Announcement

Collapse

Get more Tips, Specs and Technical Data!

Did you know... this Forum is a service of the Studebaker Drivers Club? For more technical tips, specifications, history and tech data, visit the Tech Tips page at the SDC Homepage: www.studebakerdriversclub.com/tips.asp
See more
See less

Adding an oil filter after the fact

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Engine: Adding an oil filter after the fact

    My newest car, 1962 Lark, has an old bath air cleaner for the 2 barrel carb but the by pass oil filter is not there. This is an early 62 based on the body number, serial number (has the older Studebaker Packard plate). I looked on the right side of the engine but did not see a full flow filter. I am sending off for a production order just to get the history. I think it was sold new in Tucson by Ed Cometz and has been several places until it is back in Tucson.

    When I got the car, tried the key to start but no go. Using two hands and arms, I was able to open the hood. Reason the car would not start was the battery was gone. Bought a new battery and hold down, cranked her up and with gas down the carb fired up. Tank is bone dry and will add 5 gals to check and see if the fuel pump will pump.

    1. What parts do I need to set up the by pass that sits on top of the engine? This is not my first choice as they are messy when you change the filter.

    2. Is there any way to put the flow full filter on this car?

    3 Other options?

    4. Anyone have the parts for 1-4 or where I could find them.

    Thanks as always

    Robert Miles
    Tucson AZ

  • #2
    The 61 and 62 OHV cars I have owned all had the spin on bypass filters or the full flow which they added during the 62 model year. Kits are still out there to add a spin on to your engine. They had numbers like AC3064, 8, 9 etc They are basically hoses or pipes and fittings with a bracket. One of the fittings needs to have a restriction in it
    Milt

    1947 Champion (owned since 1967)
    1961 Hawk 4-speed
    1967 Avanti
    1961 Lark 2 door
    1988 Avanti Convertible

    Member of SDC since 1973

    Comment


    • #3
      What Milt said in Post #2.

      For all practical purposes, you cannot add a full-flow oil filter to a block that was not cast for one, such as your early '62. Malcolm Berry went to a lot of trouble to do it, but it's not to be undertaken by anyone with less technical knowledge or ability than him, and few people have his skill level.

      In other words, don't think about trying to add a full-flow filter. BP
      We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

      Ayn Rand:
      "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

      G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

      Comment


      • #4
        The hoses and restrictor are available from Studebaker vendors, but you may need to keep an eye open for the canister and bracket. They do show up on Ebay, and occasionally in the trunk of junk cars.

        It sounds like this car may have been sitting for a bit. I would do a thorough brake restoration before attempting to get it moving. Better no go than no whoa.
        "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

        Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
        Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
        sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

        Comment


        • #5
          I have some extra partial flow filter set ups
          Both canister and spin on. PM me if interested.
          78 Avanti RQB 2792
          64 Avanti R1 R5408
          63 Avanti R1 R4551
          63 Avanti R1 R2281
          62 GT Hawk V15949
          56 GH 6032504
          56 GH 6032588
          55 Speedster 7160047
          55 Speedster 7165279

          Comment


          • #6
            I'll look to see if I still have my stuff. If I can find it, you can have it or the shipping cost. Will look this weekend.
            With the "partial filter" setup, it takes for EVER (many, many continual miles) to filter the 5 qt's of oil.
            I took mine off just after buying my Lark. I've put almost 100,000 miles on it, still running well, no funny noises..! I just change the oil at 3000/3500 miles.

            Mike

            Comment


            • #7
              From 58-62 you would not have a canister oil-filter. It should be a spin on type taking a Fram PB-50 filter.
              Bez Auto Alchemy
              573-318-8948
              http://bezautoalchemy.com


              "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

              Comment


              • #8
                If you are priming the carb to get the dry engine started, be sure to use something like an empty mustard bottle with a small squeeze opening. In the 70's I saw a guy who worked at another car dealership, and his face was badly burned by using an open can of gas to start an engine. Four years ago my neighbor burned his motorhome to the ground doing the same thing. I like to pour gas down the carb bowl vent tube, then stand back and crank. Repeat as needed until the fuel pump is filling the carb.

                Comment


                • #9
                  No, I don't think it takes forever for a bypass filter to clean up the oil. It's not easy to find specs on the flow of the old oil pumps, but it is in the range of 5-10 quarts per minute when you are driving. With only 1-2 quarts per minute flowing through the filter, the oil will be 100 times cleaner in 20 minutes of driving and maybe 1,000,000 times cleaner after an hour. Since the filter is working every time you turn the engine on, it does keep the oil clean. In 20 minutes of driving, you have a 99% chance of catching any big, nasty particles, hopefully before they do any damage.

                  In the old days, before detergent oils, the big particles became part of the sludge that settled to the bottom of the crankcase and (mostly) drained out when the oil was changed every few thousand miles. Full-flow filters let us drive much longer distances before changing the oil, and detergent oils keep the particles suspended in the oil so that the filter gets most of them above a certain size. What a bypass filter doesn't do is pick up a particle as soon as you turn the engine on - but then, you have to ask why the filter didn't pick up the particle the last time the engine was running. Any filter is much, much better than no filter, and a bypass filter is really pretty good.

