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  • #31
    Sorry for the confusion on the pictures I posted showing the damaged bearings. The engine was still running and didn't knock when removed, however had very low oil pressure. The crankshaft journals were scoured and will need to be turned if that engine is to be used again.

    Someone asked about the markings on the back of the bearings, I cant take a good photo of them so here is a transcription (main bearing shown in photo above):

    17870P
    F/m
    .010US
    06 99
    727 H
    Last edited by dpson; 07-01-2017, 12:26 PM.
    Dan Peterson
    Montpelier, VT
    1960 Lark V-8 Convertible
    1960 Lark V-8 Convertible (parts car)

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    • #32
      One other thing that can kill bearings all most instantly is if the oil pump pick up is too close to the bottom of the oil pan.

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      • #33
        This is how I would decode it:

        Originally posted by dpson View Post
        /Cut/

        17870P = Studebaker V8 Rod Bearing

        F/m = Federal Mogul

        .010US = .010 Undersize

        06 99 = June 1999

        727 H = Internal FM coding

        I would doubt that the Bearings were at fault, in THIS case
        StudeRich
        Second Generation Stude Driver,
        Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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        • #34
          Any update on what your mechanic found?
          Ron Dame
          '63 Champ

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          • #35
            I agree with Richard, the bearings are not the fault I would not be too quick to condemn the bearings unless you are absolutely sure. I had a similar experience and the oil galleys were severely restricted with debris. The oil pressure was good 40-45 lbs/sqin, however there was limited volume. The bearings were badly scrubbed only after 12 hours of running. Perhaps the oil galleys should be reconfirmed.

            I consider myself a competent engine re-builder as I have done several over the years, however I have never given consideration to the oil galleys and presumed they were always clear, until this time.

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            • #36
              I had a similar experience and the oil galleys were severely restricted with debris. . . . I consider myself a competent engine re-builder as I have done several over the years, however I have never given consideration to the oil galleys and presumed they were always clear, until this time.
              Agree. As previously mentioned, unless both rear block plugs, both plugs in the rocker shaft and the rocker adjuster screws are removed and rodded out, there will be crud.

              jack vines
              PackardV8

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              • #37
                I think that may very well be the case. The work is nearing completion and there's still no definitive answer for the engine failure. Water stains were found on the head gasket but the car has never overheated.
                peter lee

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                • #38
                  Sounds like you are having your local shop do the rebuild. I suggest you personally verify the oil galley plug that is accessible down the distributor tower is installed before your distributor gets installed. Leaving this plug out is a common oversight made by machine shops that are not familiar with Studebaker engines. I didn't know to verify it when I had my first engine built by a local shop and it cost me an engine.
                  Wayne
                  "Trying to shed my CASO ways"

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