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'55 President steering wheel - what is the top color?

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  • Interior: '55 President steering wheel - what is the top color?

    Gentlemen:

    I am working on the '55 President State Sedan and I want to paint the steering wheel in the next couple of days. I have included a picture of it after the PC7 was applied. The bottom part of the wheel is the Mist Greige Metallic interior color. I have always thought the top part was the Sonora Beige roof color of the car. It appears to be too dark to be Ermine White which I recently painted a couple of parts with. I would appreciate some feedback on the OEM color. I am guessing that all the two-tone steering wheels in '55 would have had the same color on top?

    Thank you,
    Charlie D.

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  • #2
    I ended up using Mercedes-Benz light ivory

    For what it’s worth I thought I would respond to my own question. It may or may not help someone in the future. Joe Parsons told me the top color of the steering wheel in his Speedster appeared to be an ivory color. I did some research and the closest color I could find to match my wheel was a light ivory used on 63-72 Mercedes-Benzes.

    I went to English Color here in Tulsa and they could not find a formula in any of the PPG lines. They then tried the European brand, Glasurit, and there was a formula for the light ivory. They mixed up 4 ounces of the Acrylic Urethane and it cost $6 per ounce.

    I had cut out the cracks in the wheel with a 1/8” round carbide burr on a dremel tool, filled the cracks with the PC7 two-part epoxy and sanded it down with a die grinder and 40 grit sanding disc. I used finer grits of sand paper to try to get it fairly smooth and ended up having to use some Dolphin Glaze to fill some nicks.

    I sprayed the wheel with SPI epoxy primer. The lower half was then painted with Mist Greige Metallic to match the interior color and the top half with the light ivory. I was pleased with the way it turned out and I don’t think the color is too far off the original.

    Charlie D.

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    • #3
      Charlie,
      That came out looking great. I saw your post back on the 11th and was going to respond. I went out to the parking lot to look at the steering wheel on '55 President State and realized I had wrapped it in leather. It was all stitched up so I could not get even a glimpse of the wheel. I am glad to see you decided on a solution. Whether it is correct or not does not detract from how good it looks. I hope I get to meet you and see your car some day. It is turning out fantastic.
      Ed Sallia
      Dundee, OR

      Sol Lucet Omnibus

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Commander Eddie View Post
        Charlie,
        That came out looking great. I saw your post back on the 11th and was going to respond. I went out to the parking lot to look at the steering wheel on '55 President State and realized I had wrapped it in leather. It was all stitched up so I could not get even a glimpse of the wheel. I am glad to see you decided on a solution. Whether it is correct or not does not detract from how good it looks. I hope I get to meet you and see your car some day. It is turning out fantastic.
        I agree with Ed. I have an unrestored '55 President Coupe. It sits in silent repose deep in the man cave (pole barn). I have not looked through the dirty darkened windows in months to notice my steering wheel. Yours looks great, and your dedicated efforts look to have paid off well. As far as I'm concerned, if you are pleased, nothing else matters. Besides, as our fleet & Studebaker owners age, the time is approaching that nobody will have first hand knowledge of what the steering wheel details were. Same for other characteristics of various model cars. One example, for me, is the fact that my 1951 Land Cruiser has sported a Hawk/Coupe style front bumper for nearly two decades, and no one has ever mentioned it to me unless I pointed it out.

        My opinion is that as long as you do it well, it looks good, and you like it, it will please you, and that's what really matters.
        John Clary
        Greer, SC

        SDC member since 1975

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by jclary View Post
          Yours looks great, and your dedicated efforts look to have paid off well. As far as I'm concerned, if you are pleased, nothing else matters. Besides, as our fleet & Studebaker owners age, the time is approaching that nobody will have first hand knowledge of what the steering wheel details were. Same for other characteristics of various model cars.

          My opinion is that as long as you do it well, it looks good, and you like it, it will please you, and that's what really matters.
          My thoughts exactly. I see lots of 50-52 cars with parts swapped year to year and most people don't know the difference.
          "In the heart of Arkansas."
          Searcy, Arkansas
          1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
          1952 2R pickup

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Charlie D View Post
            For what it’s worth I thought I would respond to my own question. It may or may not help someone in the future. Joe Parsons told me the top color of the steering wheel in his Speedster appeared to be an ivory color. I did some research and the closest color I could find to match my wheel was a light ivory used on 63-72 Mercedes-Benzes.

            I went to English Color here in Tulsa and they could not find a formula in any of the PPG lines. They then tried the European brand, Glasurit, and there was a formula for the light ivory. They mixed up 4 ounces of the Acrylic Urethane and it cost $6 per ounce.

            I had cut out the cracks in the wheel with a 1/8” round carbide burr on a dremel tool, filled the cracks with the PC7 two-part epoxy and sanded it down with a die grinder and 40 grit sanding disc. I used finer grits of sand paper to try to get it fairly smooth and ended up having to use some Dolphin Glaze to fill some nicks.

            I sprayed the wheel with SPI epoxy primer. The lower half was then painted with Mist Greige Metallic to match the interior color and the top half with the light ivory. I was pleased with the way it turned out and I don’t think the color is too far off the original.

            Charlie D.

            [ATTACH=CONFIG]63545[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]63546[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]63547[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]63548[/ATTACH]$


            You're really doing a GREAT job 'bringing back' this '55 President State sedan....BRAVO!!!!

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