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289 cu. V8 - A General Review

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  • #31
    Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
    No new engine design required. The architecture of the existing engine would easily accommodate displacements beyond 400". It's a relatively simple foundry process to change the cores which determine head ports and cylinder bore size. It's a relatively simple machining line process to change the boring bars.

    An example would be the actual R3 heads and the almost mythical 340" blocks. At this late date, it's unlikely the internal documentation will ever be discovered, but the discussion of how they came to be would make for interesting reading.

    jack vines
    Jack. It is interesting to look at expanding the Stude V8. I had an R3 at one time that actually had a 5/8 inch stroker kit in it. Yes, not a 1/2 inch but 5/8 inch. I did the math using the "mythical", as you call it, 340 engine and I believe with a .060 overbore it came out to 427 cubic inchs. That was a stretch but as you mention, the architecture was there.
    Last edited by nels; 01-02-2018, 04:09 AM.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Buzzard View Post
      Welcome Jake,
      And don't forget to check out Richard Poe's success with both cubic inches AND no supercharger. His car always amazes me in that he did so much with so little(so to speak) starting inches. I'd like to see pics of his intake manifold as something has been done that is really right for his engine. Just like Jack states about Jim Lange's success at Bonneville. I hope you get the enjoyment out of Studebakers that most of us old farts have, but as time marches on, it will certainly be more difficult to attain due to parts scarcity, knowledge availability etc. Good luck in your travels.
      Bill
      I will say, Richard's 64 sedan is really impressive! Seeing it, hearing it and watching go down the track is really impressive!

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      • #33
        Nels, hopefully a contender for my "bucket list" would be the PSMCD event to see it in person. Here's hoping things come together.
        Cheers, Bill

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        • #34
          Originally posted by nels View Post
          Jack. It is interesting to look at expanding the Stude V8. I had an R3 at one time that actually had a 5/8 inch stroker kit in it. Yes, not a 1/2 inch but 5/8 inch. I did the math using the "mythical", as you call it, 340 engine and I believe with a .060 overbore it came out to 427 cubic inchs. That was a stretch but as you mention, the architecture was there.
          Since there's little-to-no documentation, it's just old-time Studebaker bench racing to postulate what coulda-shoulda-woulda been actually built.

          Your 5/8" stroker would be 4.25" and that, with a 4.00" bore gives 427", certainly possible within the existing architecture. If the prototype 340" blocks used the standard 3.625" stroke, it would require a 3.875" bore. To get to your 427" would be a .125" overbore. Again, just fun, not facts.

          jack vines
          PackardV8

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          • #35
            Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
            Since there's little-to-no documentation, it's just old-time Studebaker bench racing to postulate what coulda-shoulda-woulda been actually built.

            Your 5/8" stroker would be 4.25" and that, with a 4.00" bore gives 427", certainly possible within the existing architecture. If the prototype 340" blocks used the standard 3.625" stroke, it would require a 3.875" bore. To get to your 427" would be a .125" overbore. Again, just fun, not facts.

            jack vines
            If memory serves me right, the lower portion of each cylinder had to be relieved in order to clear the sides of each rod during the crank swing.
            You are right on the 4 inch bore with the stroker....it's been awhile.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Buzzard View Post
              Nels, hopefully a contender for my "bucket list" would be the PSMCD event to see it in person. Here's hoping things come together.
              Cheers, Bill
              Bill, yes, you won't forget the experience. It's actually a great feeling being considered a competitor and a potential threat by the old muscle car guys from years back. It's no longer an embarrassment to get beat by a Studebaker.

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              • #37
                Ron Hall's Bonneville engine uses 2 bolt caps. The caps are machined flat and a ground HT 1045 bar spans the top of the 3 center mains. We used ARP main studs. We were going to be running above 7000 RPM at full load for about 7 miles (he shifted from 3rd to 4th @ almost 7600 RPM). We did not want the main caps deflecting. The picture also shows the external oil relief.
                Attached Files
                james r pepper

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by jpepper View Post
                  Ron Hall's Bonneville engine uses 2 bolt caps. The caps are machined flat and a ground HT 1045 bar spans the top of the 3 center mains. We used ARP main studs. We were going to be running above 7000 RPM at full load for about 7 miles (he shifted from 3rd to 4th @ almost 7600 RPM). We did not want the main caps deflecting. The picture also shows the external oil relief.
                  Thanks, Jim. That move makes good sense.

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                  • #39
                    I'm still digging that old SAE report reprint from Hot Rod. The past is a different country part #4872081201. (Declaimer: I missed out of the '50s because I wasn't born yet.) I wonder how many times they have to reduce the V8 cross section on the PMT camera to get that little "bug" on top of some of those pages? I'm digging the ads for forgotten speed shops and hop-up equipment. I'm really digging this cartoon, with the contrast between a traditional matronly mother and baby carriage against the new generation. Kudos to the cartoonist doing the washes. They aren't too harshly dark like a lot of '50s magazine cartoons. And hot diggity dog! A teenage tomboy in a t-shirt and peddle pushers! <3

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                    1963 Champ "Stu Bludebaker"- sometimes driver
                    1957 Silver Hawk "Josie"- picking up the pieces after an unreliable body man let it rot for 11 years from an almost driver to a basket case
                    1951 Land Cruiser "Bunnie Ketcher" only 47M miles!
                    1951 Commander Starlight "Dale"- basket case
                    1947 Champion "Sally"- basket case
                    1941 Commander Land Cruiser "Ursula"- basket case

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