Announcement

Collapse

Get more Tips, Specs and Technical Data!

Did you know... this Forum is a service of the Studebaker Drivers Club? For more technical tips, specifications, history and tech data, visit the Tech Tips page at the SDC Homepage: www.studebakerdriversclub.com/tips.asp
See more
See less

How to take out transmission

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Transmission: How to take out transmission

    So, i have a 61 Lark OHV l6 that has a toast clutch. Ive disconnected everything from the trans, OD cables, driveline, half the bell housing bolts, shifter linkage, etc. Does the engine need to be supported to take the trans out? It doesnt look like theres anything in the back holding it up other than the tranny crossmember. I have a jack with a large towel between the 2 right now just in case.

    Also after pulling the driveline i got a bunch of watery oil coming out the back, so the rear seal is toast in the trans, should it possibly be fine or should i start looking for a possible replacement? As far as i know its all original, block to the rear.

    Finally, does anyone happen to have all the necessary stuff to replace the clutch assembly, clutch disc, throwout bearing, etc, that you'd be willing to part with for $300 or less? Im 19 and im new to this car. The parts are harder to find but i love Studebakers so thats why im keeping it.

    Thanks guys,
    Ryan

  • #2
    Congrats on the the 61 6 with overdrive, that is a fun combo to drive.

    It is easier to remove the trans separate from the bell housing. Just the 4 large bolts and pull it straight out since you have removed the other stuff already.

    Then you will have to have a way to hold up the back of the engine as the rear motor mounts are on the bell housing. A jack, a block of wood and a wadded up towel placed under the back edge of the oil pan will do the trick. Note that there are special bolts with shoulders at about the 3 and 9 o'clock positions that align the bell to the engine. These must go back in the same place.

    All of the parts you mention should be obtainable for your budget. I just saw a clutch disk , NOS for your car on ebay 2 days ago for $50. Throwout and pilot are available from Rockauto for chump change, and one of the Stude vendors is bound to have a pressure plate if yours is scored up.

    Napa will have the rear seal. Be careful digging the old one out as there is a bushing right behind it that supports your front u-joint.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by StarDiero75 View Post
      So, i have a 61 Lark OHV l6 that has a toast clutch. Ive disconnected everything from the trans, OD cables, driveline, half the bell housing bolts, shifter linkage, etc. Does the engine need to be supported to take the trans out? It doesnt look like theres anything in the back holding it up other than the tranny crossmember. I have a jack with a large towel between the 2 right now just in case.

      Also after pulling the driveline i got a bunch of watery oil coming out the back, so the rear seal is toast in the trans, should it possibly be fine or should i start looking for a possible replacement? As far as i know its all original, block to the rear.

      Finally, does anyone happen to have all the necessary stuff to replace the clutch assembly, clutch disc, throwout bearing, etc, that you'd be willing to part with for $300 or less? Im 19 and im new to this car. The parts are harder to find but i love Studebakers so thats why im keeping it.
      Thanks guys,
      Ryan
      Ryan, great to have you participating on the forum! I find it hard to believe I have made it to be 73 years old. Believe it or not, I recall being 19. Fresh out of high school, earning $1.10 per hour, paying rent to my parents, and making car & insurance payments. I recall sitting in the break room with co-workers, watching them eat snacks from the vending machines, while I pretended to not be hungry, but really didn't have money for chips & a drink. I understand what it's like to have (ahem) "Limited Economic Resources."

      A wonderful thing about youth, is the ability to apply the spirit of optimism, energy, and discovery available in abundance, to those willing to learn. In addition to you mentioning your age, I highlighted your statement regarding "parts being hard to find" as noted above. It caused me to think you may not be "ALL IN," regarding the Studebaker family. Knowing money is an issue for you, I urge you to find a way to become truly connected, by joining the SDC, subscribing to Turning Wheels, and familiarizing yourself with Studebaker parts vendors (surprising how much is available). Also, you need copies of the factory manuals...Shop, Body, and Chassis. They are available on CD's. In the meantime, if money is too tight to buy them outright, check out your library, there may be a section where you can check out books in the automobile technical section that cover's vintage cars. At least, if not your specific car, enough to give you some good instruction for mechanical basics. For example, removing a transmission from your Studebaker will not be all that different from a similar equipped (manual transmission) Ford, Chevy, or Plymouth of that vintage.

