Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Camshaft regrinder

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Engine: Camshaft regrinder

    I'm looking for a cost-effective cam grinder to change the stock 259 grind to an R1/R2 grind. I hear good things about doing this. Maybe someone could chime that has done this and if it was worth it.

    Thanks!

  • #2
    Hi,

    I've got them on the shelf, $100 exchange, plus shipping.

    As to being worth it, how often do you shift above 3,000 RPMs? If you're like me and really drive your Studes, an R1 cam is fun. If you just poop around, save your money.

    Also, budget for a spring change. New R1 springs are necessary.

    jack vines
    PackardV8

    Comment


    • #3
      I do not know of any in your area. Here in So.Cal we have Iskenderian or Precision Cams in Whitter. Isky has his ST5 at $85 or so depending on the mood. Precision Cams has their R2+ they made for Stone, $65-$70. But then there is shipping. Jack was faster than I on the post, it is a few bucks more but you will get it a lot faster and with less headaches.
      Last edited by Alan; 08-14-2017, 01:10 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        The only one I've ever used is Delta cams in Tacoma. They do a nice job and they have all the correct formulas from stock to R-1 thru R-4 ( and both R-3 Cams)

        Comment


        • #5
          Jack,
          well as I currently have an extremely tired and knocking OHV six, 3,000 rpms is not a real possibility. I am building a somewhat uprated 259 for my lark. The heads (which appear to be #1557571 heads and yield 10.25:1 compression when used with the flat pistons I have) are getting some work done right now anyway, so the R1 springs shouldn't be a difficult upgrade. Are they hard to find?

          Alan,
          thanks for the information. I may contact some of those shops. I'm actually wearing an Iskenderian Racing Camshafts t-shirt right now. Sounds like I haven't earned it yet

          - - - Updated - - -

          I have a delta camshaft on my Isuzu (yes, I like the off-brands)! I should give them a call.

          Comment


          • #6
            All 259" engines have flat top pistons. These pistons and the stroke of the 259 yield something in the range of 8.5 to 1 compression ratio, plus or minus, depending on the head and gasket used.
            The flat top piston specifically for the 289" yields the higher compression, since the longer stroke cylinder volume is more in relation to the combustion chamber volume.

            Comment


            • #7
              Doesn't the 259 piston fit way down in the hole? IIRC something on the order of .045 (or more) so the total quench is a horrible .070 or there about.
              Bez Auto Alchemy
              573-318-8948
              http://bezautoalchemy.com


              "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

              Comment


              • #8
                If you have "289 Flat Top Avanti" Pistons for your 259, you will need a 289 Crank.

                If they are just stock 259 "Flat Top" Pistons the compression will be as Jerry (studebaker center of oregon) said.

                The Wrist Pin locations in the 259/289 Pistons are WAY different so do not interchange.
                StudeRich
                Second Generation Stude Driver,
                Proud '54 Starliner Owner

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by bezhawk View Post
                  Doesn't the 259 piston fit way down in the hole? IIRC something on the order of .045 (or more) so the total quench is a horrible .070 or there about.
                  The combustion chamber total volume can be in the head, and it can be in the piston top shape - dished or domed - or it can be in the cylinder block.
                  I always tell people to look at a cross section of a 348" Chevrolet engine. Most of the combustion chamber volume is in the block. Does that make it wrong?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Phil Harris at Fairborne Studebaker has reground cams in stock, and sells them on an exchange basis.

                    Phil Harris, Owner
                    4300 State Route 235
                    Fairborn, Ohio 45324


                    Office - 937-878-1576
                    Fax - 937-878-8172

                    http://fairbornstudebaker.com/WP/
                    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                    Jeff


                    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I misread some information I found on the internet, which is so odd, because everything on the internet is true
                      It would be an easy calculation if someone knows the deck height and cylinder head volume. I can measure it when I put the pistons in, but it would be nice to know ahead of time. I may have a lead on a 289 short block that is more or less stuck to alleviate, but I don't think I want to get that involved. I think the 259 is going to be just fine.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Use this calculator:

                        https://www.uempistons.com/index.php...02b071ca50358c

                        It requires knowing head gasket thickness, deck height and on stock 289"s, the dish volume.

                        FWIW, many Stude heads have been rebuilt at least once and had the heads surfaced. A rare few have gotten the hot rod treatment and been milled .060" to .125". They need to be measured to determine actual combustion chamber volume.

                        jack vines
                        PackardV8

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Yea...another place to "verify".
                          "Knowing" the deck height and guessing are two different things. If one were to guess or go by the "book" value, and the block deck and or heads have been milled...you could be way off.

                          Mike

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            http://www.oregoncamshaft.com/

                            I had him grind a little extra HP for my truck 245.....getting ready to fire it up.....so I hope it's good. But a good company to deal with, rectified a problem quickly and efficiently, totally satisfied in the end

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              port alignment

                              Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
                              Use this calculator:

                              https://www.uempistons.com/index.php...02b071ca50358c

                              It requires knowing head gasket thickness, deck height and on stock 289"s, the dish volume.

                              FWIW, many Stude heads have been rebuilt at least once and had the heads surfaced. A rare few have gotten the hot rod treatment and been milled .060" to .125". They need to be measured to determine actual combustion chamber volume.

                              jack vines
                              If you whack .125 off of the head surface, what happens to the port alignment between the head and the intake manifold~? Can that nisalignment be corrected~?

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X