                  Click image for larger version

Name:	orifice_flow.jpg
Views:	4
Size:	28.3 KB
ID:	1717531Click image for larger version

Name:	oil_clean_ratio.jpg
Views:	3
Size:	34.2 KB
ID:	1717532
                  Gary Ash
                  Dartmouth, Mass.

                  '32 Indy car replica (in progress)
                  ’41 Commander Land Cruiser
                  '48 M5
                  '65 Wagonaire Commander
                  '63 Wagonaire Standard
                  web site at http://www.studegarage.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Did some experimenting years ago with a Packard partial flow and got results about what Gary suggests: all of the oil is filtered every few minutes. That is actually quite OK unless your engine is throwing chunks that need to be caught right away. The idea after all, is to get all of the fines out of the oil so it doesn't turn into pressure fed lapping compound. With detergent oil that is designed to keep fines in suspension some sort of filter is a good idea.

                    No worries at all about messy filter changes with the cartridge type partial flow: They drain down fairly quickly. Go have a cup of coffee while the drain plug is out of the engine. By the time you come back the filter will be empty and spin off with hardly any mess at all. In contrast the full flow filters always make a mess as I manuever them around the pipes.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have a 61 Lark,OHV 6 it has no oil filter, and I can't see where it would have been mounted, nor do I see a place for any fittings.
                      I think the restriction value was very close to and almost behind the starter.
                      Can someone tell me the location of the in and out hose lines.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by garyash View Post
                        No, I don't think it takes forever for a bypass filter to clean up the oil. It's not easy to find specs on the flow of the old oil pumps, but it is in the range of 5-10 quarts per minute when you are driving. With only 1-2 quarts per minute flowing through the filter, the oil will be 100 times cleaner in 20 minutes of driving and maybe 1,000,000 times cleaner after an hour. Since the filter is working every time you turn the engine on, it does keep the oil clean. In 20 minutes of driving, you have a 99% chance of catching any big, nasty particles, hopefully before they do any damage. ...
                        This assumes two things. One, that all the oil is actually filtered. But with the "feed off of" aspect the possibility exists that some may not. Second, particles may be being put into the engine oil by combustion or draft tube style crank case ventilation and are introduced at a rate higher than the filter is capturing. Thus the times (X) cleaner aspect needs to consider that. Not trying to be argumentative, just considering additional factors. I'd think there is a reason manufacturers went to a full flow system regardless of the math suggesting a bypass filter should be good enough.

                        That said even most full filter arrangements have a bypass valve because dirty oil is better than no oil at all. I have a friend who ruined two full flow Datsun engines removing the "in block" bypass valve simply because that is what they did on the BRE race engines. And even changing oil every 2,500 miles something inhibited the oil flow.

                        Anyone remember the Frantz add on (bypass style) oil filters that took a toilet paper roll?
                        '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I have a Frantz, (toilet paper) filter in my shed. Had it on an AMC and it worked great. Need to use the cheapest TP you can get, gas station quality. No Charmin or any of that soft fluffy stuff the blue bears use. The premium paper dissolves and clogs the system. The cheap stuff holds together and filters well. After several thousand miles, simply unclamp the housing, replace the TP and add a quart of fresh oil. I've never had oil any cleaner then that thing kept it.
                          Originally posted by wittsend View Post
                          This assumes two things. One, that all the oil is actually filtered. But with the "feed off of" aspect the possibility exists that some may not. Second, particles may be being put into the engine oil by combustion or draft tube style crank case ventilation and are introduced at a rate higher than the filter is capturing. Thus the times (X) cleaner aspect needs to consider that. Not trying to be argumentative, just considering additional factors. I'd think there is a reason manufacturers went to a full flow system regardless of the math suggesting a bypass filter should be good enough.

                          That said even most full filter arrangements have a bypass valve because dirty oil is better than no oil at all. I have a friend who ruined two full flow Datsun engines removing the "in block" bypass valve simply because that is what they did on the BRE race engines. And even changing oil every 2,500 miles something inhibited the oil flow.

                          Anyone remember the Frantz add on (bypass style) oil filters that took a toilet paper roll?
                          sigpic1966 Daytona (The First One)
                          1950 Champion Convertible
                          1950 Champion 4Dr
                          1955 President 2 Dr Hardtop
                          1957 Thunderbird

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I have a Franz on my 1955 Commander htp. It seems to do what it was designed for. I have a top mounted bypass on my 1960 wagon. I find it a great deal less messy then any of the filters that have to be removed from underneath. While the top mounted filters drain back much of their contents, some remains in the filter by design. After waiting ten minutes, a few drops are all that you will see. I don't know about anybody else, but besides being a pain crawling under the car to change a filter mounted underneath the engine, the full filter, invariably, falls into my pan of hot oil. Not very enjoyable!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Bob this has one for OHV its at a place near you
                              Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC08773.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	100.4 KB
ID:	1717650

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X