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Upgrading 53 Champions brakes

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  • thunderations
    replied
    Thanks for the info. These drums may be OK, but I'm not sure. Just thought that it would be a cheap way to get better brakes without spending the bucks for discs.

    Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
    I believe those 1/2 Ton Dodge 11 Inch Drums were not Front, the center hole size would probably be wrong, they are used for Front Disc. equipped Studes. on the Rear, after machining the depth shallower.

    Reproduction 11" Finned Front Hub & Drum Assy's. are available New.

    Leave a comment:


  • BRUCESTUDE
    replied
    I put Lark era brakes on a '51 Commander I had for several years, including upgrading the rears from 9" to 10" drums. The result was totally worth it! The hardest part was finding drums that could be SAFELY turned.

    Leave a comment:


  • StudeRich
    replied
    Originally posted by thunderations View Post
    Just reading through this and it dawned on me that I have the 11" front drum brakes from a 64 Daytona that I'm replacing with Turner discs.
    Anyone interested in the 11" drum set up, give me a shout. Not sure of the condition of the drums at this point, but another thread pertains to readily available replacements from a Dodge. $100 plus shipping.
    I believe those 1/2 Ton Dodge 11 Inch Drums were not Front, the center hole size would probably be wrong, they are used for Front Disc. equipped Studes. on the Rear, after machining the depth shallower.

    Reproduction 11" Finned Front Hub & Drum Assy's. are available New.

    Leave a comment:


  • thunderations
    replied
    Just reading through this and it dawned on me that I have the 11" front drum brakes from a 64 Daytona that I'm replacing with Turner discs.
    Anyone interested in the 11" drum set up, give me a shout. Not sure of the condition of the drums at this point, but another thread pertains to readily available replacements from a Dodge. $100 plus shipping.

    Leave a comment:


  • altair
    replied
    You can have brakes off a 747 installed but the friction between the rubber and the road is what really matters.

    Leave a comment:


  • sweetolbob
    replied
    The problem with depending on defensive driving to avoid incidents may have worked 40 years ago but in this age of fools and damn fools on the road it's not enough. There's no end to the people that will cut you off or pull out in front of you on the road.

    Saying the older technology will suffice may get you by, but for me, I'm putting the best available brakes on mine. I want the tires to leave black rubber on the road when I stand on them.

    Your money, your choice. Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • 52-fan
    replied
    Nothing wrong with adequately sized drum brakes. I never understood the logic behind putting smaller brakes on six cylinder cars. They still have to stop a car that is almost as heavy.
    I drove my 52 Champion with stock brakes for many years and only had a few close calls. The current 52 Commander with later V-8 brakes is fine. I would still put discs on it in the future, but the conversion has been pushed back on my to do list.

    Leave a comment:


  • fastjohnll
    replied
    I built my "53 around 1970. I installed V-8 brakes with metallic shoes. They worked great after the first few stops.(They needed heat in them to stop good) The great thing about the metallic shoes was no brake fade. Close to the Air Force Base I was stationed at was a road that dropped over 4300 feet in less than 20 miles. Absolutely no fade coming down that mountain. I do not suppose they are available for Studes any more.

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  • Hawkowner
    replied
    I had a 53 commander hard that had awful brakes I. Put drums shoes bearings and backing plates from a 56 or 57 sedan then it would stop.
    Hawkowner

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    If you have ever done a Brake Job or complete Rebuild on the '47 to '53 Lockheed Style self adjusted Brakes with the Eccentric adjusters on each shoe AND the Late Bendix Type Wagner Brakes on the '54 to '66 Studes. you would understand that it is not Only the Sq. Inches of Lining Area that makes for good stopping Power, the design of the mechanism that Applies the Shoes makes a HUGE difference.

    In 1954 when Wagner developed that setup for Studebaker, a '54 Commander could out stop most anything on the Road!
    When you see how that "self energizing" system works you understand why.

    So no, you can NEVER make that archaic '53 CHAMPION System Stop Like a '54 Commander, sorry.

    Leave a comment:


  • altair
    replied
    Brakes and application are a science in themselves. Friction does stop the car but it is the friction between the road and the tires only. The fronts are the most important. Pedal pressure to create braking action may differ from one car to another. If the drums have been turned oversize and standard shoes are installed the efficiency may be affected, the shoes should be arced to fit the different diameter. The pedal may feel spongy because you are bending the shoe to fit the different arc. Dodge cars had adjustments for the shoes to fit the different arc. With the good quality shoe material and good fitting shoes the brakes should be more than adequate coupled with proper brake application. Decades ago when I first learned to drive I was instructed to snub the brakes to avoid over heating while decending a hill, however that was proven incorrect, steady pressure will reduce overheating as opposed to snubbing. Good quality hoses, non leaking cylinders and good fitting shoes to the drum is all you need.

    Leave a comment:


  • sals54
    replied
    Originally posted by mbstude View Post
    No booster. It took some foot pressure to stop, but not quiet as much as the stock drum setup.
    Ditto for me. I've run 12" rotors with large Chrysler calipers on my coupe for decades with no power booster. No trouble stopping at all. Never have brake fade. Even when coming down from Reno which is 7000 ft elevation drop in about a hundred miles. Or the 3000 ft fall from Gorman to Grapevine in about 15 miles. That one is fun. Try that with your Champion brakes when a Semi jackknifes on a 6% grade right in front of you, eh?
    Last edited by sals54; 11-16-2016, 08:33 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • mbstude
    replied
    Originally posted by RadioRoy View Post
    Did you install some sort of a power booster also? Does the pedal feel like you have to step on it really hard? I've been toying with installing disks in the front of my 60 Lark V-8, but would like to test drive one first. Heard lots of opinions on how hard the pedal is.
    No booster. It took some foot pressure to stop, but not quiet as much as the stock drum setup.

    Leave a comment:


  • thunderations
    replied
    You may be able to contact Jim Turner on that problem. He may have an answer regarding a different master cylinder, compensating valve, or different rear brake cylinders to make the peddle correct without a booster.
    Originally posted by RadioRoy View Post
    Did you install some sort of a power booster also? Does the pedal feel like you have to step on it really hard? I've been toying with installing disks in the front of my 60 Lark V-8, but would like to test drive one first. Heard lots of opinions on how hard the pedal is.

    Leave a comment:


  • RadioRoy
    replied
    Originally posted by mbstude View Post
    I agree with Sal. There's no such thing as overkill on a brake system.

    To answer your question, the 54 and later V8 brakes were pretty good. You'll need everything that bolts to the spindle; backing plate, hardware, shoes, cylinder, drum, etc. The backing plates and all the other parts are a simple bolt on, no modification required. There's no need to buy a parts car, just post an ad here. There's enough people with spare parts that finding the stuff won't be too hard.

    I installed Turner front disc brakes with a dual master cylinder on a '52 pickup and that was the single best thing I did to that truck. Best stopping Studebaker I've had. http://turnerbrake.com/
    Did you install some sort of a power booster also? Does the pedal feel like you have to step on it really hard? I've been toying with installing disks in the front of my 60 Lark V-8, but would like to test drive one first. Heard lots of opinions on how hard the pedal is.

    Leave a comment:

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