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What year did Studebaker switch to 12V

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Dwight FitzSimons View Post
    And, if my reading comprehension skills are correct, the answer is NOT 1956. In post #2 Bob Palma states that Dick Quinn has stated that the answer is NOT 1956. I would sooner doubt my wife's knowledge in her specialties (medical technology and art) than either Bob or Dick. I have to confess that I do not know the answer to the question either but will keep this issue in the back of my mind until it is answered.
    -Dwight
    It really has been answered. See post #4: the two questions were different. Studebaker, along with a number of other makes, switched its electrical systems to 12 volts, negative ground, with its 1956 models, introduced in late 1955. However, as noted by several posters, including me, there were some Studebaker models that had 12v or even 24 volt systems before that.
    Skip Lackie

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Skip Lackie View Post
      It really has been answered. See post #4: the two questions were different. Studebaker, along with a number of other makes, switched its electrical systems to 12 volts, negative ground, with its 1956 models, introduced in late 1955. However, as noted by several posters, including me, there were some Studebaker models that had 12v or even 24 volt systems before that.
      That's an excellent summary, Skip; when Studebaker switched to something and when they first used something are two different questions with two different answers. The OP asked when Studebaker first used 12-volt electrics.

      An easily-understood comparison is this: Studebaker switched to non-Studebaker engines beginning with the 1965 model year, but they first used engines not of their own manufacture years earlier, especially in WWII trucks. BP
      We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

      Ayn Rand:
      "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

      G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
        That's an excellent summary, Skip; when Studebaker switched to something and when they first used something are two different questions with two different answers. The OP asked when Studebaker first used 12-volt electrics.

        An easily-understood comparison is this: Studebaker switched to non-Studebaker engines beginning with the 1965 model year, but they first used engines not of their own manufacture years earlier, especially in WWII trucks. BP
        Actually the OP asked both questions! The title asked when they switched, the body of the post asked when they were first used.
        Chip
        '63 Cruiser
        '57 Packard wagon
        '61 Lark Regal 4 dr wagon
        '50 Commander 4 dr sedan

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        • #34
          Originally posted by raoul5788 View Post
          Actually the OP asked both questions! The title asked when they switched, the body of the post asked when they were first used.
          Right-O, Chip; 'good catch. BP
          We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

          Ayn Rand:
          "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

          G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

          Comment

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