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  • #16
    You're going to have to tear it down and buy a new set of bearings. OUCH! Plus, as others have said, I really don't like the look of that scored bearing anyway. You really need to plastigage the bearings/journals!! It's CHEAP and ESSENTIAL!

    You should see me when I assemble an engine (and to a MUCH lesser degree a transmission). The space I use is more like a "clean room" and I check EVERYTHING about 10 times before wrenching. I might be paranoid, but I have NEVER ONCE had a problem due to an assembly error. With the cost now approaching THREE GRAND to build up a Stude V8 I just simply can't afford to make a mistake!

    I will be building the R1 for the '56 this Spring. Maybe I should take pics and document the assembly? I am NOT a "trained" mechanic--I just started building cars in my teens when I had no money and have continued to do so. I mean, I always figuered why pay somebody to assemble an engine when I could use that extra money somewhere else in the project.

    The only motor that ever through me threw a loop was a 392 Hemi out of an Imperial. Now THAT was a BEAR!! And talk about EXPENSIVE--I did that one over 10 years ago for my wife's sister and it ended up at aobut FOUR GRAND all in.


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    • #17
      I am with you Allan. I learned the hard way, and reversed a main bearing cap back in '72, and put a hairline crack in the block. Was able to rework the block, and make a dirt track engine out of it. Dumb. And yes, please take pictures and post them as you assemble your engine. I, for one, would like a refresher in Stude Engines 101.

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      • #18
        Don't lose heart, Leonard, it really isn't brain surgery. Just follow the shop manual, go slowly, double check/torque everything and keep it all as clean as possible. Hey, if I can do it, you can too. You'll have it purring soon and get a great feeling of having done it yourself.

        Western Washington, USA

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        • #19
          Like you said Leonard its a set back. Read the good book. The manual will get you through this. Heck, thats what winter is for, Get ready for all the fun ahead.

          Gordon


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          • #20
            Concerning things binding uo, make sure the inserts are located where they are supposed to be. The little tit on the insert is supposed to slip in the notch on the bearing cap and hold the insert in place. I've had the insert slip just a bit which forced it up, causing things to bind up. Never had it happen then the engine was upside down in the shop, but with the engine and crank still in place and trying to slid the upper insert over the crank.

            Don't worry though, I know it's a real pain, but you wouldn't be the first person to have something go wrong.

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            • #21
              in Past I worked in auto parts for 19 years,Seen more than once where bearings in a box did not match size stated. Always look at your new bearings to make sure of part number and Size! I have seem 020 half bearings in with .010 bearings and all variations. This was with name brand bearings. Of course plasigauge is the best answer ,but watch as you assemble and make sure caps are on correct, in correct order, and turned correct way. I just took dowm a 350 chevy (sorry ) 4 bolt main with a shim under the main bearing to correct bad cap. Needless to say, I will not be using that block unless linebored.( but it worked for previous owner and did wear well).

              Randy Wilkin
              Randy Wilkin
              1946 M5 Streetrod
              Hillsboro,Ohio 45133

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              • #22
                It's possible to put some Borg Warner three speed transmissions in two gears at once, which locks them up, and the engine as well.
                Mike M.

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