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  • Engine: Spun bearings

    The machinist just told me that the he found metal in the crankcase and that bearings were spun (don't know how many). Will have to take apart engine to inspect crankshaft. I have always taken care of my car and have only put 15k miles in nine years on the rebuilt engine. How could this happen?
    peter lee

  • #2
    Doesn't makes sense with the information provided.....what was going on when the motor started making noise? What kind of metal did he report finding? Spun bearings don't leave much evidence, other than maybe some glitter. Did he pull the pan? Could be a broken piston rather than a bearing. More details are needed.
    Mike Sal

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    • #3
      What type/size/year is the engine?
      RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

      17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
      10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
      10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
      4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
      5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
      56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
      60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

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      • #4
        Is this the same engine that supposedly had a broken crankshaft?
        Dan Peterson
        Montpelier, VT
        1960 Lark V-8 Convertible
        1960 Lark V-8 Convertible (parts car)

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        • #5
          From the beginning, I REALLY doubted that the engine had a broken crankshaft.
          The bearings may have been installed incorrectly, been of an incorrect size and/or lubrication passages were blocked.
          Why doesn't he just drop the bearing caps for inspection of the crankshaft? I see no need to "take apart the engine to inspect the crankshaft."
          Gary L.
          Wappinger, NY

          SDC member since 1968
          Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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          • #6
            What HE said...^^^^^^^^^^

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Mike Sal View Post
              Doesn't makes sense with the information provided.....what was going on when the motor started making noise? What kind of metal did he report finding? Spun bearings don't leave much evidence, other than maybe some glitter. Did he pull the pan? Could be a broken piston rather than a bearing. More details are needed.
              Mike Sal
              He pulled the pan but won't know more until he explores further.
              peter lee

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by studegary View Post
                From the beginning, I REALLY doubted that the engine had a broken crankshaft.
                The bearings may have been installed incorrectly, been of an incorrect size and/or lubrication passages were blocked.
                Why doesn't he just drop the bearing caps for inspection of the crankshaft? I see no need to "take apart the engine to inspect the crankshaft."
                He did pull the pan. It's possible an oil pump failed or similar problem. Won't know until I hear from him.

                - - - Updated - - -

                Yes. It's from a 289.

                - - - Updated - - -

                Originally posted by RadioRoy View Post
                What type/size/year is the engine?
                It's a 289.
                peter lee

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mike Sal View Post
                  Doesn't makes sense with the information provided.....what was going on when the motor started making noise? What kind of metal did he report finding? Spun bearings don't leave much evidence, other than maybe some glitter. Did he pull the pan? Could be a broken piston rather than a bearing. More details are needed.
                  Mike Sal
                  I was driving at about 65 and after about 35 minutes made a stop and heard the noise. He pulled the pan and said there was copper showing.
                  peter lee

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                  • #10
                    There were reports of a batch of bad bearings (possible made in China) on the market and sold by reputable vendors at about the time period that your engine was rebuilt. I bought a 1962 Lark with a rebuilt V8 from that time period that had low oil pressure. When I pulled the pan all the bearings, both rod and main, were bad and eroded down to the copper backing. You may never know the actual cause, but bad bearing material may be the problem. Here is a photo of the bearings removed from my 289.

                    Click image for larger version

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                    Click image for larger version

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                    Dan Peterson
                    Montpelier, VT
                    1960 Lark V-8 Convertible
                    1960 Lark V-8 Convertible (parts car)

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                    • #11
                      Stude. Oil Pumps do not "Fail", at least it would be EXTREMLY rare, almost impossible if it EVER worked!
                      StudeRich
                      Second Generation Stude Driver,
                      Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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                      • #12
                        if in the end there are bad bearings, please post pictures of any markings on the back of the bearings so that othes on the forum and in the Studebaker communitty may be vigilent and possibly avoid using those same bearings. Signs of all babbit gone down to copper backer left my stomach queasy. Good Luck.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by dpson View Post
                          There were reports of a batch of bad bearings (possible made in China) on the market and sold by reputable vendors at about the time period that your engine was rebuilt. I bought a 1962 Lark with a rebuilt V8 from that time period that had low oil pressure. When I pulled the pan all the bearings, both rod and main, were bad and eroded down to the copper backing. You may never know the actual cause, but bad bearing material may be the problem. Here is a photo of the bearings removed from my 289.

                          [ATTACH=CONFIG]65157[/ATTACH]


                          [ATTACH=CONFIG]65158[/ATTACH]
                          He did mention that they were down to the copper. Your explanation seems to be the most plausible so far. How does this affect the crankshaft?
                          peter lee

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                          • #14
                            Babbit lining a few thousandths thick is the bearing material. copper then steel make up the remainder of the bearing. the Clevite 77 series "Trimetal" bearings are arguably the best but not in all cases. steel back with thick babbitt lining is used where more embedability, and conformability are needed. the old Federal Mopgul "Microbabbit" bearings come to mind. the term "Rebuilt Engine" means a lot of different things to different people. if mains are OK i'd bet on an out of round rod or just a dirty job, lots of Crap left in oil passages. post pictures when possible and buyer beware! Luck Doofus

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                            • #15
                              If the bearings are down to the copper like mine were, then the crankshaft will need to be turned and the entire engine disassembled and cleaned to remove all traces of the bearing material. This would also include new camshaft bearings. Not good news, but at least the engine can likely be salvaged. in my case the engine was removed and a good running engine put in its place. The removed engine was the original engine for that car according to the production order so it's being saved for a future rebuild.
                              Dan Peterson
                              Montpelier, VT
                              1960 Lark V-8 Convertible
                              1960 Lark V-8 Convertible (parts car)

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