Announcement

Collapse

Get more Tips, Specs and Technical Data!

Did you know... this Forum is a service of the Studebaker Drivers Club? For more technical tips, specifications, history and tech data, visit the Tech Tips page at the SDC Homepage: www.studebakerdriversclub.com/tips.asp
See more
See less

Adding an oil filter after the fact

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Skip Lackie
    replied
    Originally posted by 6hk71400 View Post
    I do see the picture but my new question is will the OHV 6 work for my V8?

    Thanks for all the responses.

    Bob Miles
    Tucson AZ
    Bob-
    The same can/holder (post #18) was used on both 6 and V8. It just mounts somewhat differently. The factory units came with steel tubing, but the accessory units sold by dealers often came with flexible hoses. Given their age, those hoses are probably no good any more anyway. You could use copper tubing and bend it yourself -- or you might be able to find a used kit that is complete with the tubing. Tom Karkiewicz might have one.

    Leave a comment:


  • az64stude
    replied
    Just the filter base you will need the V8 pipes and mounting bracket. Or you could get one of these.Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC08932.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	83.8 KB
ID:	1717659

    Leave a comment:


  • 6hk71400
    replied
    I do see the picture but my new question is will the OHV 6 work for my V8?

    Thanks for all the responses.

    Bob Miles
    Tucson AZ

    Leave a comment:


  • StudeRich
    replied
    Originally posted by sobranterob View Post
    I have a 61 Lark,OHV 6 it has no oil filter, and I can't see where it would have been mounted, nor do I see a place for any fittings.
    I think the restriction value was very close to and almost behind the starter.
    Can someone tell me the location of the in and out hose lines.
    No, most if not all OHV Sixes have TWO 1/8 Pipe threaded Holes near the center of the Block, Left side, over and under. The Lower one is an easy access Return and the upper is the Pressure Port.

    The Restrictor Hole is in the Spin-On Filter Base Casting, so that it can not be run without it.

    I have connected my Frantz, Tissue Paper Filters there, and it was an easy install.

    My '63 takes 7 Qts. because it has the Full Flow AND a Frantz, with adding a full Qt. at every 1-2000 Mile Filter Change, the Oil could Last 2 to 5 Years or more due to the addition of fresh Oil and additives that do "wear out".

    The Mfg. Sky Corp. recommended NEVER changing the Oil due to their "Particulate Matter" Testing, Oil with Many Miles and Years on it. I play it safe, and change it at 1 or 2 Years.

    Leave a comment:


  • az64stude
    replied
    Bob this has one for OHV its at a place near you
    Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC08773.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	100.4 KB
ID:	1717650

    Leave a comment:


  • Hallabutt
    replied
    I have a Franz on my 1955 Commander htp. It seems to do what it was designed for. I have a top mounted bypass on my 1960 wagon. I find it a great deal less messy then any of the filters that have to be removed from underneath. While the top mounted filters drain back much of their contents, some remains in the filter by design. After waiting ten minutes, a few drops are all that you will see. I don't know about anybody else, but besides being a pain crawling under the car to change a filter mounted underneath the engine, the full filter, invariably, falls into my pan of hot oil. Not very enjoyable!

    Leave a comment:


  • thunderations
    replied
    I have a Frantz, (toilet paper) filter in my shed. Had it on an AMC and it worked great. Need to use the cheapest TP you can get, gas station quality. No Charmin or any of that soft fluffy stuff the blue bears use. The premium paper dissolves and clogs the system. The cheap stuff holds together and filters well. After several thousand miles, simply unclamp the housing, replace the TP and add a quart of fresh oil. I've never had oil any cleaner then that thing kept it.
    Originally posted by wittsend View Post
    This assumes two things. One, that all the oil is actually filtered. But with the "feed off of" aspect the possibility exists that some may not. Second, particles may be being put into the engine oil by combustion or draft tube style crank case ventilation and are introduced at a rate higher than the filter is capturing. Thus the times (X) cleaner aspect needs to consider that. Not trying to be argumentative, just considering additional factors. I'd think there is a reason manufacturers went to a full flow system regardless of the math suggesting a bypass filter should be good enough.

    That said even most full filter arrangements have a bypass valve because dirty oil is better than no oil at all. I have a friend who ruined two full flow Datsun engines removing the "in block" bypass valve simply because that is what they did on the BRE race engines. And even changing oil every 2,500 miles something inhibited the oil flow.

    Anyone remember the Frantz add on (bypass style) oil filters that took a toilet paper roll?

