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Power Steering valve adjustment

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  • Steering: Power Steering valve adjustment

    How do you tighten the play in the power steering valve?

  • #2
    Remove the cover ( two 1/4-20 screws) and tighten the nut down until snug, then back it off one flat and road test. May take a couple more 1/6 turns to get o the right spot where the valve works properly but not too loose....

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    • #3
      ........and especially not too tight, or the steering won't return properly when coming out of a turn.
      Paul
      Winston-Salem, NC
      Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

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      • #4
        Originally posted by willyj View Post
        How do you tighten the play in the power steering valve?
        First off, do you know where the free play is at?

        Are you talking about a steering wheel that you can go from 10 to 2 and no tire movement with the engine off?

        The above free play that can be taken up in the steering box side adjustment..

        As far as the valve body, there is not really that much that can be adjusted for "free play".

        The nut being tighten under the cover is for the reaction time between the wheel being turned and the hydraulic pressure being applied to the piston. Too lose and you need effort to turn and then it will jump once the valve is engaged. To tight and the slightest movement of the wheel will cause it to react too quickly.

        Also there is the tie rod end on the end of the power steering arm that if worn will create free play.

        You might be seeing the movement of the ball stud in the valve. This movement is really normal and how the pressure is shuttled between the correct side of the piston.



        This is a typical Bendix ball-stud and shuttle valve. Studebaker's are pressed in the Pittman arm but all other components are the same. The two halves (left and right of the ball-stud) hold the ball-stud and the thick spring keeps pressure against the ball. The cylinder above the ball is the shuttle and it is meant to move back and forth as you turn left or right.


        So can you describe your free play problem a bit more in detail?

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