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  • Speedo / Tach / Gauges: Must be an easier way.

    I'm a new member as I recently bought a 1963 Avanti. Among other "projects", I'm working on getting the tach functional. I purchased a new tach sending unit to start with, from what I read, they are not very reliable. I can barely see it above the steering column and even with a mirror, I can't see how it is attached to whatever. Are there any videos showing how to get to it? Any suggestions on how to work in that very confined space? Does it help to drop the steering column? I would appreciate any advice any old sages can provide. Thanks.

  • #2
    Best to remove the steering column completely. 4 attachment nuts and two on the steering box itself. And unhook the wiring harness. No other approach that I know of unless you remove the entire dash. There is a round sender unit can bolted down to the frame of the dash. Another mission impossible when time to remove or replace.
    Start and Stage Your Studebakers

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    • #3
      You may be able to get some access through the speaker opening. In my 83 I removed the plastic cover on the end of the dash and cut a hole large enough to access behind the dash while maintaining the section with the mounting holes. Replacing the plate covered the hole.

      Bob

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      • #4
        First, disconnect the battery!! Remove the tach head and the speedo head, you can get your hand in those 2 holes. There are 2 self tapping screws holding the unit down to the top of the crossbar. I "think" they have a 1/4" head.

        Jim
        "We can't all be Heroes, Some us just need to stand on the curb and clap as they go by" Will Rogers

        We will provide the curb for you to stand on and clap!


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        • #5
          Originally posted by 52 Ragtop View Post
          First, disconnect the battery!! Remove the tach head and the speedo head, you can get your hand in those 2 holes. There are 2 self tapping screws holding the unit down to the top of the crossbar. I "think" they have a 1/4" head.

          Jim
          Been there..........done that. Do just as Jim says. It makes it relatively easy. While the Tach and Speedometer are out, change the bulbs in the Tach and Speedometer and any other gauges you can reach.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by 52 Ragtop View Post
            First, disconnect the battery!! Remove the tach head and the speedo head, you can get your hand in those 2 holes. There are 2 self tapping screws holding the unit down to the top of the crossbar. I "think" they have a 1/4" head.

            Jim
            Have quick disconnect on battery. Are you talking about removing the beezles(SP?) and pushing the instruments in or disconnecting everything from the backs and pulling them out the front? Sounds promising.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by CJM View Post
              Have quick disconnect on battery. Are you talking about removing the beezles(SP?) and pushing the instruments in or disconnecting everything from the backs and pulling them out the front? Sounds promising.
              Disconnect from the back, and pull them out from the front. Then you can get both hands in behind the dash.

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              • #8
                I can verify that the method proposed for getting to the tach sender will work. But no one has addressed the question of the accuracy of the tach sender available from SI.

                Since some people from time to time on this list have questioned the quality and accuracy of the sender sold by SI, I thought I would give you the results of some testing I did, for what it is worth.

                First, the needle of the tachometer held very steady at the various rpm levels. I mention this because I remember someone complaining that after installing the SI unit the tach needle jumped around a bit and would not hold steady. Well, that was not my experience and I am pleased that mine seemed capable of holding very steady.

                I next did a comparison test. I have a solid state Craftsman meter that can measure rpms, dwell, voltage, points, etc. It is about 25 years old, but still seems to work fine, though I really cannot vouch for its accuracy. Here is how RPM readings of the Craftsman meter and the Avanti tachometer compared at various rpms. The first number will be the Craftsman reading and the second will be the Avant tach reading: 700/725; 1,000/1,025; 1,100/1,175; 1,200/1300; 1,300/1,400; 1,400/1,500; 1,500/1,600; 1,600/1,725; 1,700/1,950; 1,800/1,950; 1,900/2,000; 2,000/2,2,200.

                Looking at this you will notice that at 700 rpm on the Craftsman, the Avanti reads only 25 rpm higher. But at 2,000 rpm on the Craftsman, the Avanit tach registers 200 rpm higher, and at several points going up the scale there are several significant jumps where the two meters move further apart. Any thoughts on how the two compare? Does anyone have any ideas on which might be the more accurate? There is a potentiometer on the SI unit that allows for adjustment, but at this point I am not inclined to touch it. Do you experts out there agree that it would be smart to leave it alone, especially since I cannot verify the accuracy of the Craftsman meter?
                Stan Gundry
                www.AvantiPublishing.com

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