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Firestone Widowmaker Wheel photos Part 1

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  • rockne10
    replied
    To simplify the search for thread "Part 2", here's the link. http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...-photos-Part-2

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  • LeoH
    replied
    Another thing about lock ring rims I just learned a few weeks ago. There are split ring, like Craig's, 2 piece lock ring rims, but also 1 piece lock ring rims. The salesman at American Wheel Specialists in Washington pointed out to me, about the 1 piece lock ring rims that, you have to carefully pull the ring onto the rim or you end up destroying the tension and ruining that wheel. There is a set of 5 of those rims on eBay, but they only have photos of the wheels and rings together so you can't see what the condition of the rings are at the rim. Probably they are okay, but not worth a gamble for that much money to me to check, plus they were only selling 5 so you still need to hunt down a mate at some point.

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  • LeoH
    replied
    Very nice wheels Craig. I have to point out though that you have later model split ring 6 lug rims. Mine are the 5 lug. When I went to a local truck tire shop, they had no problem with mounting a set of split ring rims, they said they'd do those type for $15 a wheel, the Firestones they wouldn't touch. 2 other commercial tire shops I asked also refused to mount the original rims. After watching the process, I can't fault them.

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  • Skip Lackie
    replied
    Originally posted by tsenecal View Post
    I had a set of these on a 1950 Ford F2. I turned it into a Rat Rod due to severe rust issues, but wanted to keep the 17"wheels with their original patina. I talked to the tire shop here, and was told that they were obligated to destroy any of that style rims that came in. I cleaned them up, and mounted them myself with new tubes, flaps and tires. On each one, I would lock them together, then apply 10 pounds of air to seat the lock, and mount it on the truck to finish inflation. That way if the wheel came apart the inside section would blow up against the frame, and the outer section would be securely bolted to the hub. This all worked fine for me, and have been on for a couple of years now.
    Agree. But on trucks with dualies, if the outer rear wheel comes apart, the outer section blows outward.

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  • 8E45E
    replied
    My truck also has the same Firestone split-rims: http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...on-my-64-Toter

    The local tire shop chain's 'industrial & heavy truck division' mounted mine after sandblasting and powder coating.



    Craig

    Leave a comment:


  • tsenecal
    replied
    I had a set of these on a 1950 Ford F2. I turned it into a Rat Rod due to severe rust issues, but wanted to keep the 17"wheels with their original patina. I talked to the tire shop here, and was told that they were obligated to destroy any of that style rims that came in. I cleaned them up, and mounted them myself with new tubes, flaps and tires. On each one, I would lock them together, then apply 10 pounds of air to seat the lock, and mount it on the truck to finish inflation. That way if the wheel came apart the inside section would blow up against the frame, and the outer section would be securely bolted to the hub. This all worked fine for me, and have been on for a couple of years now.

    Leave a comment:


  • Skip Lackie
    replied
    Leo has done a fair amount of research and correctly concluded his Firestone RH5deg wheels are widow-makers. The subject comes up regularly on the Stude Truck Talk site, where we are fortunate to be able to rely on a gentleman who uses the handle Truckdog. He has many years of experience in the truck tire industry, and also still has all the old truck wheel books. The same wheels and bolt patterns were used by a number of other truck manufacturers, so he can sometimes recommend alternatives. The issue can be very confusing because many other, safer designs use similar terminology.

    Many of Stude's big trucks came with the RH5deg wheels beginning with the 2R models and continued for at least a decade. My 4E40 has them. I was lucky to find an old-time truck tire shop that still had the cage and the experience to mount my tires. However, if I had known about their dangerous nature before I invested in new tires, I would have spent the money to convert to another wheel design. Fortunately, most of the danger occurs during mounting, and not on the road.

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    I have heard that this type is just a two piece (Split Rim) Truck Wheel, not really a "Widowmaker".
    Apparently the "Real Windowmakers"really were dangerous, but a completely different design.

    Doe anyone have MORE experience with that Older type? What is the big difference?
    Our local Less Schwab Tire Store had no trouble R & R'ing Tires on the type shown here fairly recently.

    Leave a comment:


  • LeoH
    replied
    Um, there are 2 separate posts, 1 and 2....
    Last edited by LeoH; 10-21-2017, 08:16 PM.

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  • Tom Bredehoft
    replied
    Two copies, Part 1.

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  • LeoH
    started a topic Wheels / Tires: Firestone Widowmaker Wheel photos Part 1

    Firestone Widowmaker Wheel photos Part 1

    Because of the interest of a long time SDC'er in seeing these photos more widely shown, I am posting pics and comments about a set of wheels 2 of our local SDC club helped another member in mounting the 2 piece Firestone RH-5 rims. This is not a how-to set of instructions, but it is a rare set of pics showing the steps in how these rims are mounted. Because I helped, I didn't shoot video, but took many pictures and wrote what happened along the way and some points we learned in the process. Your limbs may vary, I am aware of the hazards of what we took on and if one of our members hadn't done this himself, I can see how things might have been overlooked along the way. It was an interesting process.
    I am attempting to get the photos to be widely viewed on the FB Studebaker Addicts group, but in the meantime, I'll take a stab at it here. More text and instruction will be available on those photos when I get them up.
    The tools we used were a long tire iron (2 if you have them), sledge and wood block, large pipe clamps, heavy chain and hooks, and wheel grease. (A good deodorant and/or shower will be advised as well) There were 3 of us around 160# to 200#.
    SO, set out your rims and lock rings in pairs. One thing we learned, that I don't recall in any of the threads about these rims is, there are 2 sizes of rings and rims. One set of rims is wider than the other and has a corresponding smaller lock ring so that the rims end up being the same size. 6" or 6.5". Ralph noticed the height difference in the rims when they were painted which led us to notice the different widths stamped on the locking rings. Gary is applying a layer of grease to the inner lip of the rims where they meet the locking rings (also greased). Set the tube in place with the tire liner and be sure to tuck in the tube, minimize any creases or folds in the tube and the liner around the tire. Place the rim on the ground and set the tire/tube down into the rim slot with the valve stem opening. Try to get the valve stem centered in that opening best as you can, but, if it's off, after the tire is resting on the rim, you can adjust the position by moving the liner and stem into better position.
    With the lock ring, note there is a notch with 2 rivets above it (Picture #7), place the lock ring with the notch 180* opposite the valve stem. I didn't get a good enough image of it, but before you install the rims, note the inner lip of the metal of the lock ring. At approximately 10 and 2ish, if you look, you will note that the material from the lip is notably thinner at those 2 areas, but then fattens back out around the ring up to the notch. That thinner area is what allows you to, once the bottom of the ring is set into the rim around the area of the valve stem, lever the upper section of the ring onto the rest of the rim and secure the wheel and tire.
    So, start by, setting the lockring in place, notch opposite the valve stem, press down on the ring around the area of the valve stem. Once we had the ring attaching to the rim at the valve stem, Gary watched the opposite side of the rim, as Ralph and I stood on the edge of the lock ring to press it into place and, as it fell down below the edge of the rim, we would move from one side of the ring to the other, levering it down. (this is where no personal space issues are helpful, as well as showering) The first one we did, went in fairly easily, up to the points where the material starts to thin around the ring.... Part 1 end.

    Click image for larger version

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