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Stupid fuel question

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  • Fuel System: Stupid fuel question

    If I buy a fuel pump rebuilt to handle unleaded /ethanol fuel I can still continue to use the non-ethanol adding the lead alternative safely correct?

    My thinking is replacing everything as they need to be replaced, with parts that can handle the unleaded/ethanol fuel, for that just in case I need to use it.
    Thank you,
    Darryl Dodd LMT, Neural Reset Practitioner
    Essential Transformations LLC
    www.essentialtransformations.com

  • #2
    Yes, you can.

    As far as older parts and ethanol cut fuel.
    The ethanol in the E5/E10 will slowly leach the oils out of the older rubber compounds.
    This will cause the rubber to degrade and start to flake off.
    Bad news for needle and seats, diaphragms, and rubber gaskets and hoses.
    It takes a long time, but setting is as bad as running.

    Newer rubber formulations are made from materials less susceptible to this issue.



    Originally posted by ETLMT View Post
    If I buy a fuel pump rebuilt to handle unleaded /ethanol fuel I can still continue to use the non-ethanol adding the lead alternative safely correct?

    My thinking is replacing everything as they need to be replaced, with parts that can handle the unleaded/ethanol fuel, for that just in case I need to use it.
    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

    Jeff


    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

    Comment


    • #3
      Thank you DeepNHock!

      From what I am reading I do NOT need to add a "lead additive"? Is this true?

      I found the following on a website, do you feel it is complete?
      https://www.bellperformance.com/blog...-fuel-problems

      Seven Steps to Avoid Ethanol Fuel Problems in Your Classic Car

      1. Use ethanol-resistant hoses or nylon tubing to replace any plastic or rubber fuel lines.
      2. Replace fiberglass fuel tanks with a stainless steel tank.
      3. Use a water separator filter in the fuel line leading to the carburetor. Since water collects in the filter, you can easily remove it.
      4. Change out any O-rings in the fuel system to ethanol compatible rings.
      5. A carburetor fogging solution prevents condensation from filling fuel bowls.
      6. Use a flex-fuel-compatible fuel filter as it stops degradation of the fuel filter media.
      7. Use a non-alcohol based fuel treatment to prevent excessive water collection in your fuel. Ethanol based fuel treatments worsen problems caused by E10 gas.

      Following these steps adds to your short-term costs but will protect your car from problems associated with E10 fuel.
      Thank you,
      Darryl Dodd LMT, Neural Reset Practitioner
      Essential Transformations LLC
      www.essentialtransformations.com

      Comment


      • #4
        I read, may have been on this forum, or maybe in a Haggerty news bulletin, that adding a quart or half gallon of diesel fuel to a tank of gas will help lubricate engine parts that the new fuels have caused problems with. This may include some rubber parts, but I'm not sure. It will not cause a problem with excess exhaust smoking.
        sigpic1966 Daytona (The First One)
        1950 Champion Convertible
        1950 Champion 4Dr
        1955 President 2 Dr Hardtop
        1957 Thunderbird

        Comment


        • #5
          Here are some comments to your post...

          Originally posted by ETLMT View Post
          Thank you DeepNHock!

          From what I am reading I do NOT need to add a "lead additive"? Is this true?

          Depends. The lead substitute is for lubricating the valve lip to valve seat contact point.
          If you are using your Studebaker like a truck 12 months a year and working it hard... Yes, an additive will help prevent valve seat recession in the head.
          But if you are only doing occaisional driving, and light duty at that... We'll all be dust before your seats are shot.
          It won't hurt anything to add some if it makes you feel better.


          I found the following on a website, do you feel it is complete?
          https://www.bellperformance.com/blog...-fuel-problems

          Seven Steps to Avoid Ethanol Fuel Problems in Your Classic Car

          1. Use ethanol-resistant hoses or nylon tubing to replace any plastic or rubber fuel lines.
            Yes, but pass on the nylon tubing (melts too easy). Use fuel injection rated hose if you can.
          2. Replace fiberglass fuel tanks with a stainless steel tank.
            Sounds like a diesel thing to me...
          3. Use a water separator filter in the fuel line leading to the carburetor. Since water collects in the filter, you can easily remove it.
            Not a bad idea. But something else to get screwed up. Just run your gas through the car quickly.
          4. Change out any O-rings in the fuel system to ethanol compatible rings.
            Agree
          5. A carburetor fogging solution prevents condensation from filling fuel bowls.
            Huh? Spraying something through the venturis does NOTHING for the fuel bowls...
          6. Use a flex-fuel-compatible fuel filter as it stops degradation of the fuel filter media.
            True. Most fibre media fuel filters have a glue that is not alcohol compatible.
          7. Use a non-alcohol based fuel treatment to prevent excessive water collection in your fuel. Ethanol based fuel treatments worsen problems caused by E10 gas.
            True.
            Just make sure you understand the difference between aDsorbtion, and aBsortion.

            (copy)
            Absorption is the process in which a fluid is dissolved by a liquid or a solid (absorbent). Adsorption is the process in which atoms, ions or molecules from a substance (it could be gas, liquid or dissolved solid) adhere to a surface of the adsorbent. Adsorption is a surface-based process where a film of adsorbate is created on the surface while absorption involves the entire volume of the absorbing substance.

          Following these steps adds to your short-term costs but will protect your car from problems associated with E10 fuel.
          HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

          Jeff


          Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



          Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

          Comment

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