Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

linings

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Brakes: linings

    just a quick question ,this pic is the left hand front brake shoe, after reading a recent post are the linings the wrong way around ,on all drums larger lining is to the front of car,its a 62 hawk,
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Hi Brooker-
    I posted a query abut my relined shoes lately. Feedback from one member stated that "the secondary (rear) shoe should be the longer one." If that's the convention, then it appears your shoes as pictured need swapping places.
    Steve, Melbourne Aust.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks Steve this is the way the linings was when i got the car, and like a lot of things on it the previous owner got it wrong and being new to owning a stude i presumed they was ok ,so will swap all the larger linings to the rear of car ,

      Comment


      • #4
        The confusion comes (maybe) from the fact that earlier cars had non-self energizing brakes - the ones with a fixed shoe anchor at the bottom. That type gets the longer shoe in the front.

        Self energizing brakes, the ones with the floating star wheel adjustment, get the longer linings at the rear shoe.

        Make sure the keystone block above the wheel cylinder is installed the correct way also. It has a tiny arrow at the top that points to the front of the car. It's behind where the two springs intersect.
        RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

        17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
        10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
        10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
        4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
        5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
        56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
        60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

        Comment


        • #5
          thanks Roy didnt realise the keystone block was directional,

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by brooker View Post
            thanks Roy didnt realise the keystone block was directional,
            You are welcome.
            One edge is curved and the other edge is flat. If one or more are oriented incorrectly, the brakes could energize differently from one another.
            RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

            17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
            10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
            10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
            4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
            5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
            56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
            60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

            Comment


            • #7
              I have a question with reference to the brake shoes. We all know the self centering assemblies use a primary and secondary shoe for aided efficiency in friction transfer from front to rear and that is a product of the energy transfer from the live link between the two shoes. What is the mechanical reasoning for the longer shoe being in the front vs the rear. I could be wrong on this as my memory isn't always as perfect as I like to imagine but years ago it seems there were several manufactures using twin wheel cylinders in 1 wheel and the shoes were the same length. Thats just what I remember but that could be sideways as well.

              Comment


              • #8
                My DeSotos had 2 wheel cylinders per wheel...one per shoe

                Comment


                • #9
                  I thought that, I started working with Mercedes Benz in 1970 and they had some older cars that had two cylinders per wheel.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Bill A View Post
                    I have a question with reference to the brake shoes. We all know the self centering assemblies use a primary and secondary shoe for aided efficiency in friction transfer from front to rear and that is a product of the energy transfer from the live link between the two shoes. What is the mechanical reasoning for the longer shoe being in the front vs the rear. I could be wrong on this as my memory isn't always as perfect as I like to imagine but years ago it seems there were several manufactures using twin wheel cylinders in 1 wheel and the shoes were the same length. Thats just what I remember but that could be sideways as well.
                    Your description of action is correct, but in reference to the picture in #1, since the anchor pin is at the top, it was determined the secondary shoe, with the longer lining, should be at the rear.
                    If some car has the anchor pin at the bottom, then the secondary shoe would be on the forward side.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X