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  • Fuel System: Fuel Hose

    After receiving part number 1557450 hose, flex, to trans cooler for an Avanti from a major Studebaker vendor, I'm doing more research on what the hoses are made for. The rubber hoses were marked for fuel/ vapor. I was replacing the hoses because the old ones are well over 50 years old. An article in Underhood Service in the August 2015 issue explains the codes: SAE 30R6 this hose is designed for low pressure applications such as carburetors or emissions hose, not designed for over 10 or 12 psi., or for 100 to 250 degree transmission fluid, the same for SAE 30 R7. Next we have SAE 30R9, designed for high pressure applications like fuel injection and oil, it is formulated for under hood heat. The next type is SAE 30 R10 this is designed for intank on the fuel pump module, however it is not to used under hood as it doesn't withstand the under hood heat. So now you see the problem who ever made the hose assemblies for the major vendor used the wrong hose and no one has noticed, but if one of these hoses bursts hot ATF on hot exhaust manifolds a fire will be the most likely result. Now no one wants their Avanti to melt down so major vendor you need to recall and replace ALL substandard hoses. Lou Cote

  • #2
    Lou, what about 30R14T1. sold as fuel hose, marked Barrier Hose.Is it alky resistant? thanks Doofus

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    • #3
      So, which one were the hoses made of?
      78 Avanti RQB 2792
      64 Avanti R1 R5408
      63 Avanti R1 R4551
      63 Avanti R1 R2281
      62 GT Hawk V15949
      56 GH 6032504
      56 GH 6032588
      55 Speedster 7160047
      55 Speedster 7165279

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      • #4
        The hoses were made of SAE 30 R6, for carburated low pressure no heat. SAE J 30 R14T1 is the standard for ultra-low permeation properties. This type of hose is typically approved for use with leaded and unleaded gasoline,diesel, bio-diesel,E 85, ethanol , methanol,and gasohol fuels. These are typically used for low pressure applications. Lou Cote

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        • #5
          This is serious business! What we need to discuss, and need to educate ourselves, is the various applications and how to identify the "WHAT, WHERE, & WHEN," for choosing the correct hose going forward! (Not only here, but a Turning Wheels Cooperator Column too!) Not just for our vintage, mostly stock applications, but since so many of our vehicles (not mine...yet) have been customized with modern power plants/transmissions, it is certainly pertinent to get ourselves "up to speed" on the topic.

          Just last week, I went to move my retired 1987 Nissan truck to mow the grass. As I moved it forward, I smelled fresh raw gas. I bought this truck new and have had so little trouble with it that I still have to look to find the safety catch for the hood to raise it. Once raised, I discovered gasoline spewing from the rubber fuel hose just before the substantial metal filter canister that Nissan used in these vehicles. I noticed that the hose was disintegrating from the inside out (ethanol?), and that it looked to have a more substantial braiding than traditional fuel hose. I really don't know the difference in fuel injection pressures between direct fuel injection and throttle body injection.This is a throttle body injection system. But when I bought new hose, I took a sample with me and specified hose for "fuel injection."I only replaced the leaking hose, but I need to go back and replace the remaining sections of hose, including the one on the filter outlet, and the return line too.

          In the initial post on this thread, there was mention of a "MAJOR VENDOR?" Are we discussing hose from one of our major SDC VENDORS?...or national parts CHAIN/FRANCHISE vendors? I was told by my local parts counter clerk, that if I hadn't specified "fuel injector hose," I would have gotten regular low pressure hose because they know I'm usually working on my vintage vehicles. If it is our own vendors, such as SI, Turner Brake, Fairborn, etc., we need to get assurance and clarification.
          John Clary
          Greer, SC

          SDC member since 1975

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          • #6
            Thanks lou, found the Gates fuel hose site finally. next up will br a roll of 3/8 Barrier hose for the hot rods. Luck Doofus

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            • #7
              The major vendor was not a flaps or NAPA period, not Turner nor Fairborn. Like I said they need to own up to wrong materials being used on these hoses. I have over 32 years in the transmission repair industry, I have seen the results of using fuel hose in that application. Lou Cote

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              • #8
                Wrong stuff guys...

                According to...Gates, it's - "Barricade", not Barrier.
                http://www.gates.com/products/automo...ction-hose-mpi

                The Barrier is for the air conditioning system. The Barricade is for the fuel system..!

                I still like the (in a previously mentioned thread) Teflon protected by steel braided stainless steel wire as a near fool proof, life long system.

                Mike

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                • #9
                  VERY IMPORTANT! A few yrs ago spring came to MN (it happens) and I went into the shed to take my daughters 66 Mustang out to wash it and service it. It would not start; it just sputtered, and then I smelled gas. When I opened the hood I found the alcohol safe fuel hose had rotted away and gas had sprayed all over the engine. Thank God for good plug wires! That#**%# gasohol could have destroyed the shed, several Studebakers as well as the Mustang and maybe me. Get the very best fuel line and check it often.

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                  • #10
                    You are right Mike, it's Barricade hose i bought. new hearing aids so cant see as well as ustacud LOL . Doofus

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Jeffry Cassel View Post
                      VERY IMPORTANT! A few yrs ago spring came to MN (it happens) and I went into the shed to take my daughters 66 Mustang out to wash it and service it. It would not start; it just sputtered, and then I smelled gas. When I opened the hood I found the alcohol safe fuel hose had rotted away and gas had sprayed all over the engine. Thank God for good plug wires! That#**%# gasohol could have destroyed the shed, several Studebakers as well as the Mustang and maybe me. Get the very best fuel line and check it often.
                      Yep, ever since that new crap gas was forced upon us, have you notice the great increase in burn marks on the side of the road? Back in the 80's I mentioned to a few people that suddenly there seemed to be a lot more burn marks on the shoulders from car that went up in flames. It wasn't until I learned about all the bad things crap gas does, that I made the connection. My Omni caught on fire just as I was walking into the house after work. It was just lucky I happened to turn around and saw a puff of smoke coming out of the hood. I was able to get the fire out and only had to replace a few hoses and wires. Some years ago in Minnesota some children burned to death after the van went up in flames. Ethanol has been a very costly mistake.

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                      • #12
                        Sometimes posts are made on this Forum because of a “believed” problem without going to the source of the part first. The SAE R7 hose we are using in all four of the transmission cooler hoses we sell are rated at -40 degrees F to 257 degrees F. Their maximum pressure is 50 psi. These fall well within the requirements of these hoses. Additionally, I pulled the original Studebaker prints for these hoses, 198888, 535284, 1557450 and 1559180 and all four listed an SAE R4 as the flexible hose used by Studebaker when the cars were new. You’ll note that this is a significantly lower number than the SAE R7 we are using.

                        Ed Reynolds
                        StudebakerInternational

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                        • #13
                          So why would you not use p/s hose for trans cooler ? The hose they sell here in California that's supposed to be for fuel starts rotting after about 6 months, so I have found that the one they call fuel injection hose is the only one that is dependable. I had a 71 bronco engine catch on fire because of the crap for hose they sell here.

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