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Welding rear fenders

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  • wagone
    replied
    To my eyes the red car posted by Dick looks odd without the lower trim pieces on the outside to hide the joint. Looks kinda like a '57 F**d and our cars need to maintain their distinctiveness (I know, the 289 was made by F**D, but we don't need to make it look "Detroitish", too). Just MHO.

    wagone

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  • Dick Steinkamp
    replied
    Like this?...








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  • rockne10
    replied
    If this is something you must do, I would endorse using panel adhesives. There will be no warpage. All adhered surfaces must be very clean bare steel.

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  • Studeman
    replied
    Here's what I do.... this keeps the fins/quarters remove-able, although they still need the welds drilled out to remove the fins.
    http://ncsdc.com/TechnicalPages/FinsTech/index.htm

    I wouldn't recommend fully-welding the quarters or fins. Yes, the risk of warping the panels is always there. The trouble comes with not being able to seal the inside of the fin 100%. If you leave any pinhole etc... it will begin rusting from the inside out. It may take awhile, but by the time it shows up on the outside of the body... the innerds are toast.

    You could try using Fusor or another metal-to-metal panel adhesive. Door skin adhesives, etc..

    Ray


    Specializing in Studebaker Restoration

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  • gordr
    replied
    It can be done, and it looks great, but you lose the advantage of being able to easily remove the quarter panel in the event of collision damage.

    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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  • vegas paul
    replied
    I saw one at a show that was done as you have suggested. It looked great, and it was obviously done by someone with a high degree of sheet-metal welding experience. As Wagone says above, it made a huge positive difference in the looks of the car. I didn't discuss the particulars with the owner, however.

    BTW, I also saw (at a different show!) a '51 similar to mine, where they had welded the fenders thus removing the welting. These were smoothly transitioned with a slight curve and it also looked great for a modified vehicle. Looked like lots of work.

    Las Vegas, NV - Stop by, coffee's on!
    '51 Champion Business Coupe G899965 10G-Q4-1434

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  • wagone
    replied
    There is one on eBay as we speak which appears to have this modification (although it is unclear--obviously--whether the wings are welded or done poorly). I must say that to me this change enhances the appearance of the winged Hawks.

    wagone

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  • mike gaines
    started a topic Welding rear fenders

    Welding rear fenders

    I am nearly finished the mechanical rebuild of my 58 Silverhawk and my thoughts are turning to the body restoration.I dont like the rear fender arrangement and would like to weld the fenders onto the body and do away with the moulding that covers the fender/body join.I would like this join to dissapear and create a smooth panel between the body and fender.Is this type of modification achievable ? My concern is that the heat that would be generated in welding the fender onto the body could distort the two panels. Any thoughts on what type of welding would prevent this.Also the riveted join of the fin onto the fender is very bad on my car and is rusting along the join.Can these two body pieces be welded and any thoughts on reducing the rust factor?
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