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  • Rear Axle: Twin Traction?

    When running my 57 silver hawk on the jack stands I found that the right rear axle shaft was bent.
    So I went to my favorite salvage yard and got a rear axle from a 58 silver hawk.
    After bringing it home as I started I to open the cover I noticed a tag still on the bolt and cleaned it up to find it is the ratio tag (3.31 ratio)
    That was good but then I found another tag with a big T on it, that made me think "could this be a twin traction?".
    It turned out that it is a twin traction when I pulled the cover.
    Is there any DIS-advantages in running this axle in my hawk over the non TT?
    If i run this, do I need special lube or just regular 90W?
    I would guess no special lube needed since there is no clutch plates in the exploded view I found online.
    Did I get a steal at $125?... I think so.

    Any opinion will help.....
    19
    TT
    94.74%
    18
    Regular rear axle
    5.26%
    1

    The poll is expired.


  • #2
    Either TT or conventional rear ends will work just fine for 99.9 percent of us. I prefer TT because it provides better traction in moving forward in slippery conditions, but cannot recall the last time I actually needed it. I'd say you did great, at $125. For fluid, standard gear oil, with positrac additive is all I use. I prefer 85W140, available at FLAPS, and grab tube of additive while there. Without the additive, the clutches will grip too hard, and the rear end will pop as the clutches forcibly slip, mostly on turns. Hard to believe a simple tube of additive will address the issue, but that is all that is needed.

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    • #3
      Your car...run what you like..!

      Most of today's good oils will work properly with any clutch type positraction.
      If you have concern, spend a little more and use a synthetic and you'll be fine.

      Mike

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      • #4
        I personally like the synthetic lubes over the conventional ones as I believe it offers better protection over a wider range of temperature. I've been using Amsoil Severe Gear 75W-110 in my 62 Hawk and 63 Avanti. It has the LS additive already added to it so no other is necessary. Amsoil and Redline products are more expensive than some of the other lubes, but how often does the lube in a differential get replaced? Spend the money and get the best lubes available as they are cheaper than replacing expensive parts. Bud

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        • #5
          If you plan to drive on icy roads be mindful that when you slip your rear tires on acceleration or potentially even on deceleration if it is pure ice, the rear end will go sideways whenever you break traction.
          Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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          • #6
            I have no intention of driving this car in any snow or salty roads as long as I own it.

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            • #7
              with the Studebaker TT you will see no issue driving in ice or snow. the limited slip rear end regardless of design will be transparent to your driving. A LOCKER type differential can cause issues on ice and snow, or when traction is suddenly achieved. However that is a different animal all together. TT is great for everyday driving and spirited takeoffs. Its not worth upgrading an open rear just to have TT. If you scored the TT at a great price and its the correct ratio I say its a WIN WIN to install it. Yes you need the additive. Eaton doesn't even recommend synthetic oil in their new units, however I know many folks who run the synthetic without issue.
              Russ
              Originally posted by Galactica5 View Post
              I have no intention of driving this car in any snow or salty roads as long as I own it.
              Last edited by rusty nut garage; 11-05-2017, 06:33 AM. Reason: spelling

              Russ Shop Foreman \"Rusty Nut Garage\"
              53 2R6 289 5SpdOD (driver)
              57 SH (project)
              60 Lark VIII 2dr sd (driver)

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              • #8
                Originally posted by rusty nut garage View Post
                with the Studebaker TT you will see no issue driving in ice or snow. the limited slip rear end regardless of design will be transparent to your driving. A LOCKER type differential can cause issues on ice and snow, or when traction is suddenly achieved. However that is a different animal all together. TT is great for everyday driving and spirited takeoffs. Its not worth upgrading an open rear just to have TT. If you scored the TT at a great price and its the correct ratio I say its a WIN WIN to install it. Yes you need the additive. Eaton doesn't even recommend synthetic oil in their new units, however I know many folks who run the synthetic without issue.
                Russ
                My experience exactly.

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                • #9
                  I had a Locking Diff BMW put me on a curb while turning on ice.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Galactica5 View Post
                    I have no intention of driving this car in any snow or salty roads as long as I own it.
                    Not surprising.
                    Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Mrs K Corbin View Post
                      I had a Locking Diff BMW put me on a curb while turning on ice.
                      I have a winter car with a posi.
                      It requires a bit of training and experience to drive one of these.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Galactica5 View Post
                        I have a winter car with a posi.
                        It requires a bit of training and experience to drive one of these.
                        Soo what additional skill set does the posi/TT require?

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                        • #13
                          See post 5. Although I have no experience with a Studebaker I have had numerous limited slips on other vehicles.
                          Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JoeHall View Post
                            Soo what additional skill set does the posi/TT require?
                            It takes a lighter foot on the pedal in slippery conditions or you will spin out for one thing.

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                            • #15
                              Back in 1959 Dana Corp published a paper in the SAE transactions about limited slip differentials. Mostly their power lok, which was the same type as Studebaker TT. Many pages about different designs, how to bias the torque delivery etc. Back then "peer review" comments were recorded and attached at the ends of SAE papers. Attached are the comments from the GM dude, who comments on the driveability quirks of their Positraction LSD, including loss of lateral stability in slippery conditions. The Studebaker Packard dude goes on for about a page, mostly about the difficulties they had finding lubrication that would not chatter AND lubricate the gears properly.
                              Attached Files
                              Last edited by Dan Timberlake; 11-10-2017, 04:52 PM.

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