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Steering wheel issue 1942 Commander

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  • Steering: Steering wheel issue 1942 Commander

    Hello everyone. I have a steering wheel issue. I have a 1942 Commander and am having a helluva time trying to get the steering wheel off. I am down through three layers, all with the same bolt size, but the puller I got from Stude can't work on this one. First there are no holes to latch onto, second I don't know where the large bolt you would have to screw could attach. I tried with my big socket, 1 and 5/16 inch, but nothing doing. How can I get this off? It is counterclockwise yes? Why does this bolt have zigzag cuts on the inner part? There is a second bolt under that as you can see and not sure about that one either. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks, JP





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  • #2
    You need a puller like Chuck Collins has pictured on his help pages, https://www.studebakerparts.com/stud.../swpuller.html

    Be careful so as not to ruin the threads and the shaft. I generally loosen the nut and soak the shaft with something like PB Blaster for a couple days to loosen up any rust on the splined shaft.
    Milt

    1947 Champion (owned since 1967)
    1961 Hawk 4-speed
    1967 Avanti
    1961 Lark 2 door
    1988 Avanti Convertible

    Member of SDC since 1973

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    • #3
      They make a steering wheel puller for Model A Fords that might work on your 1942.

      Here is a link to one of the vendors who sells them: http://www.snydersantiqueauto.com/steering-wheel-puller

      Do a Google search and your will find others with similar products.
      Dan Peterson
      Montpelier, VT
      1960 Lark V-8 Convertible
      1960 Lark V-8 Convertible (parts car)

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      • #4
        Thanks guys. I do have an additional question on that. The long pin that seems to go down into the hub or column- what does it latch onto as there is nothing but hollow space. Unless there is a 1 5/16th socket at the end of that pin and you crank that at the top? I can't find any picture to show exactly what is happening. I already spent on one puller that didn't di anything. Your right though- I don't want to strip the column or the threads! So a big socket wrench even with PB Blaster is not a good idea?

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        • #5
          i wouldn't have posted about the PB Blaster, etc. on the other thread if i thought it wasn't a good idea to try. i've used it on double "nutted" rusty bolts in the past few years. if it doesn't work, the most you'd be out is the cost of a can of the PB Blaster. and i can guarantee you'll find more uses for the product. i did on the '40 Champion as well as many other vehicles.
          Kerry. SDC Member #A012596W. ENCSDC member.

          '51 Champion Business Coupe - (Tom's Car). Purchased 11/2012.

          '40 Champion. sold 10/11. '63 Avanti R-1384. sold 12/10.

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          • #6
            If you can get one an impact wrench will take that right off. Barring that put your socket wrench on and bump the handle with something like a chunk of 2x4. That nut was intended to be self-locking and has been on there a really long time but it probably is not really rusted. My "puller" cost me about $8 at Harbor Frieght but I already had the pitman arm puller:

            Pictures of my process here:
            http://stude.vonadatech.com/wp/steering-wheel-removal/

            Nathan
            _______________
            http://stude.vonadatech.com
            https://jeepster.vonadatech.com

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            • #7
              You guys are all awesome, thanks!

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              • #8
                My oldest Studebaker is 1948, so, I don't know if there is much different between mine and your 1942. But, every steering wheel, I have pulled, has a strong spring underneath. So, once you pop the wheel up off the shaft, be prepared to deal with the spring. It shouldn't be a problem until you need to reinstall the steering wheel. Then you will wonder why it was so difficult to remove?
                Because you will have to push down so hard to get the nut back on the steering shaft.
                John Clary
                Greer, SC

                SDC member since 1975

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                • #9
                  Disregard my comments on the general forum sight, I didn't know that there was a duplicate post.

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