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  • wdills
    replied
    Sounds like you are having your local shop do the rebuild. I suggest you personally verify the oil galley plug that is accessible down the distributor tower is installed before your distributor gets installed. Leaving this plug out is a common oversight made by machine shops that are not familiar with Studebaker engines. I didn't know to verify it when I had my first engine built by a local shop and it cost me an engine.

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  • plee4139
    replied
    I think that may very well be the case. The work is nearing completion and there's still no definitive answer for the engine failure. Water stains were found on the head gasket but the car has never overheated.

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  • PackardV8
    replied
    I had a similar experience and the oil galleys were severely restricted with debris. . . . I consider myself a competent engine re-builder as I have done several over the years, however I have never given consideration to the oil galleys and presumed they were always clear, until this time.
    Agree. As previously mentioned, unless both rear block plugs, both plugs in the rocker shaft and the rocker adjuster screws are removed and rodded out, there will be crud.

    jack vines

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  • altair
    replied
    I agree with Richard, the bearings are not the fault I would not be too quick to condemn the bearings unless you are absolutely sure. I had a similar experience and the oil galleys were severely restricted with debris. The oil pressure was good 40-45 lbs/sqin, however there was limited volume. The bearings were badly scrubbed only after 12 hours of running. Perhaps the oil galleys should be reconfirmed.

    I consider myself a competent engine re-builder as I have done several over the years, however I have never given consideration to the oil galleys and presumed they were always clear, until this time.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ron Dame
    replied
    Any update on what your mechanic found?

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    This is how I would decode it:

    Originally posted by dpson View Post
    /Cut/

    17870P = Studebaker V8 Rod Bearing

    F/m = Federal Mogul

    .010US = .010 Undersize

    06 99 = June 1999

    727 H = Internal FM coding

    I would doubt that the Bearings were at fault, in THIS case

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  • HUDSONBROTHER1
    replied
    One other thing that can kill bearings all most instantly is if the oil pump pick up is too close to the bottom of the oil pan.

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  • dpson
    replied
    Sorry for the confusion on the pictures I posted showing the damaged bearings. The engine was still running and didn't knock when removed, however had very low oil pressure. The crankshaft journals were scoured and will need to be turned if that engine is to be used again.

    Someone asked about the markings on the back of the bearings, I cant take a good photo of them so here is a transcription (main bearing shown in photo above):

    17870P
    F/m
    .010US
    06 99
    727 H
    Last edited by dpson; 07-01-2017, 11:26 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • 4jc8z
    replied
    Originally posted by JoeHall View Post
    In other words, they won't grind the bearings down in future use (but will, "bed in" to the bearings).
    Note, some of the reproduction Tri-metal bearings floating around do not have enough babbit bearing material on them to "bed in". The old Clevite tri-metals did, but the new sealed power ones sold by vendors don't. We went through that in 2011.

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  • JoeHall
    replied
    I'd wait and see what the bearings & crank look like when the machinist removes the bearings. If the worst journal in the crank is not grooved sufficiently to catch your fingernail, when raked across the journal, side to side, the crank may be polish-able. Even if it does have moderate grooves, remember the grooves run long wise, and not crosswise. In other words, they won't grind the bearings down in future use (but will, "bed in" to the bearings). Most likely, the worst journals will be #3 for the mains, and #1/2 for the rods, but insect them all very closely.

    Depending on your plans for the car, polishing and new bearings may still be OK. If you doubt you will ever put more than 5000 miles on the car, and could care less about an estate sale after your demise, polishing may be a consideration, depending on the worst journal, as explained above.

    Leave a comment:


  • 6hk71400
    replied
    If I had to have an engine rebuilt, I would find a way to get it to Jack Vines, based on all the information I have collected here on the forum. Jack is relatively close for me but not you Peter. After all, I would be confident that the work that Jack did would last the rest of my lifetime and use.

    There must be somebody on the eastern United States that is a Studebaker expert like Jack. The other advise is just as good: getting a good engine out of a otherwise non restorable car and use that.

    Best of Luck
    Bob Miles
    Tucson AZ

    Leave a comment:


  • Tom Bredehoft
    replied
    Originally posted by studegary View Post
    buy a good running 289,
    I did that several years ago when I rebuilt my '55 Land Cruiser. The 259 was frozen, I found a (nearly local) Studebaker dealer who had an unopened (didn't know what it looked like inside) full flow '63 289 for less than $1000. I bought it, knowing rebuild prices. Took it home, pulled one head off to look at the valves, etc. I found there was only about .0001 taper (yeah, that's 3 zeros) in the cylinders, (original size) they still had crosshatch in them from when first assembled.) The engine did use oil, but after 6 years, it's around a quart in 1000 miles. It's almost new, runs well. I can recommend the concept, if not a particular engine.

    Leave a comment:


  • studegary
    replied
    Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
    On any rebuilding quote, ask what new parts are included and what is being remachined. Lots of very necessary little things non-Stude shops don't always include, such as completely disassembling the rocker shafts and rocker arms, cleaning internally and regrinding rocker tips is three hours of shop time. Are they remachining the connecting rod big ends? Do they know there are two very-difficult-to-remove plugs in the rear of the block? Most don't bother, but then they don't get the oil galleys cleaned.

    To do a Stude long block correctly, cleaned, shot blasted, painted with all new wear parts and the block, crank, cam, rods and rockers remachined, figure a minimum of $3,000. Blueprinted, to include align honing main bores, square decking block, balancing, runs about $4,000.

    Your opinions and results may vary.

    jack vines
    I completely support what Jack said.

    Another approach that would be quicker and probably a lot cheaper is to buy a good running 289, perhaps in a rusty or wrecked hulk, and install that engine in your car.

    Leave a comment:


  • PackardV8
    replied
    Originally posted by plee4139 View Post
    If indeed, the worst-case scenario of a complete or nearly complete engine rebuild is needed, how much can I realistically expect to pay? Remember this is through a legitimate engine rebuilder, so please no "My friend did it on weekends for $50 in parts he got from e-bay."
    On any rebuilding quote, ask what new parts are included and what is being remachined. Lots of very necessary little things non-Stude shops don't always include, such as completely disassembling the rocker shafts and rocker arms, cleaning internally and regrinding rocker tips is three hours of shop time. Are they remachining the connecting rod big ends? Do they know there are two very-difficult-to-remove plugs in the rear of the block? Most don't bother, but then they don't get the oil galleys cleaned.

    To do a Stude long block correctly, cleaned, shot blasted, painted with all new wear parts and the block, crank, cam, rods and rockers remachined, figure a minimum of $3,000. Blueprinted, to include align honing main bores, square decking block, balancing, runs about $4,000.

    Your opinions and results may vary.

    jack vines

    Leave a comment:


  • studegary
    replied
    Originally posted by wittsend View Post
    Those pictures are not from plee4139 the original poster who suggested he has spun bearings. They are from dpson. Quote post number 10 "Here is a photo of the bearings removed from my 289." Dpson never claimed the pictured image was spun bearings, only that he had a suspicion of "bad bearings."
    Yes, you are correct about the pictures.
    With the subject/title by plee4139 of "spun bearings" as the diagnosis on an engine that was still running well enough that he was advised that he could continue to drive it, I would still be wary of the mechanic/shop.

    Leave a comment:

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