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Electric Fuel Pump in conjunction with the manual

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  • Fuel System: Electric Fuel Pump in conjunction with the manual

    I know I have seen the answers on the forum, but can't locate them. My plan is to use inline as a backup for when vapor lock issues happen. I have seen info on one from NAPA, but do not remember the part numbers. I know they have to be low volume to work with the original pump. Any assistance will be appreciated. Thanks.

  • #2
    I've mounted the ones I've used on the frame, above the rear axle on the driver's side, in the line from the tank to the mechanical pump on the motor. I put a filter (they sometimes come with a filter) ahead of the electric pump. I wired it with a switch under the dash, so it could be turned on before the motor starts to crank. Once running, I generally turn it off, unless it seems to vapor lock. I source the electricity from the accessory terminal on the ignition switch.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Tom B View Post
      I've mounted the ones I've used on the frame, above the rear axle on the driver's side, in the line from the tank to the mechanical pump on the motor. I put a filter (they sometimes come with a filter) ahead of the electric pump. I wired it with a switch under the dash, so it could be turned on before the motor starts to crank. Once running, I generally turn it off, unless it seems to vapor lock. I source the electricity from the accessory terminal on the ignition switch.
      That's what I have done also. It works great for starting an engine that has been sitting for a few weeks and also eliminates vapor lock on engines that are prone to doing that. And hooking it through a toggle switch to the accessory terminal allows you to run the pump to prime the whole system, without turning on the ignition and possibly burning the distributor points and the original Pertronix.

      The ones I use look like cylinders with axial ports in and out. Unfortunately, I didn't save the part numbers either. My last one came from NAPA, was the low pressure one, and I looked at it before buying, and was able to suck air through it.
      Last edited by RadioRoy; 03-23-2017, 08:35 PM.
      RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.


      10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
      4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
      5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon

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      • #4
        I know people do it...but it's NOT safe to run an electric thru a mechanical pump. I'd never do it..!
        Just run the electric. If you want under the hood to look the part, spend a few minutes playing with the fuel line routing. make it "look" right.

        Mechanical pump diaphragms leak. When they do...all that "pass thru" gas...goes straight to the oil pan..!

        How lucky do you feel...today ?

        Mike

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        • #5
          I've seen members use the electric pumps use as a pusher pump when the car starts to vapor lock. What you're saying Mike makes a lot of sense. It's making me rethink my set ups.

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          • #6
            The safe way is to use it with an on off switch to the accessory side of the ignition switch, lets you use it to prime the system, but doesn't pump after it's running. Just be sure it is a "flow through" type that won't block normal flow when its not running. If you do experience vapor lock, shut the engine off, prime with the pump, restart and go, just don't forget to turn it off. If you wind up with fuel in the oil, your mechanical pump was bad already anyway.

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            • #7
              Just the way I had my 56J set up. Used a NAPA P74029 in-line electric fuel pump.

              Bill L.



              Originally posted by karterfred88 View Post
              The safe way is to use it with an on off switch to the accessory side of the ignition switch, lets you use it to prime the system, but doesn't pump after it's running. Just be sure it is a "flow through" type that won't block normal flow when its not running. If you do experience vapor lock, shut the engine off, prime with the pump, restart and go, just don't forget to turn it off. If you wind up with fuel in the oil, your mechanical pump was bad already anyway.
              Bill L.
              1962 GT Hawk

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              • #8
                On VERY rare occasions where someone used a Poor quality AirTex Mechanical Fuel Pump without or with a poor Diaphragm to Crankcase internal SEAL, Yes they have gotten Fuel contamination in the crankcase.

                I have never experienced that in 54 years, so would not hesitate to run an Electric Pump for backup, cold, dry starts, vapor lock etc. because I only use Original OEM Carter Mechanical Fuel Pumps rebuilt with Ethanol resistant parts.
                StudeRich
                Second Generation Stude Driver,
                Proud '54 Starliner Owner
                SDC Member Since 1967

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                • #9
                  I was researching this recently for Barney. For anyone searching, the article by Larry Claypool is on pages 14-16 of the March 2011 issue of TW.

                  Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

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                  • #10
                    I installed a 6 volt Carter pump on the frame rail under the drivers seat but I installed a momentary switch( push button ) under the dash. Works great if they have been sitting awhile and if it starts to vapor lock just push the button to push fuel to the carb

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                    • #11
                      Ditto. If mech. pump fails you have a back up. We often let our cars set for days or even weeks without starting them. I flip on the electric pump for a few seconds and the car fires right up(usually!) If you use a vane type you'll need to prime it.

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                      • #12
                        I also would like to put in an electric fuel pump to pressure system after car (1962 GT Hawk) has been sitting for some time ( spraying starting fluid works but too much trouble) to eliminate long cranking periods, either using oil pressure cut/off switch or dash mounted switch. Problem is I can't find one that says "Flow Through". Auto Parts stores aren't much help at knowing which is Flow Through pumps and all the ones I looked at don't say one way or the other. Thanks for any help identifying one.

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                        • #13
                          I do not know for sure how to tell either, but any of the higher quality, more expensive, Rotary Pumps I am pretty sure would not flow through.

                          All of the Fuel Pumps used in conjunction with the factory Mechanical ones I have seen were the cheaper, Chinese made, cylinder shaped in line pumps, very small like a Metal in-line Filter can.
                          StudeRich
                          Second Generation Stude Driver,
                          Proud '54 Starliner Owner
                          SDC Member Since 1967

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                          • #14
                            I am using a "Mr. Gasket" electric fuel pump, p/n #12S. It comes with fittings and a filter. Got it a Auto Zone for about 35-40 bucks. I also found a two throw switch that is momentary contact one way and fixed contact the other. I was told that is a marine switch, but I'm not sure. Got it at a swap meet years ago. Works great. -Jim

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                            • #15
                              Maybe someone can provide a true definition of " vapor lock" In 35 years of of building - working on old cars and working at a company that runs lots of gas powered LARGE vehicles in uphill high heat conditions….I have yet to experience the dreaded vapor lock. My understanding of it is, back in the day cars ran very low fuel pump pressure,3 lbs. or less…and the fuel in the line closest to the source of heat would boil in the line, causing " vapor lock" Thoughts?

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