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  • 62 hawk ?

    hey every one i have a 62 hawk GT that we are restoring.
    we have put an LT1 chevy motor in it with the 4L60E trans.
    my question is what are some of you doing about the brake hydrolic system? basically we cant use the stock booster its in the way plus it dont work anyways.
    so im really just looking for some ideas on what to do like puting in a new master cylinder and booster or just what.
    thanks for any info!!

    also is there anyway for me to tell what rear end is in this car im having the drive shaft built for it and they said the original shaft had different caps on the rer joints so they dont know witch ones to put on the new shaft. they said if i can tell the what rear end it is they will know witch ones to use.

    thanks again

  • #2
    Well, you are modifying the car, not restoring it. "Restore" means to put back to original condition, and Studebaker didn't install LT1 Chevy motors and 4L60E transmissions.

    There's nothing wrong with modifying the car that way; it's just the mis-use of the term I'm objecting to. Call it a resto-mod, if you like.

    Contact Jim Turner at <www.turnerbrake.com> He has an under-floor dual-circuit master cylinder bracket. He can also provide you with kits to add late-model disc brakes, or even 4-wheel disc brakes.

    The car should have a Dana model 44 rear axle in it, which is plenty strong enough for your power train. Most Studes of the '60s used Spicer U-joints of the same size as used by Chevy for years and years, but there were some that used as Mechanic's grooved U-joint, the kind where the C-clips go on the inboard side of the ears of the yoke.

    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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    • #3
      dbcustoms-try the search function at the top right of this page. There have been a lot of discussions about power brakes,disc brakes,engine swaps, etc [I was probably on this forum for 6 months before I found the search button!]

      LaSalle,Il
      61Hawk
      Oglesby,Il.

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      • #4
        yes your right gord i did use the term wrong it is a resto-mod. and 52 hawk i know about the search i was really just looking for personal opinions on what has worked best for people as far as the brakes. thanks for all the info! is there anyway for me to tell if its the dana 44 they just dont know what u-joints to put on the new shaft they said one of the caps where different on the original. is it easy to take the pinion yoke off to take it to them?

        Comment


        • #5
          Its a positional thing. If you can get in a position to exceed 170 lbs of torque to get the nut off, then it's easy.

          [img=left]http://www.alink.com/personal/tbredehoft/Bothcars4.jpg[/img=left]
          Tom Bredehoft
          '53 Commander Coupe
          '55 President State Sedan (Under Construction) 99.5 hrs.
          '05 Legacy Ltd Wagon
          All Indiana built cars

          Comment


          • #6
            quote:Originally posted by dbcustoms
            and is there anyway for me to tell if its the dana 44
            If it was a V8 car, it's a Dana 44. Also, it will have "44" on one of the webs near the pumpkin.

            If it is the original axle, I'd suggest you buy the flanged Mosier axle conversion from Phil Harris at Fairborn Studebaker. That LT1 may not be kind on those original keyed axles and it is REAL messy when you break one [xx(].

            The self energizing drum brakes on your GT are pretty good brakes. I'd keep them. See Turner for a dual chamber master cylinder kit for your car. You'll also have to change the pedal for one that was for non power brakes or else the geometry will be weird. You can not use the stock hydrovac with a dual master cylinder and a booster will not fit under the floor.


            Dick Steinkamp
            Bellingham, WA

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            • #7
              yes it had the 289 v8 in it.
              so as far as the brakes go your saying it would be best to go with that DCMC kit and just not have a booster?
              that sonds like the best way to go. thanks for the info!

              Comment


              • #8
                Can that rearend! It's too wide for most aftermarket rims and once you put some tire under it and torque it good, those axles are gonna spin. There are plenty of good choices out there. Just get the tires and wheels you want that won't rub the inner or outer fender then line up a rearend. Does anybody know if 275 60 will clear if they're run in the middle of the wheelwell?

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                • #9
                  quote:Originally posted by buddymander
                  There are plenty of good choices out there.
                  I'm not sure about that. There are a FEW rear ends that are as narrow or just a tad narrower, but I don't think PLENTY. If you could list them with the mounting flange to mounting flange dimension, that would help. IMHO, the only way to get AS STOUT a rear end as a DANA 44 with the after market flanged axles is a custom Ford 9"...fairly pricey.


                  Dick Steinkamp
                  Bellingham, WA

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                  • #10
                    Those 8.8 fords are available in a lot of widths. The 8 3/4 Chrysler is too and is easy to narrow. Both are stronger than a Dana 44. Custom offset wheels are something I would hate to spend any bucks on.

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                    • #11
                      quote:Originally posted by buddymander
                      Does anybody know if 275 60 will clear if they're run in the middle of the wheelwell?
                      The "60" is kind of immaterial...that's just the aspect ratio. 275 is the width in millimeters. My guess is that they would. The key would be how low the car is. The width of the wheel well gets narrower towards the top.


                      Dick Steinkamp
                      Bellingham, WA

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        This poor old horse has been beaten beyond any ASPCA guidelines. buddymander and I may be the chief abusers of this topic. I will submit most who ask for advice on this topic do not have buddymander's experience, skills and perseverence. Having done every axle swap mentioned and several which aren't, I still maintain for most Studebaker street applications, the Dana 44 is still the way to go:

                        1. It bolts in. By the time a rear axle swap is up and running, with custom width, driveshaft, brakes, parking brake, the time and money would have put lots of miles on a Dana 44.
                        2. With the Fairborn axle conversion, the Dana 44 is bulletproof. No one will ever break one on the street.
                        3. There are thousands and thousands of gear sets from 2.56 to 6.12 and TwinTraction units floating around the Studebaker universe. Every 4x4 shop has the parts and knows how to put a Dana 44 together quickly and inexpensively.
                        4. Today's CNC universe has the cost difference between custom offset wheels to catalog wheels at less than that of a custom rear axle.

                        As always, your car, your money, your choice.


                        PackardV8
                        PackardV8

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                        • #13
                          I know we've sorta kinda hijacked this thread, but...

                          I'm still having a hard time listing those stock rear ends (strong enough to handle a V8) that are actually narrower than a Stude Dana 44.

                          I THINK a Stude Dana 44 is about 52" backing plate to backing plate and about 58" wheel mounting surface to wheel mounting surface (somebody please correct me).

                          I can find these...

                          http://www.carnut.com/specs/frear.html

                          and these...

                          http://50chevy.freeservers.com/Suspension_Widths.html

                          Looks like a Maverick 8" might be the only one listed that is just slightly narrower.

                          I have heard an S10 is a little narrower (don't know if they will handle a warm V8 however).

                          Does ANYBODY have any actual widths of rear ends that might give a little more tire room? Also, please correct my stock Dana 44 width if I am wrong.




                          Dick Steinkamp
                          Bellingham, WA

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            See the thing about rearends is that the front drop out types usually have one axle longer than the other; about 3". So you can narrow one of these types by cutting only one side and using a factory short axle. Saves a ton of money by only having to shorten one side and not having to order custom axles. A driveshaft shop can probably do the one side for about $60.

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                            • #15
                              Sorry to be dense here, but the driveshaft starts in the center of the tunnel. If the tread width is too wide, then one side only was cut, wouldn't that put the driveshaft off-center in the tunnel by that amount?

                              thnx, jv.

                              PackardV8
                              PackardV8

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