      Getting the correct information (manuals) is as important as any wrench you will use in your toolbox. Doing it "safely," is even more important. As best I can, I'm trying to offer encouragement. Take your time, avoid shortcuts, and work a deliberate plan.

      My wish for you is that when your reach my age...You too will look back, with a smile, and say..."If I had known I would feel this good at this age...I would have saved more money and lived calmer!"
      John Clary
      Greer, SC

      SDC member since 1975

      Comment


      • #4
        Ryan, you don't say where you are in Washington, but one of our esteemed Studebaker vendors is right there in Lynden, WA. And he posts here as Studerich.
        Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

        Comment


        • #5
          Im in bremerton, west of seattle.
          Thats real neat to have him here. Ill actually be making a roadtrip with my friend to canada this summer so ill have to stop and talk to him.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thats a neat story you got there haha.
            I do have the studebaker shop manual for 61-64 cars, its huge and yellow.

            You're partially right about not being ALL IN. See, i have a 65 Ranchero that is my first car/daily that i try to keep going. I bought the Stude because I've wanted one since i was 13 and it was for $400 so it was kind of an impulse buy. But i do truely want to keep it and see it going. I was able to price out new brakes for the car and getting new bearings and stuff which isnt too bad. Im just not used to going to vendors yet. Im used to popping into NAPA or O'Reillys or using RockAuto. I did go to Steven Allens and got an air cleaner adapter b/c someone put a Rochester Model B on it, so i bought a Carter AS and got the adapter for the original air cleaner.

            All ive done to the car now since i bought it in may was replace the fuel pump, replace spark plugs, bought (not installed) water pump, cleaned and painted the fan pulley and fan. Im finally about to get a battery for it so i can set the valves so i can see where TDC is. I did find a power brake booster out of a 66 Cruiser that i wanted to put on the Lark, but i pulled it from the Auto Wreckers so im expecting it not to work yet. Also, on top of needing clutch stuff, it drives me nuts that i dont have the tail lights for this car. Its got 1 and its beaten to crap. Everytime i find one on ebay, they go for $100+, so if you happen to know someone with 2 good tailights and housings for the 61, thatd be awesome.

            Thanks,
            Ryan

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Ross View Post
              Congrats on the the 61 6 with overdrive, that is a fun combo to drive.

              It is easier to remove the trans separate from the bell housing. Just the 4 large bolts and pull it straight out since you have removed the other stuff already.

              Then you will have to have a way to hold up the back of the engine as the rear motor mounts are on the bell housing. A jack, a block of wood and a wadded up towel placed under the back edge of the oil pan will do the trick. Note that there are special bolts with shoulders at about the 3 and 9 o'clock positions that align the bell to the engine. These must go back in the same place.

              All of the parts you mention should be obtainable for your budget. I just saw a clutch disk , NOS for your car on ebay 2 days ago for $50. Throwout and pilot are available from Rockauto for chump change, and one of the Stude vendors is bound to have a pressure plate if yours is scored up.

              Napa will have the rear seal. Be careful digging the old one out as there is a bushing right behind it that supports your front u-joint.
              Ok, thats good i didnt try pulling all that at once then. Ill try pulling just the trans, and ill watch those bolts.
              I just hit up ebay and theres a 9.25x1.125 for $135+ship. But ill keep looking. I did notice that rockauto had the other stuff pretty cheap which aint worrying me. If my pressure plate isnt scored, do i just take it to a machine shop or does someone rebuild it? I havent gotten that far on my 65 Ranchero so i dont know what the pressure plate looks like.
              Thats good, ill hit up NAPA here soon after college lets out for christmas.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Ross View Post
                Congrats on the the 61 6 with overdrive, that is a fun combo to drive.

                It is easier to remove the trans separate from the bell housing. Just the 4 large bolts and pull it straight out since you have removed the other stuff already.

