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Seat belt installation in a 5H-K5

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  • Seat belt installation in a 5H-K5

    Kindest regards,

    Alan Mende
    Grantville, PA

    I'm not a mechanic; I don't even play one on TV.

  • #2
    The torque boxes on my 55 Speedster are from CE but I had the same problem. I cut a small (1 x 3 in) access hole in the bottom of the torque box and then fabricated a patch to cover the hole.


    34 STUDEBAKER STREET ROD
    55 SPEEDSTER (in work)
    63 R2 LARK (in work)
    85 AVANTI (9K miles)

    34 Studebaker Street Rod (completed)
    55 Speedster (in work)
    63 Lark R2 (completed, 63K miles)
    64 Daytona CNV (completed, 63K miles)
    64 Avanti R2 (completed)
    85 Avanti(blackout trim, 10K miles)
    89 Avanti CNV (19K miles)

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    • #3
      cut a hole in the bottom of the torque box with a hole saw, and use a rubber plug to fill the hole if it really bothers you.

      nate

      --
      55 Commander Starlight
      http://members.cox.net/njnagel
      --
      55 Commander Starlight
      http://members.cox.net/njnagel

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      • #4
        quote:Originally posted by alanmende
        it doesn�t seem right to just drill through the floor and torque boxes and just use real long bolts with large washers.
        I used long bolts and drilled through both the floor and the torque box. They don't have to be REAL long bolts. You'll have to use special, large seat belt washers no matter which way you do it. What doesn't seem right about that method? Seems to me it gives the same results and would be easier.






        Dick Steinkamp
        Bellingham, WA

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        • #5
          Hi Dick,

          Seems that just drilling holes in both the floor and torque box and then tightening the fastener will pull the two together.

          Alan
          Kindest regards,

          Alan Mende
          Grantville, PA

          I'm not a mechanic; I don't even play one on TV.

          Comment


          • #6
            On my '54 K body I did it the same way Dick did. Used longer bolts on the outer side. The two layers are strong enough that they won't pull together. ("Your results may vary" ) As Dick said, be sure to use large seat belt type washers under the bolts and nuts.

            Dave Bonn
            Valencia PA
            '54 Champion Starliner

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            • #7
              quote:Originally posted by alanmende

              Hi Dick,

              Seems that just drilling holes in both the floor and torque box and then tightening the fastener will pull the two together.
              It didn't for me, but I don't recall really cranking on the fasteners. I used a ny-lock nut on the bolt. My floors and torque boxes were super solid Central California originals. If either the floors or torque boxes are a little "thin" it might be more of an issue. You might want to try my method, then if you aren't happy with how it works, you can always do Nate's.

              BTW, I always use seat belts, but my guess is that in a "real" accident, they are somewhat useless in these old cars with no crumple zones, no collapsible steering columns, air bags, side impact beams, etc.




              Dick Steinkamp
              Bellingham, WA

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              • #8
                Yeah, but they'll keep me in the car so I can be impaled by the steering column.

                Alan

                PS: This, too, was a California car. We bought it from Chester Bradfield who got it from the late Darrel Dye.

                PPS (or is it PSS?): Thanks to everyone for your responses. I think I'll go with Dick's recommendation, and if I don't feel comfortable with it, I already have a pilot hole in the torque box for using a hole saw to try Nate's method.
                Kindest regards,

                Alan Mende
                Grantville, PA

                I'm not a mechanic; I don't even play one on TV.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I did the same as Dick and Dave- drilled through both. The torque box sheet metal is pretty strong. Maybe I didn't pull mine tight either, but I don't remember any sign of crushing (of course 40 years dims one's memory. I put the inner bolts on the driveshaft tunnel at the top of the foot wells.



                  [img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia
                  '53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
                  '64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
                  '64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
                  Museum R-4 engine
                  1962 Gravely Model L (Studebaker-Packard serial plate)
                  1972 Gravely Model 430 (Studebaker name plate, Studebaker Onan engine)
                  Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
                  '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

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                  • #10
                    My torque boxes on my '53 are non-stock. Think I used 14 gauge galvanized. Since I did not want to put a really large hole in them and worried about crushing, I only drilled a hole just big enough for the socket wrench w/extension through the torque box. Then I fished the big backing washer for the belt's eyebolt through a gap/slit between the floor pan and sidewall of the box. Used a pc of wire with a hook from the inside of the car through the bolt hole. Yes it was a pain [}] The big washer and eyebolt are then tightened up against the floor and not the bottom of the box. Feels really solid. I think another approach would be to cut a section of electrical conduit and then push that in from the bottom so it hits the underside of the floor and then put the big washer and nut on the bottom of the box. It won't crush thay way either or pull through if the washer is large enough and conduit is bigger than the hole in the floor pan. The eyebolts that came with my belt kit were too short to try this latter ideal though.

                    BTW, what works best for big hole in sheet metal like this is a step drill rather than a large regular one. It won't snag in the thin metal when it breaks through and bend up the hole or get stuck.



                    Jeff in ND

                    '53 Champion Hardtop

                    Jeff in ND

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