    Leave a comment:


  • wittsend
    replied
    Originally posted by garyash View Post
    No, I don't think it takes forever for a bypass filter to clean up the oil. It's not easy to find specs on the flow of the old oil pumps, but it is in the range of 5-10 quarts per minute when you are driving. With only 1-2 quarts per minute flowing through the filter, the oil will be 100 times cleaner in 20 minutes of driving and maybe 1,000,000 times cleaner after an hour. Since the filter is working every time you turn the engine on, it does keep the oil clean. In 20 minutes of driving, you have a 99% chance of catching any big, nasty particles, hopefully before they do any damage. ...
    This assumes two things. One, that all the oil is actually filtered. But with the "feed off of" aspect the possibility exists that some may not. Second, particles may be being put into the engine oil by combustion or draft tube style crank case ventilation and are introduced at a rate higher than the filter is capturing. Thus the times (X) cleaner aspect needs to consider that. Not trying to be argumentative, just considering additional factors. I'd think there is a reason manufacturers went to a full flow system regardless of the math suggesting a bypass filter should be good enough.

    That said even most full filter arrangements have a bypass valve because dirty oil is better than no oil at all. I have a friend who ruined two full flow Datsun engines removing the "in block" bypass valve simply because that is what they did on the BRE race engines. And even changing oil every 2,500 miles something inhibited the oil flow.

    Anyone remember the Frantz add on (bypass style) oil filters that took a toilet paper roll?

    Leave a comment:


  • sobranterob
    replied
    I have a 61 Lark,OHV 6 it has no oil filter, and I can't see where it would have been mounted, nor do I see a place for any fittings.
    I think the restriction value was very close to and almost behind the starter.
    Can someone tell me the location of the in and out hose lines.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ross
    replied
    Did some experimenting years ago with a Packard partial flow and got results about what Gary suggests: all of the oil is filtered every few minutes. That is actually quite OK unless your engine is throwing chunks that need to be caught right away. The idea after all, is to get all of the fines out of the oil so it doesn't turn into pressure fed lapping compound. With detergent oil that is designed to keep fines in suspension some sort of filter is a good idea.

    No worries at all about messy filter changes with the cartridge type partial flow: They drain down fairly quickly. Go have a cup of coffee while the drain plug is out of the engine. By the time you come back the filter will be empty and spin off with hardly any mess at all. In contrast the full flow filters always make a mess as I manuever them around the pipes.

    Leave a comment:


  • garyash
    replied
    No, I don't think it takes forever for a bypass filter to clean up the oil. It's not easy to find specs on the flow of the old oil pumps, but it is in the range of 5-10 quarts per minute when you are driving. With only 1-2 quarts per minute flowing through the filter, the oil will be 100 times cleaner in 20 minutes of driving and maybe 1,000,000 times cleaner after an hour. Since the filter is working every time you turn the engine on, it does keep the oil clean. In 20 minutes of driving, you have a 99% chance of catching any big, nasty particles, hopefully before they do any damage.

    In the old days, before detergent oils, the big particles became part of the sludge that settled to the bottom of the crankcase and (mostly) drained out when the oil was changed every few thousand miles. Full-flow filters let us drive much longer distances before changing the oil, and detergent oils keep the particles suspended in the oil so that the filter gets most of them above a certain size. What a bypass filter doesn't do is pick up a particle as soon as you turn the engine on - but then, you have to ask why the filter didn't pick up the particle the last time the engine was running. Any filter is much, much better than no filter, and a bypass filter is really pretty good.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	orifice_flow.jpg
Views:	4
Size:	28.3 KB
ID:	1717531Click image for larger version

Name:	oil_clean_ratio.jpg
Views:	3
Size:	34.2 KB
ID:	1717532

    Leave a comment:


  • TWChamp
    replied
    If you are priming the carb to get the dry engine started, be sure to use something like an empty mustard bottle with a small squeeze opening. In the 70's I saw a guy who worked at another car dealership, and his face was badly burned by using an open can of gas to start an engine. Four years ago my neighbor burned his motorhome to the ground doing the same thing. I like to pour gas down the carb bowl vent tube, then stand back and crank. Repeat as needed until the fuel pump is filling the carb.

    Leave a comment:


  • bezhawk
    replied
    From 58-62 you would not have a canister oil-filter. It should be a spin on type taking a Fram PB-50 filter.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike Van Veghten
    replied
    I'll look to see if I still have my stuff. If I can find it, you can have it or the shipping cost. Will look this weekend.
    With the "partial filter" setup, it takes for EVER (many, many continual miles) to filter the 5 qt's of oil.
    I took mine off just after buying my Lark. I've put almost 100,000 miles on it, still running well, no funny noises..! I just change the oil at 3000/3500 miles.

    Mike

    Leave a comment:


  • 64studeavanti
    replied
    I have some extra partial flow filter set ups
    Both canister and spin on. PM me if interested.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X