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  • Ignition: Coil cross-reference needed

    Looking for a cross reference for Studebaker PN 519977 ignition coil for a 1949 2R5 with a 170ci six, 6vdc positive ground. has the 35A generator.
    1949 2r5 28196
    170ci 6cyl
    4spd

  • #2
    the 1957 NAPA catalog states Echlin IC-7.

    It states that it is the same as all 47-49 six cylinder, plus Champions from 47-55
    RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

    17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
    10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
    10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
    4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
    5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
    56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
    60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

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    • #3
      NAPA can usually cross original Stude part numbers in a lot of cases....

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      • #4
        Hi,
        I have a 48 Champion with an Echlin IC-7 coil and want to check to see if it's still working correctly but I can't find the specs that it should reach on the two tests it suggest.
        Any suggestions ????
        Thanks,
        JRC

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        • #5
          The best way to test an ignition coil is checking its output on an engine scope. Other than that you can check the primary and secondary coil winding resistance. I checked my spare IC7 and it shows 1.1 ohms on the primary winding and the secondary shows 5,100 ohms. Have you checked for a good spark while cranking the engine and with the engine running? There are other problems that can mimic a bad coil such as bad connections in the electrical system, dirty or corroded points and a defective condenser. Bud

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          • #6
            That sounds like a pretty marginal coil. Primary should be 1.2 or 1.3 Ohms and secondary over 10,000.

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            • #7
              A good 6 volt coil has a nominal resistance of 1 ohm. 12 volt coils have a nominal resistance of 1.3 to 1.5 ohms on the primary winding. The secondary resistance will vary from manufacturer to manufacturer. The IC7 coil I checked for resistance a few days ago does test good when checked with a scope on a running engine. Bud

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              • #8
                For a Studebaker cross-reference you can use 526689 or 1544373.
                Dan Peterson
                Montpelier, VT
                1960 Lark V-8 Convertible
                1960 Lark V-8 Convertible (parts car)

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                • #9
                  Have a nos 6v Delco on the shelf. Checked it just for fun and it tested 1.3 ohms on the primary winding and 6,000on the secondary .

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                  • #10
                    In the days gone by GM, Chrysler, Ford and a few other models used 6 volt coils and there was a few different manufacturers also. Some were negative and some were positive ground, some were 4,6,8,12 and 16 cylinder engines, I don't think any were sensitive to the type of ground. Therefore wouldn't any 6 volt coil work on a Studebaker?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Bud View Post
                      12 volt coils have a nominal resistance of 1.3 to 1.5 ohms on the primary winding.
                      Just a precision. This is only true on vehicles equipped with a ballast resistor or a pink wire. The other ones usually have a much higher primary resistance (around 3.5 - 4 ohms).
                      Here are the values for a 1960 Studebaker 6.

                      sigpic

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                      • #12
                        Good Grief!!! You guys impress me! (& humble me)...While I know a little about a lot of things...I know very little about a lot of things. Coil specs are a good example. For all these years, all the cars, equipment, engines, etc...I have always pretty much focused on coil Voltage (6 or 12) and physical size. If it's the correct voltage and fits...grab the nearest one, hook it up and if it works...good to go.

                        For the most part, I have gotten away with it. However, a few years ago, I had a coil fail on an old lawn tractor. So, I ambled into the pole barn and grabbed the first coil I came to that was in a pile of old used Studebaker take-off's. Brushed off the dirt, stuck it on and began mowing a large overgrown area. After about a quarter acre of mowing, I began smelling something burning. Then I noticed smoke coming from the coil as it began to liquify and boil. I assumed it must have been a 6-volt coil. Replaced it with a 12-volt and kept on mowing.

                        You've heard the saying "ignorance is bliss"...but sometimes it is an embarrassing "Miss!"
                        John Clary
                        Greer, SC

                        SDC member since 1975

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                        • #13
                          To tell you the truth, John, this is fairly new to me as I did not have to investigate this before my Hawk joined the flock.As my car is equipped with the pink wire, I wanted to be sure I had the right coil. Moreover, ballasted ignition systems are almost unheard of in France. In fact, on all my old cars, I could interchange coils without any troubles, except for the only one which has a 6V system.
                          About the coil you fried, be very cautious if this happens again as the oil used for isolation is a highly dangerous pollutant.This could harm you or your animals.
                          Nice weekend to all
                          sigpic

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