                Then you will have to have a way to hold up the back of the engine as the rear motor mounts are on the bell housing. A jack, a block of wood and a wadded up towel placed under the back edge of the oil pan will do the trick. Note that there are special bolts with shoulders at about the 3 and 9 o'clock positions that align the bell to the engine. These must go back in the same place.

                All of the parts you mention should be obtainable for your budget. I just saw a clutch disk , NOS for your car on ebay 2 days ago for $50. Throwout and pilot are available from Rockauto for chump change, and one of the Stude vendors is bound to have a pressure plate if yours is scored up.

                Napa will have the rear seal. Be careful digging the old one out as there is a bushing right behind it that supports your front u-joint.
                Also, should i get a clutch disk that has 4 springs in it or 6?

                Comment


                • #9
                  You get the 8 1/2 inch one that belongs in a 170 OHV 6 Cyl. NOT a smaller or Larger 6 or a V8 one, probably has 4 springs on the Disc.

                  Most of these "on-line listings" have no idea what the differences are between a "6" and an "8" or a 1950 vs a 1964.
                  StudeRich
                  Second Generation Stude Driver,
                  Proud '54 Starliner Owner

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
                    You get the 8 1/2 inch one that belongs in a 170 OHV 6 Cyl. NOT a smaller or Larger 6 or a V8 one, probably has 4 springs on the Disc.

                    Most of these "on-line listings" have no idea what the differences are between a "6" and an "8" or a 1950 vs a 1964.
                    So theres a difference in the 50 an 61 8.5" disk for the l6?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      My SI catalog shows the same 800368 disc fitting from 1939 to 1964. Listed as 8 1/2" x 1" spline.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Total guess here, but on average a V 8 used between 1800- 2100 pound pressure plate. Through all the years, they changed them depending on usage. The amount of springs really does not matter as long as the pressure is correct.. However, the amount of springs does affect how the clutch releases. A V 8 clutch has nothing to do with the one you have, but the theory is the same.

                        You want as many springs possible for an 'even' release. If they have one with 4, avoid it, as long as the one with more has the right 'pounds' . If they have one with 4 springs rated at 1100 pounds, but the other one with 6 springs is also 1100 pounds- get the one with 6 springs......

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I would recommend getting 2 bolts that are the same size as the bolts that bolt your transmission to the bell housing, but are 6” or so long and cut the heads off. Then, when you’re ready to reinstall the transmission, just screw those 2 bolts into opposite corners of the bell housing. Now, the transmission can be supported by those 2 bolts while you slide it in, and it’s basically aligned so it goes in much easier. Then, install 2 of the bolts that hold the transmission to the bell housing and once they’re secure, remove the two 6” studs and put in the other 2 retaining bolts. Easy!!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by ColoradoHawk View Post
                            I would recommend getting 2 bolts that are the same size as the bolts that bolt your transmission to the bell housing, but are 6” or so long and cut the heads off. Then, when you’re ready to reinstall the transmission, just screw those 2 bolts into opposite corners of the bell housing. Now, the transmission can be supported by those 2 bolts while you slide it in, and it’s basically aligned so it goes in much easier. Then, install 2 of the bolts that hold the transmission to the bell housing and once they’re secure, remove the two 6” studs and put in the other 2 retaining bolts. Easy!!
                            That aint a bad idea. Thanks man. I will be doiing that

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by (S) View Post
                              Total guess here, but on average a V 8 used between 1800- 2100 pound pressure plate. Through all the years, they changed them depending on usage. The amount of springs really does not matter as long as the pressure is correct.. However, the amount of springs does affect how the clutch releases. A V 8 clutch has nothing to do with the one you have, but the theory is the same.

                              You want as many springs possible for an 'even' release. If they have one with 4, avoid it, as long as the one with more has the right 'pounds' . If they have one with 4 springs rated at 1100 pounds, but the other one with 6 springs is also 1100 pounds- get the one with 6 springs......
                              When searching for a clutch disk for this car, i dont think ive ever seen the pressure atuff you're talking about. I will make sure to pay attention though

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X