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Phillips Bit For Door Hinges

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  • Body: Phillips Bit For Door Hinges

    I plan to adjust the doors again for the 63GT, and am tired of making do with whatever I can find to loosen & tighten the huge Phillips head screws that hold the hinges in place on the doors. I have scoured ebay, and find nothing that looks suitable. Does anyone know where to find a bit large enough for this job, probably about a #5 or #6?. Preferably something of high quality, such as Snap-On, but I will go with whatever I can find.

    Thanks,
    Joe H

  • #2
    I used a # 4 from Mac tools. It seemed to be the right size, but others with more knowledge can correct me, if wrong.

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    • #3
      I would suggest finding a tool distributor like Mac, Matco or Snap-On. On my Larks I've used a #4 and some worked better with a Pozi-drive bit.
      Tom
      sigpic

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      • #4
        Looks like the largest Snap-On and Sears make is #4, so that must be the size. I was thinking it was a little bigger. I used to have a 1/2" drive bit that was perfect for the job, but it wore out years ago. Would love to find the same tool, preferably in Snap-on or Sears.

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        • #5
          If you don't use an impact driver you stand a good chance of rounding out the head of the screw.

          Treblig

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          • #6
            Yes, totally agree, an Impact driver AND some red Lok-Tite
            64 GT Hawk (K7)
            1970 Avanti (R3)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by JoeHall View Post
              I plan to adjust the doors again for the 63GT, and am tired of making do with whatever I can find to loosen & tighten the huge Phillips head screws that hold the hinges in place on the doors. I have scoured ebay, and find nothing that looks suitable. Does anyone know where to find a bit large enough for this job, probably about a #5 or #6?. Preferably something of high quality, such as Snap-On, but I will go with whatever I can find.

              Thanks,
              Joe H
              This is what you need- a genuine Studebaker factory door hinge screw driver.
              Attached Files
              Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
              '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

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              • #8
                Originally posted by 64V-K7 View Post
                Yes, totally agree, an Impact driver AND some red Lok-Tite
                A dab of valve lapping compound on the phillips bit will also work.

                Comment


                • #9
                  My old craftsman impact driver comes with a #4 bit which looks like a fit for the door hinge screws. You probably need an impact driver for the job anyway. My set is old and american made and I would guess the new ones are chinese as most of the new craftsman tools are and not worth buying. Maybe someone you know has an old set to loan.

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                  • #10
                    I have went through several of the Chinese impact drivers over the years. Have also drilled those hinge screws all the way through, then installed a 5/16" shank bolt through the remaining cone. That avoided future problems, since the Phillips head then becomes a 1/2' hex head bolt. Was just hoping to do it a little easier this time around. The screws should not be rusted in place, since I had both doors off for a paint job about 3-4 years ago.

                    When they were off for the paint job, I replaced the original screws with repro screws, from one of our vendors. But on closer inspection this morning, I find those screw heads are actually, "posidrive", which is similar to Phillips, but different. So that explains why the #4 Phillips was a little loose, and probably why I (obviously) did not get them tightened enough 3-4 years ago.

                    Once I knew what I was looking for, shopping on ebay became a little easier. A few minutes ago, off ebay, I bought a set of Apex/posidrive bits, including size #4. So will see what shows up in the mail.

                    Thanks much for everyone's help.
                    Joe H
                    Last edited by JoeHall; 09-24-2017, 01:46 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Just for the record, Snap-On used to (and I think still does) sell #4 Phillips and Posi-Drive bits that fit into a 5/16" (I think) socket. One of them is specifically designed to remove stuck screws, and has little teeth built into one side of each tooth on the business end of the bit. You use it only for removal.
                      Skip Lackie

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                      • #12
                        Skip, I believe you are describing a posidrive bit. Here is what I learned today from wikipedia:

                        Pozidriv[edit]
                        Screw Head - Pozidrive.svg

                        Screws with the Pozidriv head.
                        The Pozidriv (sometimes spelled incorrectly as "Pozidrive") is an improved version of the Phillips screw drive, and is specified as ANSI Type IA Cross Recess. Pozidriv was jointly patented by the Phillips Screw Company and American Screw Company. The name is thought[by whom?] to be a portmanteau of the words "positive" and "drive." Its advantage over Phillips drives is its decreased likelihood to cam out, which allows greater torque to be applied.[6][20][21][22] In ANSI standards, it is referred to as "Type IA".[16] It is very similar to, and essentially compatible with, the Supadriv screw drive.[23]

                        Pozidriv drive bits are often designated by the letters "PZ" plus a size code of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 (by order of increasing size);[6] the numerical bit size codes do not necessarily correspond to nominal screw size numbers.

                        Attempting to use a Phillips screwdriver bit is likely to cause damage because the design difference between them is fairly significant even though at first glance they appear to be very similar.[6] A Phillips driver has an angle on the flanks, a pointed tip and rounded corners. The Pozidriv screwdrivers have straight sided flanks, a blunt tip and additional smaller ribs at 45° to the main slots.[6] The Pozidriv was designed specifically to allow much greater torque to be applied because of its more positive engagement.[6]

                        The Pozidriv screws are visually distinguishable from Phillips by a set of radial indentations (or "tick marks") set at 45° from the main cross recess on the head of the screw.[6] The manufacturing process for Pozidriv screwdriver bits is slightly more complex. The Phillips driver has four simple slots cut into it, whereas in the Pozidriv each slot is the result of two machining processes at right angles. The result of this is that the arms of the cross are parallel-sided with the Pozidriv, and tapered with the Phillips.[20]

                        The chief disadvantage of Pozidriv screws is that they are visually quite similar to Phillips; thus many people are unaware of the difference or do not own the correct drivers for them, and often use an incorrect screwdriver. This results in difficulty with removing the screw and damage to the recess or driver, often rendering any subsequent use of a correct screwdriver unsatisfactory. Phillips screwdrivers will loosely fit in and turn Pozidriv screws, but will cam out if enough torque is applied, potentially damaging the screw head or driver. Because the drive wings on a Pozidriv screwdriver are square edged, their fit in a Phillips screw head is even worse, so they are more likely to slip or tear out the screw head.[6]

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                        • #13
                          I now know, the screws I received from one of our vendors are, in fact, Pozidriv screws, since they have the identifying, "radial indentations" described above. Hopefully, the bits coming in the mail will deal with them properly.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by COMMANDERPINK1 View Post
                            ... some worked better with a Pozi-drive bit.
                            Joe,
                            Hopefully the bits are Posi-drive, not simply Phillips.
                            Those screws are, in fact, Posi-drive screws! And using a standard Phillips drive is a sure way to render them soon unusable. Once that posi-drive is worn out of them there is almost no way to get them tight enough to hold the weight of a door. Here is one example of where the correct tool is the one for the job.

                            "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                            Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                            Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                            sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

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                            • #15
                              It has now been quite a few years since I sold them, but for these kinds of tool bits, the APEX brand was always the best. There are others, but APEX had the best quality control in terms of tool steel quality and the key..."Heat Treat." I sold these in bulk to industrial manufacturing facilities. Dozens of boxes at the time to furniture manufacturers. Once, when their workers went on strike, we substituted the so-called second best brand. It was a disaster. For a couple of weeks, I had to take back and credit more of this type of drive bit than ever before, or after in my career.

                              So...if they supply the size needed...look for an industrial distributor like "Ferguson Enterprises," or Dillon Supply, and see if they offer "walk-in" counter sales. If so, it is well worth the effort.
                              John Clary
                              Greer, SC

                              SDC member since 1975

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