it a particular car so it is base on my daily driver but should link to their clear. https://www.pepboys.com/product/deta...01.6L%2520DOHC

                      I've also used the Preval. At least the results I got were a circular spray pattern, runny paint and frankly it just didn't push the paint very far. I found it frustrating.

                      Think this through because doing it over again should not be "an option."
                      '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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                      • #26
                        What's the old proverb? Never time to do it right, but always time to do it over.
                        Originally posted by wittsend View Post
                        This sounds like you want to accomplish this ASAP. But I'm thinking this is winter and seeing you are located in NY - do you want to/can you even - drive around during winter while doing body work? The other question is what caliber of spray can you get from a small plastic nozzle. I know a lot of people don't like Harbor Freight but I recently used their $9.99-$12.99 (depends on the sale) gun to spray 2K primer sealer on the roof of a car. The list price is $15.99 but they always seem to be on sale. https://www.harborfreight.com/20-oz-...gun-47016.html The results were fine. I've only painted a few cars in my life and that was 40+ years ago. Thus I was concern about gun adjustments. But I simply tested it as/is and when it seemed to function well I just ran with it. The HF guns are so inexpensive that it might be considered disposable.

                        They also sell touch up guns that might be beneficial on door jambs. I used the Duplicolor spray can base/clear available at Pep Boys and it seems (at least as they call it) the clear is an acrylic "lacquer." Could it be something similar the company you are considering uses? Here is a link to the product. I had to give it a particular car so it is base on my daily driver but should link to their clear. https://www.pepboys.com/product/deta...01.6L%2520DOHC

                        I've also used the Preval. At least the results I got were a circular spray pattern, runny paint and frankly it just didn't push the paint very far. I found it frustrating.

                        Think this through because doing it over again should not be "an option."
                        sigpic1966 Daytona (The First One)
                        1950 Champion Convertible
                        1950 Champion 4Dr
                        1955 President 2 Dr Hardtop
                        1957 Thunderbird

                        Comment

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