Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

CASO

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Engine: CASO

    OK, I'm all set to reveal my ignorance. Caso is first person singular of casar. What the heck does that have to do with anything automotive? It is some kind of "clever" neologism but darned if I can figure it out from context! WTF are you talking about?

  • #2
    Cheap A$$ed Studebaker Owner, CASO, many in the Studebaker community are tight with their money and will not pay premium prices for parts.

    Comment


    • #3
      CASO...an acronym for the ages...To many of us, the initials may have appeared relatively recently, I believe the "spirit" of it, as related to Studebaker owners, goes back decades. Perhaps in the "well heeled" society of the early twentieth century, Studebaker buyers/owners, were a frugal pragmatic "buck for value" group of folks. However, especially "post WWII" era, when I came into "auto awareness," here in the "hard scrabble" south, most Studebakers I ever saw were worn out beater used cars. Beat up, banged up, exhaust smoking, rattle traps with sketchy brakes. Odd looking contraptions that appeared to linger wishfully near scrap yards in search of a much needed resting place.

      It probably has "regional" implications, but here, even the well off folks, who dared to be "different," and buy New Studebaker...were subject to ridicule. So much so, that even as a child, I pretty much kept secret my admiration for the cars from my rather large family. I recall adult church members (the center of our social circle), teasing our music director for buying a brand new President Coupe in 1955. That included my own father, who wouldn't be able to afford any new car, of any brand, for almost a decade later.

      Therefore..."CASO" in my opinion, has implications that extend beyond our lighthearted attempt of comic relief. It can be defensive, offensive, or a casual "term of endearment." I prefer the latter.
      John Clary
      Greer, SC

      SDC member since 1975

      Comment


      • #4
        I was totally unaware that it even possible to buy cheap Studebaker parts! Thanks for enlightening this CASO!

        Comment


        • #5
          Funny...

          See my post - http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...hat-don-t-know

          Mike

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Jeffry Cassel View Post
            I was totally unaware that it even possible to buy cheap Studebaker parts! Thanks for enlightening this CASO!
            I can almost never find Studebaker parts at most swap meets, but once you're in the Studebaker family and attend the Studebaker sponsored swap meets, I can usually find many needed parts at good prices. I always felt Studebaker people like to help each other keep the cars on the road and are often pretty fair with the prices.

            Comment


            • #7
              The term CASO is generally used by sellers when potential buyers complain about prices. These sellers were probably CASO when they purchased their inventories. It's all a matter of perspective. A lot of us have been on both sides.
              American iron, real old school
              With two tone paint, it sure is cool

              Its got 8 cylinders and uses them all
              With an overdrive that just won't stall

              With a 4 barrel carb and dual exhausts
              With 4.23 gears it can really get lost

              Its got safety belts and I ain't scared
              The brakes are good and the tires are fair.

              Tried to sell her, but got no taker
              I"ll just keep driving my Studebaker

              Comment


              • #8
                As mentioned, many of us got into the hobby when Studebakers were just the cheapest of used cars and parts cars were thick on the ground. Many never considered rebuilding an engine because the car/truck wasn't worth the cost; just get a $50 running engine from the nearest rusted-out Stude. Then, when exchanges became more difficult to find, just throw rings, bearings, a valve grind in 'er and she'll run another 25,000 - Stude engines don't require that high dollar machining and rebuilding. Yeah, OK, your car, your money, your decision, but there has been a change over the past decade. At the International Meets, the quality of Studebaker cars and trucks and the investment therein has increased exponentially. CASO may die out with us old guys.

                jack vines
                PackardV8

                Comment


                • #9
                  Jack. Problem is so will our Studebaker's not a whole lot of young guy's that want them. There are a few but few and far between.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by swvalcon View Post
                    Jack. Problem is so will our Studebaker's not a whole lot of young guy's that want them. There are a few but few and far between.
                    For true, and it's not just our Studes; but cars always sell. Watch a televised auction and see hundreds of gorgeous street rods/customs and restored cars get hammered for one-third of what they cost to build.

                    jack vines
                    PackardV8

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by swvalcon View Post
                      Jack. Problem is so will our Studebaker's not a whole lot of young guy's that want them. There are a few but few and far between.
                      Just get a modern celebrity (and I don't mean Aunt Bee) to drive around in a Studebaker, have one appear in a popular music video or film and Studebaker will again grab the interest of the youth. It will however be short lived (could be a matter of minutes, hours or days - if weeks it is a total success).

                      Who knows the Studebaker might even take on a "Ricer" status although I guess being American the owners would be called Wheaters." Can you imaging a 19 year old Wheater showing up at a Studebaker meeting with a lowered Lark, 20" wheels (40 series tires), a "body kit" and a fart can exhaust that will make the typical 80 year old Studebaker owner thinking their Beltone hearing aid has gone bad.
                      '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by TWChamp View Post
                        I can almost never find Studebaker parts at most swap meets, but once you're in the Studebaker family and attend the Studebaker sponsored swap meets, I can usually find many needed parts at good prices. I always felt Studebaker people like to help each other keep the cars on the road and are often pretty fair with the prices.
                        I don't agree with a lot of what TWChamps says. I like to modify my cars and drive fast and I like my cars to be able to surpass the expressway speed limits.
                        But, this time I totally agree with him.
                        Jerry Forrester
                        Forrester's Chrome
                        Douglasville, Georgia

                        See all of Buttercup's pictures at https://imgur.com/a/tBjGzTk

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Cash aware studebaker owner.
                          Allan Tyler Melbourne Australia

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
                            As mentioned, many of us got into the hobby when Studebakers were just the cheapest of used cars and parts cars were thick on the ground. Many never considered rebuilding an engine because the car/truck wasn't worth the cost; just get a $50 running engine from the nearest rusted-out Stude. Then, when exchanges became more difficult to find, just throw rings, bearings, a valve grind in 'er and she'll run another 25,000 - Stude engines don't require that high dollar machining and rebuilding. Yeah, OK, your car, your money, your decision, but there has been a change over the past decade. At the International Meets, the quality of Studebaker cars and trucks and the investment therein has increased exponentially. CASO may die out with us old guys.

                            jack vines
                            I agree with what Jack says; I am one of those old guys who could buy a cheap running Stude back in the day because there was not a high demand for them. Sometimes it's hard to let go........

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I'm a Studebaker Owner. New to Stude hobby. Cheap Ass...we'll always been that.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X