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DELCO Rotor Failure

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  • #31
    I know that this is beating the proverbial dead horse, but I finally got an Echlin RR157 rotor and wanted to show the difference between it and the DR 309. There is quarter inch difference in length. I thought the rotor tip should be within thousandths of the contacts inside the distributor cap. Does the spark really jump that far for those using the DR309?

    Of course, I bought that DR309 off e-Bay, so what was actually in the box might have been switched at some point or other.

    All this probably means nothing for me as I epoxied a copper wire in the original rotor shown in the background and I’ll be using that.

    Tom

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    • #32
      Just came in from changing the rotor on my '61 Hawk. Dist. is original equipment Delco. The rotor I took out was like the bottom one in post#25. I got a DR 949 from Auto-Zone (6.99 +tax). Looks like the top one in the picture marked RR157 in post #31. Fit very tight on the shaft. Box says made in USA!! Started with no problem Gonna epoxy the original for a spare.-Jim

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      • #33
        Originally posted by jrlemke View Post
        Just came in from changing the rotor on my '61 Hawk. Dist. is original equipment Delco. The rotor I took out was like the bottom one in post#25. I got a DR 949 from Auto-Zone (6.99 +tax). Looks like the top one in the picture marked RR157 in post #31. Fit very tight on the shaft. Box says made in USA!! Started with no problem Gonna epoxy the original for a spare.-Jim
        The last one that failed on my Stude still had the carbon rod in place. So you might wanna pop that rod out ad replace it with a piece of wire,, a nail, or something else that is sure to carry the current. I also had one fail where the rod popped out. But for the last one, simply epoxying it would not have fixed the problem, as the rod lost its continuity, though still in place.

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